schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

At the Forefront of a Post-Patriarchal Islamic Education Female Teachers in Indonesia

This article argues that the ongoing introduction of a gender perspective in Indonesian Islamic education is challenging the partially unconscious patriarchal gender regime of these institutions and a means of resisting traditional notions of religious authority. The activities of female teachers, s... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of International Women's Studies Nov 2009, Vol.11(1), pp.25-39
Main Author: Kull, Ann
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 15398706
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest232109168
title: At the Forefront of a Post-Patriarchal Islamic Education Female Teachers in Indonesia
format: Article
creator:
  • Kull, Ann
subjects:
  • Islam
  • Education
  • Society
  • Field Study
  • Scholars
ispartof: Journal of International Women's Studies, Nov 2009, Vol.11(1), pp.25-39
description: This article argues that the ongoing introduction of a gender perspective in Indonesian Islamic education is challenging the partially unconscious patriarchal gender regime of these institutions and a means of resisting traditional notions of religious authority. The activities of female teachers, scholars and researchers are instrumental in these endeavors. This study draws on empirical material collected through fieldwork in Jakarta, Yogyakarta, Makassar, Banjarmasin, and Bandung, and includes brochures, books, course literature, research, interviews, and discussions. Data is primarily collected from state institutes for higher Islamic education and especially at their respective Centers for Women Studies. This material constitutes examples of how female, and male, religious scholars and teachers challenge the prevailing gender bias in Islamic education on all levels by introducing a gender perspective in curriculum, teaching, and textbooks, but also in their roles as exemplars and religious authorities. I argue that these measures are important in creating gender awareness among Muslim students. However, to successfully challenge the structures of Islamic education, several conditions have to be met: producing less gender-biased Islamic interpretations, an academic climate that is open to inclusion of these interpretations in Islamic education on various levels, increasing the number of female teachers, and sufficient economic funding. Some of these prerequisites are already being met in the case of Indonesia. [PUBLICATION ]
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 15398706
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 15398706
  • 1539-8706
url: Link


@attributes
ID1107996032
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid232109168
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest232109168
sourcesystemOther
pqid232109168
galeid229530772
display
typearticle
titleAt the Forefront of a Post-Patriarchal Islamic Education Female Teachers in Indonesia
creatorKull, Ann
ispartofJournal of International Women's Studies, Nov 2009, Vol.11(1), pp.25-39
identifierE-ISSN: 15398706
subjectIslam ; Education ; Society ; Field Study ; Scholars
descriptionThis article argues that the ongoing introduction of a gender perspective in Indonesian Islamic education is challenging the partially unconscious patriarchal gender regime of these institutions and a means of resisting traditional notions of religious authority. The activities of female teachers, scholars and researchers are instrumental in these endeavors. This study draws on empirical material collected through fieldwork in Jakarta, Yogyakarta, Makassar, Banjarmasin, and Bandung, and includes brochures, books, course literature, research, interviews, and discussions. Data is primarily collected from state institutes for higher Islamic education and especially at their respective Centers for Women Studies. This material constitutes examples of how female, and male, religious scholars and teachers challenge the prevailing gender bias in Islamic education on all levels by introducing a gender perspective in curriculum, teaching, and textbooks, but also in their roles as exemplars and religious authorities. I argue that these measures are important in creating gender awareness among Muslim students. However, to successfully challenge the structures of Islamic education, several conditions have to be met: producing less gender-biased Islamic interpretations, an academic climate that is open to inclusion of these interpretations in Islamic education on various levels, increasing the number of female teachers, and sufficient economic funding. Some of these prerequisites are already being met in the case of Indonesia. [PUBLICATION ]
languageeng
source
version3
oafree_for_read
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
linktorsrc$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/232109168/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontribKull, Ann
titleAt the Forefront of a Post-Patriarchal Islamic Education Female Teachers in Indonesia
descriptionThis article argues that the ongoing introduction of a gender perspective in Indonesian Islamic education is challenging the partially unconscious patriarchal gender regime of these institutions and a means of resisting traditional notions of religious authority. The activities of female teachers, scholars and researchers are instrumental in these endeavors. This study draws on empirical material collected through fieldwork in Jakarta, Yogyakarta, Makassar, Banjarmasin, and Bandung, and includes brochures, books, course literature, research, interviews, and discussions. Data is primarily collected from state institutes for higher Islamic education and especially at their respective Centers for Women Studies. This material constitutes examples of how female, and male, religious scholars and teachers challenge the prevailing gender bias in Islamic education on all levels by introducing a gender perspective in curriculum, teaching, and textbooks, but also in their roles as exemplars and religious authorities. I argue that these measures are important in creating gender awareness among Muslim students. However, to successfully challenge the structures of Islamic education, several conditions have to be met: producing less gender-biased Islamic interpretations, an academic climate that is open to inclusion of these interpretations in Islamic education on various levels, increasing the number of female teachers, and sufficient economic funding. Some of these prerequisites are already being met in the case of Indonesia. [PUBLICATION ]
subject
0Islam
1Education
2Society
3Field Study
4Scholars
general
0English
1Bridgewater State College
2GenderWatch (Alumni edition)
3GenderWatch
4Social Science Database (Alumni edition)
5ProQuest Social Science Journals
6International Bibliography of the Social Sciences
7Publicly Available Content Database
8ProQuest Central
9International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
10ProQuest Business Collection
11ProQuest Politics Collection
12ProQuest Social Sciences Premium Collection
13ProQuest Sociology Collection
14ProQuest Central (new)
15ProQuest Central K-12
16ProQuest Central Korea
17Social Science Premium Collection
18ProQuest Central Essentials
19ProQuest Central China
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest232109168
issn
015398706
11539-8706
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2009
addtitleJournal of International Women's Studies
searchscope
01006229
11006729
21006766
31007200
41007409
51007945
61008165
71008886
81009127
91009168
101009240
111009386
121009730
1310000039
1410000118
1510000146
1610000164
1710000181
1810000182
1910000183
2010000184
2110000185
2210000255
2310000256
2410000257
2510000258
2610000262
2710000281
2810000300
2910000348
3010000357
3110000360
32proquest
scope
01006229
11006729
21006766
31007200
41007409
51007945
61008165
71008886
81009127
91009168
101009240
111009386
121009730
1310000039
1410000118
1510000146
1610000164
1710000181
1810000182
1910000183
2010000184
2110000185
2210000255
2310000256
2410000257
2510000258
2610000262
2710000281
2810000300
2910000348
3010000357
3110000360
32proquest
lsr43
01006229true
11006729true
21006766true
31007200true
41007409false
51007945true
61008165true
71008886true
81009127true
91009168true
101009240true
111009386true
121009730true
1310000039true
1410000118true
1510000146false
1610000164true
1710000181false
1810000182false
1910000183false
2010000184true
2110000185false
2210000255true
2310000256true
2410000257true
2510000258true
2610000262true
2710000281true
2810000300true
2910000348true
3010000357true
3110000360true
startdate20091101
enddate20091101
citationpf 25 pt 39 vol 11 issue 1
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[galeid, pqid]
sort
titleAt the Forefront of a Post-Patriarchal Islamic Education Female Teachers in Indonesia
authorKull, Ann
creationdate20091101
lso0120091101
facets
frbrgroupid8763033355838414507
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2009
topic
0Islam
1Education
2Society
3Field Study
4Scholars
collection
0GenderWatch (Alumni edition)
1GenderWatch
2Social Science Database (Alumni edition)
3ProQuest Social Science Journals
4International Bibliography of the Social Sciences
5Publicly Available Content Database
6ProQuest Central
7International Bibliography of the Social Sciences (IBSS)
8ProQuest Business Collection
9ProQuest Politics Collection
10ProQuest Social Sciences Premium Collection
11ProQuest Sociology Collection
12ProQuest Central (new)
13ProQuest Central K-12
14ProQuest Central Korea
15Social Science Premium Collection
16ProQuest Central Essentials
17ProQuest Central China
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontribKull, Ann
jtitleJournal of International Women's Studies
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext_linktorsrc
addata
aulastKull
aufirstAnn
auinit1A.
auKull, Ann
atitleAt the Forefront of a Post-Patriarchal Islamic Education Female Teachers in Indonesia
jtitleJournal of International Women's Studies
risdate20091101
volume11
issue1
spage25
epage39
pages25-39
eissn15398706
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThis article argues that the ongoing introduction of a gender perspective in Indonesian Islamic education is challenging the partially unconscious patriarchal gender regime of these institutions and a means of resisting traditional notions of religious authority. The activities of female teachers, scholars and researchers are instrumental in these endeavors. This study draws on empirical material collected through fieldwork in Jakarta, Yogyakarta, Makassar, Banjarmasin, and Bandung, and includes brochures, books, course literature, research, interviews, and discussions. Data is primarily collected from state institutes for higher Islamic education and especially at their respective Centers for Women Studies. This material constitutes examples of how female, and male, religious scholars and teachers challenge the prevailing gender bias in Islamic education on all levels by introducing a gender perspective in curriculum, teaching, and textbooks, but also in their roles as exemplars and religious authorities. I argue that these measures are important in creating gender awareness among Muslim students. However, to successfully challenge the structures of Islamic education, several conditions have to be met: producing less gender-biased Islamic interpretations, an academic climate that is open to inclusion of these interpretations in Islamic education on various levels, increasing the number of female teachers, and sufficient economic funding. Some of these prerequisites are already being met in the case of Indonesia. [PUBLICATION ABSTRACT]
copBridgewater
pubBridgewater State College
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/232109168/
oafree_for_read
date2009-11-01