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Dietary intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids in relation to long-term dementia risk.

BACKGROUNDGreater fish and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake may reduce dementia risk; however, previous studies have reported conflicting results, which were largely based on short-term follow-up. OBJECTIVEThe objective was to study the dietary consumption of fish and omega-3 P... Full description

Journal Title: The American journal of clinical nutrition July 2009, Vol.90(1), pp.170-176
Main Author: Devore, Elizabeth E
Other Authors: Grodstein, Francine , van Rooij, Frank J A , Hofman, Albert , Rosner, Bernard , Stampfer, Meir J , Witteman, Jacqueline C M , Breteler, Monique M B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.27037
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/67398338/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Dietary intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids in relation to long-term dementia risk.
format: Article
creator:
  • Devore, Elizabeth E
  • Grodstein, Francine
  • van Rooij, Frank J A
  • Hofman, Albert
  • Rosner, Bernard
  • Stampfer, Meir J
  • Witteman, Jacqueline C M
  • Breteler, Monique M B
subjects:
  • Aged–Epidemiology
  • Alzheimer Disease–Epidemiology
  • Animals–Metabolism
  • Cohort Studies–Metabolism
  • Dementia–Metabolism
  • Diet–Epidemiology
  • Docosahexaenoic Acids–Metabolism
  • Eicosapentaenoic Acid–Metabolism
  • Fatty Acids, Omega-3–Metabolism
  • Female–Metabolism
  • Fishes–Metabolism
  • Humans–Metabolism
  • Interviews As Topic–Metabolism
  • Life Style–Metabolism
  • Male–Metabolism
  • Meat–Metabolism
  • Middle Aged–Metabolism
  • Multivariate Analysis–Metabolism
  • Netherlands–Metabolism
  • Patient Selection–Metabolism
  • Proportional Hazards Models–Metabolism
  • Risk–Metabolism
  • Alpha-Linolenic Acid–Metabolism
  • Abridged
  • Fatty Acids, Omega-3
  • Alpha-Linolenic Acid
  • Docosahexaenoic Acids
  • Eicosapentaenoic Acid
ispartof: The American journal of clinical nutrition, July 2009, Vol.90(1), pp.170-176
description: BACKGROUNDGreater fish and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake may reduce dementia risk; however, previous studies have reported conflicting results, which were largely based on short-term follow-up. OBJECTIVEThe objective was to study the dietary consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs in relation to long-term dementia risk. DESIGNWe studied 5395 participants aged > or =55 y in the Rotterdam Study who were free of dementia and reported dietary information at baseline. We used age- and sex-adjusted Cox proportional hazard and multivariate-adjusted models to evaluate the relative risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) across categories of typical fish intake (none, low, and high) and fish type consumed (none, lean, and fatty). We also evaluated dementia and AD risk across tertiles of omega-3 PUFA intake, specifically, total long-chain omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), alpha-linolenic acid, and EPA and DHA individually. RESULTSDuring an average follow-up of 9.6 y, dementia developed in 465 participants (365 with a diagnosis of AD). In multivariate-adjusted models, total fish intake was unrelated to dementia risk (P for trend = 0.7). Compared with participants who typically ate no fish, those with a high fish intake had a similar dementia risk (hazard ratio: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.19), as did those who typically ate fatty fish (hazard ratio: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.24). Dietary intakes of omega-3 PUFAs were also not associated with dementia risk, and the results were similar when we considered AD specifically. CONCLUSIONIn this Dutch cohort, who had a moderate consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs, these dietary factors do not appear to be associated with long-term dementia risk.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 1938-3207 ; DOI: 10.3945/ajcn.2008.27037
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 19383207
  • 1938-3207
url: Link


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titleDietary intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids in relation to long-term dementia risk.
creatorDevore, Elizabeth E ; Grodstein, Francine ; van Rooij, Frank J A ; Hofman, Albert ; Rosner, Bernard ; Stampfer, Meir J ; Witteman, Jacqueline C M ; Breteler, Monique M B
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subjectAged–Epidemiology ; Alzheimer Disease–Epidemiology ; Animals–Metabolism ; Cohort Studies–Metabolism ; Dementia–Metabolism ; Diet–Epidemiology ; Docosahexaenoic Acids–Metabolism ; Eicosapentaenoic Acid–Metabolism ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3–Metabolism ; Female–Metabolism ; Fishes–Metabolism ; Humans–Metabolism ; Interviews As Topic–Metabolism ; Life Style–Metabolism ; Male–Metabolism ; Meat–Metabolism ; Middle Aged–Metabolism ; Multivariate Analysis–Metabolism ; Netherlands–Metabolism ; Patient Selection–Metabolism ; Proportional Hazards Models–Metabolism ; Risk–Metabolism ; Alpha-Linolenic Acid–Metabolism ; Abridged ; Fatty Acids, Omega-3 ; Alpha-Linolenic Acid ; Docosahexaenoic Acids ; Eicosapentaenoic Acid
descriptionBACKGROUNDGreater fish and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake may reduce dementia risk; however, previous studies have reported conflicting results, which were largely based on short-term follow-up. OBJECTIVEThe objective was to study the dietary consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs in relation to long-term dementia risk. DESIGNWe studied 5395 participants aged > or =55 y in the Rotterdam Study who were free of dementia and reported dietary information at baseline. We used age- and sex-adjusted Cox proportional hazard and multivariate-adjusted models to evaluate the relative risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) across categories of typical fish intake (none, low, and high) and fish type consumed (none, lean, and fatty). We also evaluated dementia and AD risk across tertiles of omega-3 PUFA intake, specifically, total long-chain omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), alpha-linolenic acid, and EPA and DHA individually. RESULTSDuring an average follow-up of 9.6 y, dementia developed in 465 participants (365 with a diagnosis of AD). In multivariate-adjusted models, total fish intake was unrelated to dementia risk (P for trend = 0.7). Compared with participants who typically ate no fish, those with a high fish intake had a similar dementia risk (hazard ratio: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.19), as did those who typically ate fatty fish (hazard ratio: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.24). Dietary intakes of omega-3 PUFAs were also not associated with dementia risk, and the results were similar when we considered AD specifically. CONCLUSIONIn this Dutch cohort, who had a moderate consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs, these dietary factors do not appear to be associated with long-term dementia risk.
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titleDietary intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids in relation to long-term dementia risk.
descriptionBACKGROUNDGreater fish and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake may reduce dementia risk; however, previous studies have reported conflicting results, which were largely based on short-term follow-up. OBJECTIVEThe objective was to study the dietary consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs in relation to long-term dementia risk. DESIGNWe studied 5395 participants aged > or =55 y in the Rotterdam Study who were free of dementia and reported dietary information at baseline. We used age- and sex-adjusted Cox proportional hazard and multivariate-adjusted models to evaluate the relative risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) across categories of typical fish intake (none, low, and high) and fish type consumed (none, lean, and fatty). We also evaluated dementia and AD risk across tertiles of omega-3 PUFA intake, specifically, total long-chain omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), alpha-linolenic acid, and EPA and DHA individually. RESULTSDuring an average follow-up of 9.6 y, dementia developed in 465 participants (365 with a diagnosis of AD). In multivariate-adjusted models, total fish intake was unrelated to dementia risk (P for trend = 0.7). Compared with participants who typically ate no fish, those with a high fish intake had a similar dementia risk (hazard ratio: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.19), as did those who typically ate fatty fish (hazard ratio: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.24). Dietary intakes of omega-3 PUFAs were also not associated with dementia risk, and the results were similar when we considered AD specifically. CONCLUSIONIn this Dutch cohort, who had a moderate consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs, these dietary factors do not appear to be associated with long-term dementia risk.
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13Life Style–Metabolism
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titleDietary intake of fish and omega-3 fatty acids in relation to long-term dementia risk.
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abstractBACKGROUNDGreater fish and omega-3 (n-3) polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) intake may reduce dementia risk; however, previous studies have reported conflicting results, which were largely based on short-term follow-up. OBJECTIVEThe objective was to study the dietary consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs in relation to long-term dementia risk. DESIGNWe studied 5395 participants aged > or =55 y in the Rotterdam Study who were free of dementia and reported dietary information at baseline. We used age- and sex-adjusted Cox proportional hazard and multivariate-adjusted models to evaluate the relative risk of dementia and Alzheimer disease (AD) across categories of typical fish intake (none, low, and high) and fish type consumed (none, lean, and fatty). We also evaluated dementia and AD risk across tertiles of omega-3 PUFA intake, specifically, total long-chain omega-3 fatty acids: eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) + docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), alpha-linolenic acid, and EPA and DHA individually. RESULTSDuring an average follow-up of 9.6 y, dementia developed in 465 participants (365 with a diagnosis of AD). In multivariate-adjusted models, total fish intake was unrelated to dementia risk (P for trend = 0.7). Compared with participants who typically ate no fish, those with a high fish intake had a similar dementia risk (hazard ratio: 0.95; 95% CI: 0.76, 1.19), as did those who typically ate fatty fish (hazard ratio: 0.98; 95% CI: 0.77, 1.24). Dietary intakes of omega-3 PUFAs were also not associated with dementia risk, and the results were similar when we considered AD specifically. CONCLUSIONIn this Dutch cohort, who had a moderate consumption of fish and omega-3 PUFAs, these dietary factors do not appear to be associated with long-term dementia risk.
doi10.3945/ajcn.2008.27037
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/67398338/
issn00029165
date2009-07-01