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Pulmonary and sinus fungal diseases in non-immunocompromised patients

The human respiratory tract is exposed daily to airborne fungi, fungal enzymes, and secondary metabolites. The endemic fungiHistoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioidesspp,Blastomyces dermatitidis, andParacoccidioides brasiliensis, and occasionallyAspergillus fumigatus, are primary pulmonary pathogens of ot... Full description

Journal Title: The Lancet Infectious Diseases Nov 1, 2017, Vol.17(11), pp.e357-e366
Main Author: Denning, David
Other Authors: Chakrabarti, Arunaloke
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 14733099 ; E-ISSN: 14744457 ; DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30309-2
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/1976733156/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Pulmonary and sinus fungal diseases in non-immunocompromised patients
format: Article
creator:
  • Denning, David
  • Chakrabarti, Arunaloke
subjects:
  • Aspergillus
  • Aspergillus Fumigatus
  • Fungi
  • Fungicides
  • Immunocompromised Hosts
  • Fungal Diseases
  • Airborne Microorganisms
  • Cell Culture
  • Patients
  • Genetic Factors
  • Metabolites
  • Children
  • Metabolites
  • Therapy
  • Risk Analysis
  • Bronchitis
  • Sinus
  • Genetic Factors
  • Infections
  • Exposure
  • Lung Diseases
  • Risk Factors
  • Fungi
  • Immunoglobulin G
  • Secondary Metabolites
  • Microscopy
  • Nose
  • Rhinosinusitis
  • Health Risks
  • Infections
  • Asthma
  • Lung
  • Asthma
  • Sinuses
  • Allergies
  • Azoles
  • Exposure
  • Respiratory Tract
  • Genotype & Phenotype
  • Children
  • Cystic Fibrosis
  • Asthma
  • Pneumonia
  • Children
  • Sputum
  • Secondary Metabolites
  • Fungi
  • Bacterial Infections
  • Metabolites
  • Presentations
  • Heterocyclic Compounds
  • Respiratory Tract
  • Risk Factors
  • Viral Infections
  • Allergens
  • Cell Walls
ispartof: The Lancet Infectious Diseases, Nov 1, 2017, Vol.17(11), pp.e357-e366
description: The human respiratory tract is exposed daily to airborne fungi, fungal enzymes, and secondary metabolites. The endemic fungiHistoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioidesspp,Blastomyces dermatitidis, andParacoccidioides brasiliensis, and occasionallyAspergillus fumigatus, are primary pulmonary pathogens of otherwise healthy people. Such infections resolve in most people, and only a few infections lead to disease. However, many fungi are directly allergenic by colonising the respiratory tract or indirectly through contact with cell wall constituents and proteases, causing or exacerbating allergic disease. Increasing evidence implicates high indoor fungal exposures as a precipitant of asthma in children and in worsening asthma symptoms. Lung or airways infection by endemic fungi or aspergillus can be diagnosed with respiratory sample culture or serum IgG testing. Sputum, induced sputum, or bronchial specimens are all suitable specimens for detecting fungi; microscopy, fungal culture, galactomannan antigen, and aspergillus PCR are useful tests. Antifungal treatment is indicated in almost all patients with chronic cavitary pulmonary infections, chronic invasive and granulomatous rhinosinusitis, and aspergillus bronchitis. Most patients with fungal asthma benefit from antifungal therapy. Adverse reactions to oral azoles, drug interactions, and azole resistance inAspergillusspp limit therapy. Environmental exposures, genetic factors, and structural pulmonary risk factors probably underlie disease but are poorly understood.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 14733099 ; E-ISSN: 14744457 ; DOI: 10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30309-2
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14733099
  • 1473-3099
  • 14744457
  • 1474-4457
url: Link


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titlePulmonary and sinus fungal diseases in non-immunocompromised patients
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subjectAspergillus ; Aspergillus Fumigatus ; Fungi ; Fungicides ; Immunocompromised Hosts ; Fungal Diseases ; Airborne Microorganisms ; Cell Culture ; Patients ; Genetic Factors ; Metabolites ; Children ; Metabolites ; Therapy ; Risk Analysis ; Bronchitis ; Sinus ; Genetic Factors ; Infections ; Exposure ; Lung Diseases ; Risk Factors ; Fungi ; Immunoglobulin G ; Secondary Metabolites ; Microscopy ; Nose ; Rhinosinusitis ; Health Risks ; Infections ; Asthma ; Lung ; Asthma ; Sinuses ; Allergies ; Azoles ; Exposure ; Respiratory Tract ; Genotype & Phenotype ; Children ; Cystic Fibrosis ; Asthma ; Pneumonia ; Children ; Sputum ; Secondary Metabolites ; Fungi ; Bacterial Infections ; Metabolites ; Presentations ; Heterocyclic Compounds ; Respiratory Tract ; Risk Factors ; Viral Infections ; Allergens ; Cell Walls
descriptionThe human respiratory tract is exposed daily to airborne fungi, fungal enzymes, and secondary metabolites. The endemic fungiHistoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioidesspp,Blastomyces dermatitidis, andParacoccidioides brasiliensis, and occasionallyAspergillus fumigatus, are primary pulmonary pathogens of otherwise healthy people. Such infections resolve in most people, and only a few infections lead to disease. However, many fungi are directly allergenic by colonising the respiratory tract or indirectly through contact with cell wall constituents and proteases, causing or exacerbating allergic disease. Increasing evidence implicates high indoor fungal exposures as a precipitant of asthma in children and in worsening asthma symptoms. Lung or airways infection by endemic fungi or aspergillus can be diagnosed with respiratory sample culture or serum IgG testing. Sputum, induced sputum, or bronchial specimens are all suitable specimens for detecting fungi; microscopy, fungal culture, galactomannan antigen, and aspergillus PCR are useful tests. Antifungal treatment is indicated in almost all patients with chronic cavitary pulmonary infections, chronic invasive and granulomatous rhinosinusitis, and aspergillus bronchitis. Most patients with fungal asthma benefit from antifungal therapy. Adverse reactions to oral azoles, drug interactions, and azole resistance inAspergillusspp limit therapy. Environmental exposures, genetic factors, and structural pulmonary risk factors probably underlie disease but are poorly understood.
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8Patients
9Genetic Factors
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15Sinus
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17Exposure
18Lung Diseases
19Risk Factors
20Immunoglobulin G
21Secondary Metabolites
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abstractThe human respiratory tract is exposed daily to airborne fungi, fungal enzymes, and secondary metabolites. The endemic fungiHistoplasma capsulatum, Coccidioidesspp,Blastomyces dermatitidis, andParacoccidioides brasiliensis, and occasionallyAspergillus fumigatus, are primary pulmonary pathogens of otherwise healthy people. Such infections resolve in most people, and only a few infections lead to disease. However, many fungi are directly allergenic by colonising the respiratory tract or indirectly through contact with cell wall constituents and proteases, causing or exacerbating allergic disease. Increasing evidence implicates high indoor fungal exposures as a precipitant of asthma in children and in worsening asthma symptoms. Lung or airways infection by endemic fungi or aspergillus can be diagnosed with respiratory sample culture or serum IgG testing. Sputum, induced sputum, or bronchial specimens are all suitable specimens for detecting fungi; microscopy, fungal culture, galactomannan antigen, and aspergillus PCR are useful tests. Antifungal treatment is indicated in almost all patients with chronic cavitary pulmonary infections, chronic invasive and granulomatous rhinosinusitis, and aspergillus bronchitis. Most patients with fungal asthma benefit from antifungal therapy. Adverse reactions to oral azoles, drug interactions, and azole resistance inAspergillusspp limit therapy. Environmental exposures, genetic factors, and structural pulmonary risk factors probably underlie disease but are poorly understood.
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doi10.1016/S1473-3099(17)30309-2
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/1976733156/
date2017-11-01