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SALAFI THOUGHT IN TURKISH PUBLIC DISCOURSE SINCE 1980

Turkey has been absent from the growing literature on the phenomenon of transnational Salafism. A tendency among Middle East specialists to focus on Arab regions and in Turkey on the Islamist movement and its long struggle with the Kemalist establishment has perpetuated the notion of Turkey as a cat... Full description

Journal Title: International Journal of Middle East Studies Aug 2017, Vol.49(3), pp.417-435
Main Author: Hammond, Andrew
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 00207438 ; E-ISSN: 14716380 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0020743817000319
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/2197771528/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest2197771528
title: SALAFI THOUGHT IN TURKISH PUBLIC DISCOURSE SINCE 1980
format: Article
creator:
  • Hammond, Andrew
subjects:
  • Turkey
  • Egypt
  • Lebanon
  • Istanbul Turkey
  • Islam
  • Ideology
  • Islamic Culture
  • Secularism
  • Religion
  • Theology
  • Nationalism
  • 20th Century
  • Intellectuals
  • Islam
  • Sufism
  • Specialists
  • Muslims
  • Theologians
  • Scholars
  • Materialism
  • Sufism
  • Arabic Language
  • Modernism
  • Mass Media
  • Translation
  • Programming (Broadcast)
  • Transnationalism
  • Transnationalism
  • Discourse Analysis
  • Focus
  • Literary Translation
  • Religion
  • Arabic Language
  • Topic and Comment
  • Global Salafism
  • Middle East Studies
  • Political Islam
  • Republican Turkey
  • Saudi Arabia
ispartof: International Journal of Middle East Studies, Aug 2017, Vol.49(3), pp.417-435
description: Turkey has been absent from the growing literature on the phenomenon of transnational Salafism. A tendency among Middle East specialists to focus on Arab regions and in Turkey on the Islamist movement and its long struggle with the Kemalist establishment has perpetuated the notion of Turkey as a category apart. This article argues that, on the contrary, Salafism is a fringe strand of Turkish Islam that began to evolve in the context of the state's effort in the 1980s to recalibrate religion as a complement to nationalism. Salafism became a topic of discussion in media and scholarly writing in Turkish religious studies faculties, while self-styled Salafi preachers trained in Saudi Arabia found a niche through publishing houses. These publishers facilitated the translation into Turkish of Arabic texts by important Saudi religious scholars in an effort to change the discursive landscape of Islam in Turkey. I show that contra assumptions of a rich Sufi tradition acting as a block against modern Salafi ideas, Salafism managed to gain a foothold in Turkey, facilitated in part by the republic's experience of secular materialism.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 00207438 ; E-ISSN: 14716380 ; DOI: 10.1017/S0020743817000319
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00207438
  • 0020-7438
  • 14716380
  • 1471-6380
url: Link


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subjectTurkey ; Egypt ; Lebanon ; Istanbul Turkey ; Islam ; Ideology ; Islamic Culture ; Secularism ; Religion ; Theology ; Nationalism ; 20th Century ; Intellectuals ; Islam ; Sufism ; Specialists ; Muslims ; Theologians ; Scholars ; Materialism ; Sufism ; Arabic Language ; Modernism ; Mass Media ; Translation ; Programming (Broadcast) ; Transnationalism ; Transnationalism ; Discourse Analysis ; Focus ; Literary Translation ; Religion ; Arabic Language ; Topic and Comment ; Global Salafism ; Middle East Studies ; Political Islam ; Republican Turkey ; Saudi Arabia
descriptionTurkey has been absent from the growing literature on the phenomenon of transnational Salafism. A tendency among Middle East specialists to focus on Arab regions and in Turkey on the Islamist movement and its long struggle with the Kemalist establishment has perpetuated the notion of Turkey as a category apart. This article argues that, on the contrary, Salafism is a fringe strand of Turkish Islam that began to evolve in the context of the state's effort in the 1980s to recalibrate religion as a complement to nationalism. Salafism became a topic of discussion in media and scholarly writing in Turkish religious studies faculties, while self-styled Salafi preachers trained in Saudi Arabia found a niche through publishing houses. These publishers facilitated the translation into Turkish of Arabic texts by important Saudi religious scholars in an effort to change the discursive landscape of Islam in Turkey. I show that contra assumptions of a rich Sufi tradition acting as a block against modern Salafi ideas, Salafism managed to gain a foothold in Turkey, facilitated in part by the republic's experience of secular materialism.
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titleSALAFI THOUGHT IN TURKISH PUBLIC DISCOURSE SINCE 1980
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abstractTurkey has been absent from the growing literature on the phenomenon of transnational Salafism. A tendency among Middle East specialists to focus on Arab regions and in Turkey on the Islamist movement and its long struggle with the Kemalist establishment has perpetuated the notion of Turkey as a category apart. This article argues that, on the contrary, Salafism is a fringe strand of Turkish Islam that began to evolve in the context of the state's effort in the 1980s to recalibrate religion as a complement to nationalism. Salafism became a topic of discussion in media and scholarly writing in Turkish religious studies faculties, while self-styled Salafi preachers trained in Saudi Arabia found a niche through publishing houses. These publishers facilitated the translation into Turkish of Arabic texts by important Saudi religious scholars in an effort to change the discursive landscape of Islam in Turkey. I show that contra assumptions of a rich Sufi tradition acting as a block against modern Salafi ideas, Salafism managed to gain a foothold in Turkey, facilitated in part by the republic's experience of secular materialism.
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pubCambridge University Press
doi10.1017/S0020743817000319
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/2197771528/
date2017-08-01