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IS INDONESIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE TO THE POOR? EVIDENCE FROM HEALTH POLICY IMPLEMENTATION

Since decentralization in 2001, Indonesian local governments have acquired a key role in poverty alleviation and social service delivery. The extent to which they have been able to meet this challenge is subject to debate, however, and systematic analysis of policy outcomes remains scarce. This pape... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of East Asian Studies Nov 2016, Vol.16(3), pp.307-330
Main Author: Fossati, Diego
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 15982408 ; E-ISSN: 22346643 ; DOI: 10.1017/jea.2016.17
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/2010875111/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: IS INDONESIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE TO THE POOR? EVIDENCE FROM HEALTH POLICY IMPLEMENTATION
format: Article
creator:
  • Fossati, Diego
subjects:
  • Indonesia
  • Jakarta Indonesia
  • Health Care Policy
  • Decentralization
  • Politics
  • Health Care Services Policy
  • Insurance Coverage
  • Oligarchy
  • Local Government
  • Political Science
  • Democracy
  • Health Economics
  • Local Government
  • Incentives
  • Accountability
  • Antipoverty Programs
  • Local Elections
  • Social Policy
  • Authoritarianism
  • Health Insurance
  • Households
  • Low Income Groups
  • Literature
  • Public Opinion Surveys
  • Decentralization
  • Election Results
  • Poverty
  • Accountability
  • Social Services
  • Policy Implementation
  • Health Policy
  • Health Services
  • Districts
  • Elections
  • International Bank for Reconstruction & Development–World Bank
  • Indonesian Politics
  • Democratic Accountability
  • Health Policy
  • Poverty Alleviation
  • Decentralization
  • Pilkada
ispartof: Journal of East Asian Studies, Nov 2016, Vol.16(3), pp.307-330
description: Since decentralization in 2001, Indonesian local governments have acquired a key role in poverty alleviation and social service delivery. The extent to which they have been able to meet this challenge is subject to debate, however, and systematic analysis of policy outcomes remains scarce. This paper contributes to the literature with a study of the district-level implementation of Jamkesmas, Indonesia's free healthcare program for the poor. Using original data on policy implementation, I show that local government is to some extent responsive to the needs of the most vulnerable. In years when local elections (pilkada) are implemented, low-income households are targeted more accurately, suggesting that electoral incentives for local elites may increase access to social services among the poor. However, I also show that the positive effect of local direct elections is limited to districts with electorally competitive politics.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 15982408 ; E-ISSN: 22346643 ; DOI: 10.1017/jea.2016.17
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15982408
  • 1598-2408
  • 22346643
  • 2234-6643
url: Link


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titleIS INDONESIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE TO THE POOR? EVIDENCE FROM HEALTH POLICY IMPLEMENTATION
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subjectIndonesia ; Jakarta Indonesia ; Health Care Policy ; Decentralization ; Politics ; Health Care Services Policy ; Insurance Coverage ; Oligarchy ; Local Government ; Political Science ; Democracy ; Health Economics ; Local Government ; Incentives ; Accountability ; Antipoverty Programs ; Local Elections ; Social Policy ; Authoritarianism ; Health Insurance ; Households ; Low Income Groups ; Literature ; Public Opinion Surveys ; Decentralization ; Election Results ; Poverty ; Accountability ; Social Services ; Policy Implementation ; Health Policy ; Health Services ; Districts ; Elections ; International Bank for Reconstruction & Development–World Bank ; Indonesian Politics ; Democratic Accountability ; Health Policy ; Poverty Alleviation ; Decentralization ; Pilkada
descriptionSince decentralization in 2001, Indonesian local governments have acquired a key role in poverty alleviation and social service delivery. The extent to which they have been able to meet this challenge is subject to debate, however, and systematic analysis of policy outcomes remains scarce. This paper contributes to the literature with a study of the district-level implementation of Jamkesmas, Indonesia's free healthcare program for the poor. Using original data on policy implementation, I show that local government is to some extent responsive to the needs of the most vulnerable. In years when local elections (pilkada) are implemented, low-income households are targeted more accurately, suggesting that electoral incentives for local elites may increase access to social services among the poor. However, I also show that the positive effect of local direct elections is limited to districts with electorally competitive politics.
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titleIS INDONESIAN LOCAL GOVERNMENT ACCOUNTABLE TO THE POOR? EVIDENCE FROM HEALTH POLICY IMPLEMENTATION
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15Local Elections
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23Election Results
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25Social Services
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abstractSince decentralization in 2001, Indonesian local governments have acquired a key role in poverty alleviation and social service delivery. The extent to which they have been able to meet this challenge is subject to debate, however, and systematic analysis of policy outcomes remains scarce. This paper contributes to the literature with a study of the district-level implementation of Jamkesmas, Indonesia's free healthcare program for the poor. Using original data on policy implementation, I show that local government is to some extent responsive to the needs of the most vulnerable. In years when local elections (pilkada) are implemented, low-income households are targeted more accurately, suggesting that electoral incentives for local elites may increase access to social services among the poor. However, I also show that the positive effect of local direct elections is limited to districts with electorally competitive politics.
copCambridge
pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/jea.2016.17
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/2010875111/
date2016-11-01