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Oxygen isotopic signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes

For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope ( super(13)C and super(18)O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the de... Full description

Journal Title: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions Nov 5, 2008, Vol.8(6), pp.18993-19034
Main Author: Schumacher, M
Other Authors: M Neubert, Re , J Meijer, Ha , Jansen, H , Brand, Wa , Geilmann, H , Werner, R
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1680-7367 ; E-ISSN: 1680-7375
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/20073742/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Oxygen isotopic signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes
format: Article
creator:
  • Schumacher, M
  • M Neubert, Re
  • J Meijer, Ha
  • Jansen, H
  • Brand, Wa
  • Geilmann, H
  • Werner, R
subjects:
  • Oxygen Isotopes
  • Atmospheric Oxygen
  • Carbon Cycle
  • High Temperatures
  • Atmospheric Chemistry
  • Fires
  • Physical Properties/Composition (551.510.3/.4)
ispartof: Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, Nov 5, 2008, Vol.8(6), pp.18993-19034
description: For a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope ( super(13)C and super(18)O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta super(18)O signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the super(18)O signature of the produced CO sub(2) is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26ppt became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7ppt was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent super(18)O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO sub(2) and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original super(18)O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1680-7367 ; E-ISSN: 1680-7375
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 16807367
  • 1680-7367
  • 16807375
  • 1680-7375
url: Link


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titleOxygen isotopic signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes
creatorSchumacher, M ; M Neubert, Re ; J Meijer, Ha ; Jansen, H ; Brand, Wa ; Geilmann, H ; Werner, R
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ispartofAtmospheric Chemistry and Physics Discussions, Nov 5, 2008, Vol.8(6), pp.18993-19034
identifierISSN: 1680-7367 ; E-ISSN: 1680-7375
subjectOxygen Isotopes ; Atmospheric Oxygen ; Carbon Cycle ; High Temperatures ; Atmospheric Chemistry ; Fires ; Physical Properties/Composition (551.510.3/.4)
descriptionFor a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope ( super(13)C and super(18)O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta super(18)O signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the super(18)O signature of the produced CO sub(2) is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26ppt became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7ppt was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent super(18)O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO sub(2) and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original super(18)O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.
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titleOxygen isotopic signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes
descriptionFor a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope ( super(13)C and super(18)O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta super(18)O signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the super(18)O signature of the produced CO sub(2) is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26ppt became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7ppt was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent super(18)O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO sub(2) and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original super(18)O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.
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abstractFor a comprehensive understanding of the global carbon cycle precise knowledge of all processes is necessary. Stable isotope ( super(13)C and super(18)O) abundances provide information for the qualification and the quantification of the diverse source and sink processes. This study focuses on the delta super(18)O signature of CO sub(2) from combustion processes, which are widely present both naturally (wild fires), and human induced (fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning) in the carbon cycle. All these combustion processes use atmospheric oxygen, of which the isotopic signature is assumed to be constant with time throughout the whole atmosphere. The combustion is generally presumed to take place at high temperatures, thus minimizing isotopic fractionation. Therefore it is generally supposed that the super(18)O signature of the produced CO sub(2) is equal to that of the atmospheric oxygen. This study, however, reveals that the situation is much more complicated and that important fractionation effects do occur. From laboratory studies fractionation effects in the order of about 26ppt became obvious, a clear differentiation of about 7ppt was also found in car exhausts which were sampled directly under ambient atmospheric conditions. We investigated a wide range of materials (both different raw materials and similar materials with different inherent super(18)O signature), sample geometries (e.g. texture and surface-volume ratios) and combustion circumstances. We found that the main factor influencing the specific isotopic signatures of the combustion-derived CO sub(2) and of the concomitantly released oxygen-containing side products, is the case-specific rate of combustion. This points firmly into the direction of (diffusive) transport of oxygen to the reaction zone as the cause of the isotope fractionation. The original super(18)O signature of the material appeared to have little or no influence.
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date2008-11-05