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Portal vein thrombosis related to Cassia angustifolia

Introduction. Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulat... Full description

Journal Title: Clinical Toxicology Sep 2008, Vol.46(8), pp.774-777
Main Author: Soyuncu, S
Other Authors: Cete, Y , Nokay, A
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1556-3650 ; DOI: 10.1080/15563650701682097
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/20156603/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Portal vein thrombosis related to Cassia angustifolia
format: Article
creator:
  • Soyuncu, S
  • Cete, Y
  • Nokay, A
subjects:
  • Thrombolysis
  • Vomiting
  • Anthraquinone
  • Carcinoembryonic Antigen
  • Leaves
  • Pain
  • Portal Vein
  • Metabolites
  • Peristalsis
  • Thrombosis
  • Hepatotoxicity
  • Color
  • Fever
  • Laxatives
  • Colon
  • Case Reports
  • Anorexia
  • Glycosides
  • Liver
  • Fabaceae
  • Cassia Angustifolia
  • Agrochemicals
ispartof: Clinical Toxicology, Sep 2008, Vol.46(8), pp.774-777
description: Introduction. Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulation and expulsion. In the literature, there are repots illustrating the hepatotoxic effects of Cassia angustifolia but there is no report of portal vein thrombosis caused by Cassia Angustifolia. Case Report. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a five-day history of worsening epigastric pain, anorexia, episodic vomiting, and intermittent fever. She reported that she had boiled dried senna leaves she had bought from herbalists and drank approximately 200 mL daily for two years. Color Doppler screening found an echogen thrombus obliterating portal vein bifurcation and the right branch. The lumen was obstructed at this level and there was no blood flow through it. Treatment with thrombolytics was unsuccessful. Discussion. Severe hepatotoxicity senna use is unusual. The cause of senna-related hepatotoxicity is unclear but could be explained by the exposure of the liver to unusual amounts of toxic metabolites of anthraquinone glycosides. Conclusion. Chronic use of Cassia angustifolia may rarely be associated with portal vein thrombosis.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1556-3650 ; DOI: 10.1080/15563650701682097
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15563650
  • 1556-3650
url: Link


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titlePortal vein thrombosis related to Cassia angustifolia
creatorSoyuncu, S ; Cete, Y ; Nokay, A
contributorSoyuncu, S (correspondence author)
ispartofClinical Toxicology, Sep 2008, Vol.46(8), pp.774-777
identifierISSN: 1556-3650 ; DOI: 10.1080/15563650701682097
subjectThrombolysis ; Vomiting ; Anthraquinone ; Carcinoembryonic Antigen ; Leaves ; Pain ; Portal Vein ; Metabolites ; Peristalsis ; Thrombosis ; Hepatotoxicity ; Color ; Fever ; Laxatives ; Colon ; Case Reports ; Anorexia ; Glycosides ; Liver ; Fabaceae ; Cassia Angustifolia ; Agrochemicals
descriptionIntroduction. Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulation and expulsion. In the literature, there are repots illustrating the hepatotoxic effects of Cassia angustifolia but there is no report of portal vein thrombosis caused by Cassia Angustifolia. Case Report. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a five-day history of worsening epigastric pain, anorexia, episodic vomiting, and intermittent fever. She reported that she had boiled dried senna leaves she had bought from herbalists and drank approximately 200 mL daily for two years. Color Doppler screening found an echogen thrombus obliterating portal vein bifurcation and the right branch. The lumen was obstructed at this level and there was no blood flow through it. Treatment with thrombolytics was unsuccessful. Discussion. Severe hepatotoxicity senna use is unusual. The cause of senna-related hepatotoxicity is unclear but could be explained by the exposure of the liver to unusual amounts of toxic metabolites of anthraquinone glycosides. Conclusion. Chronic use of Cassia angustifolia may rarely be associated with portal vein thrombosis.
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descriptionIntroduction. Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulation and expulsion. In the literature, there are repots illustrating the hepatotoxic effects of Cassia angustifolia but there is no report of portal vein thrombosis caused by Cassia Angustifolia. Case Report. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a five-day history of worsening epigastric pain, anorexia, episodic vomiting, and intermittent fever. She reported that she had boiled dried senna leaves she had bought from herbalists and drank approximately 200 mL daily for two years. Color Doppler screening found an echogen thrombus obliterating portal vein bifurcation and the right branch. The lumen was obstructed at this level and there was no blood flow through it. Treatment with thrombolytics was unsuccessful. Discussion. Severe hepatotoxicity senna use is unusual. The cause of senna-related hepatotoxicity is unclear but could be explained by the exposure of the liver to unusual amounts of toxic metabolites of anthraquinone glycosides. Conclusion. Chronic use of Cassia angustifolia may rarely be associated with portal vein thrombosis.
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abstractIntroduction. Cassia angustifolia (Senna), used as a laxative, is a plant from the Fabaceae family. It includes hydroxyanthracene glycosides, also known as Senna Sennoside. These glycosides stimulate the peristalsis of the colon and alter colonic absorption and secretion resulting in fluid accumulation and expulsion. In the literature, there are repots illustrating the hepatotoxic effects of Cassia angustifolia but there is no report of portal vein thrombosis caused by Cassia Angustifolia. Case Report. A 42-year-old woman was admitted to the emergency department with a five-day history of worsening epigastric pain, anorexia, episodic vomiting, and intermittent fever. She reported that she had boiled dried senna leaves she had bought from herbalists and drank approximately 200 mL daily for two years. Color Doppler screening found an echogen thrombus obliterating portal vein bifurcation and the right branch. The lumen was obstructed at this level and there was no blood flow through it. Treatment with thrombolytics was unsuccessful. Discussion. Severe hepatotoxicity senna use is unusual. The cause of senna-related hepatotoxicity is unclear but could be explained by the exposure of the liver to unusual amounts of toxic metabolites of anthraquinone glycosides. Conclusion. Chronic use of Cassia angustifolia may rarely be associated with portal vein thrombosis.
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date2008-09-01