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Conservative Protestantism and Support for Corporal Punishment

Previous research has demonstrated that conservative Protestants disproportionately support the use of corporal punishment. Here, it is suggested that this reflects the impact of three components of religious ideology: (1) the acceptance of the doctrine of biblical literalism; (2) the conviction tha... Full description

Journal Title: American Sociological Review February 1993, Vol.58(1), pp.131-144
Main Author: Ellison, Christopher
Other Authors: Sherkat, Darren
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0003-1224
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/60058260/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest60058260
title: Conservative Protestantism and Support for Corporal Punishment
format: Article
creator:
  • Ellison, Christopher
  • Sherkat, Darren
subjects:
  • Corporal Punishment
  • Conservatism
  • Protestantism
  • Religious Beliefs
  • Sociology of Religion
  • Sociology of Religion
  • Mass Phenomena
  • Public Opinion
  • Article
  • Corporal Punishment Support-Conservative Protestanism Link
  • Religious Ideology Components
  • 1988 General Social Survey
ispartof: American Sociological Review, February 1993, Vol.58(1), pp.131-144
description: Previous research has demonstrated that conservative Protestants disproportionately support the use of corporal punishment. Here, it is suggested that this reflects the impact of three components of religious ideology: (1) the acceptance of the doctrine of biblical literalism; (2) the conviction that human nature (& hence the nature of young children) is inherently sinful; & (3) the belief that human sin demands punishment. These arguments about the religious roots of support for corporal punishment are evaluated using data from the 1988 General Social Survey (N = 988 respondents). Ordinary least squares regression & structural equation models generally confirm the theoretical model, & invite further research on how religious factors affect parental values & practices. 1 Table, 1 Figure, 85 References.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0003-1224
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00031224
  • 0003-1224
url: Link


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subjectCorporal Punishment ; Conservatism ; Protestantism ; Religious Beliefs ; Sociology of Religion; Sociology of Religion ; Mass Phenomena; Public Opinion ; Article ; Corporal Punishment Support-Conservative Protestanism Link ; Religious Ideology Components ; 1988 General Social Survey
descriptionPrevious research has demonstrated that conservative Protestants disproportionately support the use of corporal punishment. Here, it is suggested that this reflects the impact of three components of religious ideology: (1) the acceptance of the doctrine of biblical literalism; (2) the conviction that human nature (& hence the nature of young children) is inherently sinful; & (3) the belief that human sin demands punishment. These arguments about the religious roots of support for corporal punishment are evaluated using data from the 1988 General Social Survey (N = 988 respondents). Ordinary least squares regression & structural equation models generally confirm the theoretical model, & invite further research on how religious factors affect parental values & practices. 1 Table, 1 Figure, 85 References.
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abstractPrevious research has demonstrated that conservative Protestants disproportionately support the use of corporal punishment. Here, it is suggested that this reflects the impact of three components of religious ideology: (1) the acceptance of the doctrine of biblical literalism; (2) the conviction that human nature (& hence the nature of young children) is inherently sinful; & (3) the belief that human sin demands punishment. These arguments about the religious roots of support for corporal punishment are evaluated using data from the 1988 General Social Survey (N = 988 respondents). Ordinary least squares regression & structural equation models generally confirm the theoretical model, & invite further research on how religious factors affect parental values & practices. 1 Table, 1 Figure, 85 References.
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