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Maternal depressive symptoms and infant health practices among low-income women.

OBJECTIVESTo determine the relationships between maternal depressive symptoms and the use of infant health services, parenting practices, and injury-prevention measures. METHODSA prospective, community-based survey of women attending Philadelphia public health centers between February 2000 and Novem... Full description

Journal Title: Pediatrics June 2004, Vol.113(6), pp.e523-e529
Main Author: Chung, Esther K
Other Authors: Mccollum, Kelly F , Elo, Irma T , Lee, Helen J , Culhane, Jennifer F
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
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ID: E-ISSN: 1098-4275
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/71976677/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Maternal depressive symptoms and infant health practices among low-income women.
format: Article
creator:
  • Chung, Esther K
  • Mccollum, Kelly F
  • Elo, Irma T
  • Lee, Helen J
  • Culhane, Jennifer F
subjects:
  • Adult–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • African Continental Ancestry Group–Ethnology
  • Child Health Services–Psychology
  • Depression–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Female–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Health Surveys–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Humans–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Infant–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Infant Welfare–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Mothers–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Parenting–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Poverty–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Preventive Health Services–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Socioeconomic Factors–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • United States–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Abridged
ispartof: Pediatrics, June 2004, Vol.113(6), pp.e523-e529
description: OBJECTIVESTo determine the relationships between maternal depressive symptoms and the use of infant health services, parenting practices, and injury-prevention measures. METHODSA prospective, community-based survey of women attending Philadelphia public health centers between February 2000 and November 2001 was conducted. Women were surveyed at 3 time points before and after parturition. Depressive symptoms were determined with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at each time point. We studied 6 outcomes, clustered into 3 categories: 1) infant health service use (adequate well-child care and ever being hospitalized); 2) parenting practices (breastfeeding for > or =1 month and use of corporal punishment); and 3) injury-prevention measures (having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position). RESULTSThe sample consisted of 774 largely single (74%), uninsured (63%), African American (65%) women, with a mean age of 24 +/- 6 years and a mean annual income of 8063 dollars. Forty-eight percent of women had depressive symptoms at 1 or 2 time points (ever symptoms) and 12% had depressive symptoms at all points (persistent symptoms). Compared with women who never had depressive symptoms (without symptoms), women with persistent symptoms were nearly 3 times as likely to have their child ever hospitalized (adjusted odds ratio: 2.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.61-5.07) and twice as likely to use corporal punishment (adjusted odds ratio: 1.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-3.34). Mothers with persistent depressive symptoms were nearly three-quarters less likely to have smoke alarms in their homes (adjusted odds ratio: 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.70) and one-half as likely to use the back sleep position (adjusted odds ratio: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.35-0.91), compared with women without symptoms. There was no association between maternal depressive symptoms and infant receipt of well-child care or the likelihood of breastfeeding for > or =1 month. CONCLUSIONSMaternal depressive symptoms persisting from the prepartum to postpartum periods were associated with increased risks of infant hospitalization and use of corporal punishment and with lower likelihood of having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position. Additional efforts are needed to identify and evaluate mothers with depressive symptoms to improve the health and safety of young infants.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1098-4275
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 10984275
  • 1098-4275
url: Link


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titleMaternal depressive symptoms and infant health practices among low-income women.
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descriptionOBJECTIVESTo determine the relationships between maternal depressive symptoms and the use of infant health services, parenting practices, and injury-prevention measures. METHODSA prospective, community-based survey of women attending Philadelphia public health centers between February 2000 and November 2001 was conducted. Women were surveyed at 3 time points before and after parturition. Depressive symptoms were determined with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at each time point. We studied 6 outcomes, clustered into 3 categories: 1) infant health service use (adequate well-child care and ever being hospitalized); 2) parenting practices (breastfeeding for > or =1 month and use of corporal punishment); and 3) injury-prevention measures (having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position). RESULTSThe sample consisted of 774 largely single (74%), uninsured (63%), African American (65%) women, with a mean age of 24 +/- 6 years and a mean annual income of 8063 dollars. Forty-eight percent of women had depressive symptoms at 1 or 2 time points (ever symptoms) and 12% had depressive symptoms at all points (persistent symptoms). Compared with women who never had depressive symptoms (without symptoms), women with persistent symptoms were nearly 3 times as likely to have their child ever hospitalized (adjusted odds ratio: 2.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.61-5.07) and twice as likely to use corporal punishment (adjusted odds ratio: 1.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-3.34). Mothers with persistent depressive symptoms were nearly three-quarters less likely to have smoke alarms in their homes (adjusted odds ratio: 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.70) and one-half as likely to use the back sleep position (adjusted odds ratio: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.35-0.91), compared with women without symptoms. There was no association between maternal depressive symptoms and infant receipt of well-child care or the likelihood of breastfeeding for > or =1 month. CONCLUSIONSMaternal depressive symptoms persisting from the prepartum to postpartum periods were associated with increased risks of infant hospitalization and use of corporal punishment and with lower likelihood of having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position. Additional efforts are needed to identify and evaluate mothers with depressive symptoms to improve the health and safety of young infants.
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descriptionOBJECTIVESTo determine the relationships between maternal depressive symptoms and the use of infant health services, parenting practices, and injury-prevention measures. METHODSA prospective, community-based survey of women attending Philadelphia public health centers between February 2000 and November 2001 was conducted. Women were surveyed at 3 time points before and after parturition. Depressive symptoms were determined with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at each time point. We studied 6 outcomes, clustered into 3 categories: 1) infant health service use (adequate well-child care and ever being hospitalized); 2) parenting practices (breastfeeding for > or =1 month and use of corporal punishment); and 3) injury-prevention measures (having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position). RESULTSThe sample consisted of 774 largely single (74%), uninsured (63%), African American (65%) women, with a mean age of 24 +/- 6 years and a mean annual income of 8063 dollars. Forty-eight percent of women had depressive symptoms at 1 or 2 time points (ever symptoms) and 12% had depressive symptoms at all points (persistent symptoms). Compared with women who never had depressive symptoms (without symptoms), women with persistent symptoms were nearly 3 times as likely to have their child ever hospitalized (adjusted odds ratio: 2.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.61-5.07) and twice as likely to use corporal punishment (adjusted odds ratio: 1.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-3.34). Mothers with persistent depressive symptoms were nearly three-quarters less likely to have smoke alarms in their homes (adjusted odds ratio: 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.70) and one-half as likely to use the back sleep position (adjusted odds ratio: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.35-0.91), compared with women without symptoms. There was no association between maternal depressive symptoms and infant receipt of well-child care or the likelihood of breastfeeding for > or =1 month. CONCLUSIONSMaternal depressive symptoms persisting from the prepartum to postpartum periods were associated with increased risks of infant hospitalization and use of corporal punishment and with lower likelihood of having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position. Additional efforts are needed to identify and evaluate mothers with depressive symptoms to improve the health and safety of young infants.
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abstractOBJECTIVESTo determine the relationships between maternal depressive symptoms and the use of infant health services, parenting practices, and injury-prevention measures. METHODSA prospective, community-based survey of women attending Philadelphia public health centers between February 2000 and November 2001 was conducted. Women were surveyed at 3 time points before and after parturition. Depressive symptoms were determined with the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale at each time point. We studied 6 outcomes, clustered into 3 categories: 1) infant health service use (adequate well-child care and ever being hospitalized); 2) parenting practices (breastfeeding for > or =1 month and use of corporal punishment); and 3) injury-prevention measures (having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position). RESULTSThe sample consisted of 774 largely single (74%), uninsured (63%), African American (65%) women, with a mean age of 24 +/- 6 years and a mean annual income of 8063 dollars. Forty-eight percent of women had depressive symptoms at 1 or 2 time points (ever symptoms) and 12% had depressive symptoms at all points (persistent symptoms). Compared with women who never had depressive symptoms (without symptoms), women with persistent symptoms were nearly 3 times as likely to have their child ever hospitalized (adjusted odds ratio: 2.89; 95% confidence interval: 1.61-5.07) and twice as likely to use corporal punishment (adjusted odds ratio: 1.90; 95% confidence interval: 1.08-3.34). Mothers with persistent depressive symptoms were nearly three-quarters less likely to have smoke alarms in their homes (adjusted odds ratio: 0.28; 95% confidence interval: 0.11-0.70) and one-half as likely to use the back sleep position (adjusted odds ratio: 0.56; 95% confidence interval: 0.35-0.91), compared with women without symptoms. There was no association between maternal depressive symptoms and infant receipt of well-child care or the likelihood of breastfeeding for > or =1 month. CONCLUSIONSMaternal depressive symptoms persisting from the prepartum to postpartum periods were associated with increased risks of infant hospitalization and use of corporal punishment and with lower likelihood of having a smoke alarm and using the back sleep position. Additional efforts are needed to identify and evaluate mothers with depressive symptoms to improve the health and safety of young infants.
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/71976677/
doi10.1542/peds.113.6.e523
issn00314005
date2004-06-01