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Mutualistic Webs of Species

As life has diversified over billions of years, so have the ways of extracting a living by exploiting other species. Indeed, no multicellular eukaryotic organism is capable of surviving and reproducing using only its nuclear genes and the gene products it makes. Species coopt the genomes of other sp... Full description

Journal Title: Science (Washington) Apr 21, 2006, Vol.312(5772), pp.372-373
Main Author: Thompson, John
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1126904
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/19772146/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest19772146
title: Mutualistic Webs of Species
format: Article
creator:
  • Thompson, John
subjects:
  • Water Uptake
  • Genomes
  • Seeds
  • Photosynthesis
  • Pollinators
  • Energy
  • Mutualism
  • Mitochondria
  • Nutrients
  • Chloroplasts
  • Reproduction
  • Webs
  • Aves
  • Mammalia
  • Formicidae
  • Insecta
  • Ecology Studies - General
  • Symbiosis & Commensalism
  • Cell Biology
  • Ants
  • Birds
  • Insects
  • Mammals
ispartof: Science (Washington), Apr 21, 2006, Vol.312(5772), pp.372-373
description: As life has diversified over billions of years, so have the ways of extracting a living by exploiting other species. Indeed, no multicellular eukaryotic organism is capable of surviving and reproducing using only its nuclear genes and the gene products it makes. Species coopt the genomes of other species by forming mutualistic, but inherently selfish, alliances. You can grasp the central importance of mutualistic associations in the diversification of life through a simple thought experiment. Try to imagine a plant that can survive and reproduce in a real ecosystem without using, in addition to its nuclear genome, most of the following: a mitochondrial genome (to convert energy); a chloroplast genome (to regulate photosynthesis); one or more mycorrhizal fungal genomes (to improve nutrient and water uptake); the genomes of pollinators (to assist in reproduction); and the genomes of a few birds, mammals, or ants (to move seeds around the ecosystem). Each plant is part of a complex web of interacting mutualists.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1126904
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 00368075
  • 0036-8075
url: Link


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identifierISSN: 0036-8075 ; DOI: 10.1126/science.1126904
subjectWater Uptake ; Genomes ; Seeds ; Photosynthesis ; Pollinators ; Energy ; Mutualism ; Mitochondria ; Nutrients ; Chloroplasts ; Reproduction ; Webs ; Aves ; Mammalia ; Formicidae ; Insecta ; Ecology Studies - General ; Symbiosis & Commensalism ; Cell Biology ; Ants ; Birds ; Insects ; Mammals
descriptionAs life has diversified over billions of years, so have the ways of extracting a living by exploiting other species. Indeed, no multicellular eukaryotic organism is capable of surviving and reproducing using only its nuclear genes and the gene products it makes. Species coopt the genomes of other species by forming mutualistic, but inherently selfish, alliances. You can grasp the central importance of mutualistic associations in the diversification of life through a simple thought experiment. Try to imagine a plant that can survive and reproduce in a real ecosystem without using, in addition to its nuclear genome, most of the following: a mitochondrial genome (to convert energy); a chloroplast genome (to regulate photosynthesis); one or more mycorrhizal fungal genomes (to improve nutrient and water uptake); the genomes of pollinators (to assist in reproduction); and the genomes of a few birds, mammals, or ants (to move seeds around the ecosystem). Each plant is part of a complex web of interacting mutualists.
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7Mitochondria
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10Reproduction
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abstractAs life has diversified over billions of years, so have the ways of extracting a living by exploiting other species. Indeed, no multicellular eukaryotic organism is capable of surviving and reproducing using only its nuclear genes and the gene products it makes. Species coopt the genomes of other species by forming mutualistic, but inherently selfish, alliances. You can grasp the central importance of mutualistic associations in the diversification of life through a simple thought experiment. Try to imagine a plant that can survive and reproduce in a real ecosystem without using, in addition to its nuclear genome, most of the following: a mitochondrial genome (to convert energy); a chloroplast genome (to regulate photosynthesis); one or more mycorrhizal fungal genomes (to improve nutrient and water uptake); the genomes of pollinators (to assist in reproduction); and the genomes of a few birds, mammals, or ants (to move seeds around the ecosystem). Each plant is part of a complex web of interacting mutualists.
doi10.1126/science.1126904
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/19772146/
eissn10959203
date2006-04-21