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POLITICS, MILITARY CONSCRIPTION, AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IN THE LATE OTTOMAN EMPIRE

Successive Ottoman governments excluded the religious colleges (medreses) from the ambitious educational policies they pursued beginning in the 19th century. Many historians and contemporary observers have seen this trend as an anomaly, because this was a period characterized by governmental activis... Full description

Journal Title: International Journal of Middle East Studies May 2006, Vol.38(2), p.283
Main Author: Bein, Amit
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 00207438 ; E-ISSN: 14716380 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0020743806412356
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/195594276/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: POLITICS, MILITARY CONSCRIPTION, AND RELIGIOUS EDUCATION IN THE LATE OTTOMAN EMPIRE
format: Article
creator:
  • Bein, Amit
subjects:
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Students
  • Politics
  • Religious Schools
  • Religion
  • Reforms
  • Religious Education
  • Imperialism
  • Islam
  • Nationalization
  • Politics
  • Education Policy
  • Modernity
  • Religion Politics Relationship
  • Historians
  • Religious Education
  • Turkish Language
  • Patronage
  • 19th Century
  • Educational Reform
  • Draft (Military)
  • Islamic Countries
  • Learning
  • Ideology
  • Ruling Class
  • Activism
  • Oxford University Press
ispartof: International Journal of Middle East Studies, May 2006, Vol.38(2), p.283
description: Successive Ottoman governments excluded the religious colleges (medreses) from the ambitious educational policies they pursued beginning in the 19th century. Many historians and contemporary observers have seen this trend as an anomaly, because this was a period characterized by governmental activism and broad changes imposed from the top, including in the field of education. The inactivity of the government during the long reign of Abdülhamid II (r. 1876-1909) appears particularly intriguing. The Hamidian regime enunciated the ideological, social, and political importance of Islam and extended its patronage to the religious establishment and its institutions. Nevertheless, the Hamidian government kept medrese education outside the fold of its educational project. The medreses were left unchanged in terms of administration, pedagogy, and curricula, even as the Hamidian regime impressively expanded the state school system, initiated a series of educational reforms, and promoted state education as a vanguard of progress and modernity. Meanwhile, in other parts of the Islamic world, initiatives were taken to reform and modernize institutions of Islamic learning. In the Ottoman Empire, the government took similar steps to reorganize medrese education only after the Committee of Union and Progress (CUP) came to power in the wake of Constitutional Revolution of 1908. However, the new regime also gradually, but consistently, diminished the former prominence of the religious establishment and its institutions and prepared the ground for the complete nationalization of religious education in 1924 by the fledgling Turkish Republic. [PUBLICATION ]
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 00207438 ; E-ISSN: 14716380 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0020743806412356
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00207438
  • 0020-7438
  • 14716380
  • 1471-6380
url: Link


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subjectOttoman Empire ; Students ; Politics ; Religious Schools ; Religion ; Reforms ; Religious Education ; Imperialism ; Islam ; Nationalization ; Politics ; Education Policy ; Modernity ; Religion Politics Relationship ; Historians ; Religious Education ; Turkish Language ; Patronage ; 19th Century ; Educational Reform ; Draft (Military) ; Islamic Countries ; Learning ; Ideology ; Ruling Class ; Activism ; Oxford University Press
descriptionSuccessive Ottoman governments excluded the religious colleges (medreses) from the ambitious educational policies they pursued beginning in the 19th century. Many historians and contemporary observers have seen this trend as an anomaly, because this was a period characterized by governmental activism and broad changes imposed from the top, including in the field of education. The inactivity of the government during the long reign of Abdülhamid II (r. 1876-1909) appears particularly intriguing. The Hamidian regime enunciated the ideological, social, and political importance of Islam and extended its patronage to the religious establishment and its institutions. Nevertheless, the Hamidian government kept medrese education outside the fold of its educational project. The medreses were left unchanged in terms of administration, pedagogy, and curricula, even as the Hamidian regime impressively expanded the state school system, initiated a series of educational reforms, and promoted state education as a vanguard of progress and modernity. Meanwhile, in other parts of the Islamic world, initiatives were taken to reform and modernize institutions of Islamic learning. In the Ottoman Empire, the government took similar steps to reorganize medrese education only after the Committee of Union and Progress (CUP) came to power in the wake of Constitutional Revolution of 1908. However, the new regime also gradually, but consistently, diminished the former prominence of the religious establishment and its institutions and prepared the ground for the complete nationalization of religious education in 1924 by the fledgling Turkish Republic. [PUBLICATION ]
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6Religious Education
7Imperialism
8Islam
9Nationalization
10Education Policy
11Modernity
12Religion Politics Relationship
13Historians
14Turkish Language
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17Educational Reform
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19Islamic Countries
20Learning
21Ideology
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abstractSuccessive Ottoman governments excluded the religious colleges (medreses) from the ambitious educational policies they pursued beginning in the 19th century. Many historians and contemporary observers have seen this trend as an anomaly, because this was a period characterized by governmental activism and broad changes imposed from the top, including in the field of education. The inactivity of the government during the long reign of Abdülhamid II (r. 1876-1909) appears particularly intriguing. The Hamidian regime enunciated the ideological, social, and political importance of Islam and extended its patronage to the religious establishment and its institutions. Nevertheless, the Hamidian government kept medrese education outside the fold of its educational project. The medreses were left unchanged in terms of administration, pedagogy, and curricula, even as the Hamidian regime impressively expanded the state school system, initiated a series of educational reforms, and promoted state education as a vanguard of progress and modernity. Meanwhile, in other parts of the Islamic world, initiatives were taken to reform and modernize institutions of Islamic learning. In the Ottoman Empire, the government took similar steps to reorganize medrese education only after the Committee of Union and Progress (CUP) came to power in the wake of Constitutional Revolution of 1908. However, the new regime also gradually, but consistently, diminished the former prominence of the religious establishment and its institutions and prepared the ground for the complete nationalization of religious education in 1924 by the fledgling Turkish Republic. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
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doi10.1017/S0020743806412356
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pages283-301
date2006-05-01