schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Alcohol consumption and mortality among women.

BACKGROUNDStudies in men suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a reduction in overall mortality, due primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Among women with similar levels of alcohol consumption, an increased risk of breast cancer has been noted that compli... Full description

Journal Title: The New England journal of medicine May 11, 1995, Vol.332(19), pp.1245-1250
Main Author: Fuchs, C S
Other Authors: Stampfer, M J , Colditz, G A , Giovannucci, E L , Manson, J E , Kawachi, I , Hunter, D J , Hankinson, S E , Hennekens, C H , Rosner, B
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0028-4793
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/77212882/?pq-origsite=primo
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: proquest77212882
title: Alcohol consumption and mortality among women.
format: Article
creator:
  • Fuchs, C S
  • Stampfer, M J
  • Colditz, G A
  • Giovannucci, E L
  • Manson, J E
  • Kawachi, I
  • Hunter, D J
  • Hankinson, S E
  • Hennekens, C H
  • Rosner, B
subjects:
  • Adult–Epidemiology
  • Alcohol Drinking–Mortality
  • Cardiovascular Diseases–Mortality
  • Cause of Death–Statistics & Numerical Data
  • Diet–Mortality
  • Female–Mortality
  • Follow-Up Studies–Mortality
  • Humans–Mortality
  • Middle Aged–Mortality
  • Neoplasms–Mortality
  • Prospective Studies–Mortality
  • Risk–Mortality
  • Abridged
ispartof: The New England journal of medicine, May 11, 1995, Vol.332(19), pp.1245-1250
description: BACKGROUNDStudies in men suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a reduction in overall mortality, due primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Among women with similar levels of alcohol consumption, an increased risk of breast cancer has been noted that complicates the balance of risks and benefits. METHODSWe conducted a prospective study among 85,709 women, 34 to 59 years of age and without a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, or cancer, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1980. During the 12-year follow-up period, 2658 deaths were documented. RESULTSThe relative risks of death in drinkers as compared with nondrinkers were 0.83 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.74 to 0.93) for women who consumed 1.5 to 4.9 g of alcohol per day (one to three drinks per week), 0.88 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 0.98) for those who consumed 5.0 to 29.9 g per day, and 1.19 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.38) for those who consumed 30 g or more per day, after adjustment for other predictors of mortality. Light-to-moderate drinking (1.5 to 29.9 g per day) was associated with a decreased risk of death from cardiovascular disease; heavier drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from other causes, particularly breast cancer and cirrhosis. The benefit associated with light-to-moderate drinking was most apparent among women with risk factors for coronary heart disease and those 50 years of age or older. CONCLUSIONSAmong women, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced mortality rate, but this apparent survival benefit appears largely confined to women at greater risk for coronary heart disease.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0028-4793
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00284793
  • 0028-4793
url: Link


@attributes
ID1239009561
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid77212882
sourceidproquest
recordidTN_proquest77212882
sourcesystemOther
pqid77212882
galeid16826133
display
typearticle
titleAlcohol consumption and mortality among women.
creatorFuchs, C S ; Stampfer, M J ; Colditz, G A ; Giovannucci, E L ; Manson, J E ; Kawachi, I ; Hunter, D J ; Hankinson, S E ; Hennekens, C H ; Rosner, B
contributorFuchs, C S (correspondence author) ; Fuchs, C S (record owner)
ispartofThe New England journal of medicine, May 11, 1995, Vol.332(19), pp.1245-1250
identifierISSN: 0028-4793
subjectAdult–Epidemiology ; Alcohol Drinking–Mortality ; Cardiovascular Diseases–Mortality ; Cause of Death–Statistics & Numerical Data ; Diet–Mortality ; Female–Mortality ; Follow-Up Studies–Mortality ; Humans–Mortality ; Middle Aged–Mortality ; Neoplasms–Mortality ; Prospective Studies–Mortality ; Risk–Mortality ; Abridged
descriptionBACKGROUNDStudies in men suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a reduction in overall mortality, due primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Among women with similar levels of alcohol consumption, an increased risk of breast cancer has been noted that complicates the balance of risks and benefits. METHODSWe conducted a prospective study among 85,709 women, 34 to 59 years of age and without a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, or cancer, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1980. During the 12-year follow-up period, 2658 deaths were documented. RESULTSThe relative risks of death in drinkers as compared with nondrinkers were 0.83 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.74 to 0.93) for women who consumed 1.5 to 4.9 g of alcohol per day (one to three drinks per week), 0.88 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 0.98) for those who consumed 5.0 to 29.9 g per day, and 1.19 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.38) for those who consumed 30 g or more per day, after adjustment for other predictors of mortality. Light-to-moderate drinking (1.5 to 29.9 g per day) was associated with a decreased risk of death from cardiovascular disease; heavier drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from other causes, particularly breast cancer and cirrhosis. The benefit associated with light-to-moderate drinking was most apparent among women with risk factors for coronary heart disease and those 50 years of age or older. CONCLUSIONSAmong women, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced mortality rate, but this apparent survival benefit appears largely confined to women at greater risk for coronary heart disease.
languageeng
source
version9
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/77212882/?pq-origsite=primo$$EView_record_in_ProQuest_(subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Fuchs, C S
1Stampfer, M J
2Colditz, G A
3Giovannucci, E L
4Manson, J E
5Kawachi, I
6Hunter, D J
7Hankinson, S E
8Hennekens, C H
9Rosner, B
titleAlcohol consumption and mortality among women.
descriptionBACKGROUNDStudies in men suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a reduction in overall mortality, due primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Among women with similar levels of alcohol consumption, an increased risk of breast cancer has been noted that complicates the balance of risks and benefits. METHODSWe conducted a prospective study among 85,709 women, 34 to 59 years of age and without a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, or cancer, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1980. During the 12-year follow-up period, 2658 deaths were documented. RESULTSThe relative risks of death in drinkers as compared with nondrinkers were 0.83 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.74 to 0.93) for women who consumed 1.5 to 4.9 g of alcohol per day (one to three drinks per week), 0.88 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 0.98) for those who consumed 5.0 to 29.9 g per day, and 1.19 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.38) for those who consumed 30 g or more per day, after adjustment for other predictors of mortality. Light-to-moderate drinking (1.5 to 29.9 g per day) was associated with a decreased risk of death from cardiovascular disease; heavier drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from other causes, particularly breast cancer and cirrhosis. The benefit associated with light-to-moderate drinking was most apparent among women with risk factors for coronary heart disease and those 50 years of age or older. CONCLUSIONSAmong women, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced mortality rate, but this apparent survival benefit appears largely confined to women at greater risk for coronary heart disease.
subject
0Adult–Epidemiology
1Alcohol Drinking–Mortality
2Cardiovascular Diseases–Mortality
3Cause of Death–Statistics & Numerical Data
4Diet–Mortality
5Female–Mortality
6Follow-Up Studies–Mortality
7Humans–Mortality
8Middle Aged–Mortality
9Neoplasms–Mortality
10Prospective Studies–Mortality
11Risk–Mortality
12Abridged
general
0English
1MEDLINE (ProQuest)
2ProQuest Biological Science Collection
3ProQuest Natural Science Collection
4ProQuest SciTech Collection
5Biological Science Database
6Natural Science Collection
7SciTech Premium Collection
8Health Research Premium Collection
9Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
sourceidproquest
recordidproquest77212882
issn
000284793
10028-4793
rsrctypearticle
creationdate1995
addtitleThe New England journal of medicine
searchscope
01007527
11007944
210000004
310000038
410000050
510000120
610000159
710000238
810000253
910000260
1010000270
1110000271
1210000302
13proquest
scope
01007527
11007944
210000004
310000038
410000050
510000120
610000159
710000238
810000253
910000260
1010000270
1110000271
1210000302
13proquest
lsr43
01007527false
11007944false
210000004false
310000038false
410000050false
510000120false
610000159false
710000238false
810000253false
910000260false
1010000270false
1110000271false
1210000302false
contributorFuchs, C S
startdate19950511
enddate19950511
citationpf 1245 pt 1250 vol 332 issue 19
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, doi, eissn, galeid]
sort
titleAlcohol consumption and mortality among women.
authorFuchs, C S ; Stampfer, M J ; Colditz, G A ; Giovannucci, E L ; Manson, J E ; Kawachi, I ; Hunter, D J ; Hankinson, S E ; Hennekens, C H ; Rosner, B
creationdate19950511
lso0119950511
facets
frbrgroupid7750471040132497793
frbrtype5
newrecords20181218
languageeng
creationdate1995
topic
0Adult–Epidemiology
1Alcohol Drinking–Mortality
2Cardiovascular Diseases–Mortality
3Cause of Death–Statistics & Numerical Data
4Diet–Mortality
5Female–Mortality
6Follow-Up Studies–Mortality
7Humans–Mortality
8Middle Aged–Mortality
9Neoplasms–Mortality
10Prospective Studies–Mortality
11Risk–Mortality
12Abridged
collection
0MEDLINE (ProQuest)
1ProQuest Biological Science Collection
2ProQuest Natural Science Collection
3ProQuest SciTech Collection
4Biological Science Database
5Natural Science Collection
6SciTech Premium Collection
7Health Research Premium Collection
8Health Research Premium Collection (Alumni edition)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Fuchs, C S
1Stampfer, M J
2Colditz, G A
3Giovannucci, E L
4Manson, J E
5Kawachi, I
6Hunter, D J
7Hankinson, S E
8Hennekens, C H
9Rosner, B
jtitleNew England journal of medicine
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Fuchs
1Stampfer
2Colditz
3Giovannucci
4Manson
5Kawachi
6Hunter
7Hankinson
8Hennekens
9Rosner
aufirst
0C S
1M J
2G A
3E L
4J E
5I
6D J
7S E
8C H
9B
au
0Fuchs, C S
1Stampfer, M J
2Colditz, G A
3Giovannucci, E L
4Manson, J E
5Kawachi, I
6Hunter, D J
7Hankinson, S E
8Hennekens, C H
9Rosner, B
addauFuchs, C S
atitleAlcohol consumption and mortality among women.
jtitleThe New England journal of medicine
risdate19950511
volume332
issue19
spage1245
epage1250
pages1245-1250
issn0028-4793
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractBACKGROUNDStudies in men suggest that light-to-moderate alcohol intake is associated with a reduction in overall mortality, due primarily to a reduced risk of coronary heart disease. Among women with similar levels of alcohol consumption, an increased risk of breast cancer has been noted that complicates the balance of risks and benefits. METHODSWe conducted a prospective study among 85,709 women, 34 to 59 years of age and without a history of myocardial infarction, angina, stroke, or cancer, who completed a dietary questionnaire in 1980. During the 12-year follow-up period, 2658 deaths were documented. RESULTSThe relative risks of death in drinkers as compared with nondrinkers were 0.83 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.74 to 0.93) for women who consumed 1.5 to 4.9 g of alcohol per day (one to three drinks per week), 0.88 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.80 to 0.98) for those who consumed 5.0 to 29.9 g per day, and 1.19 (95 percent confidence interval, 1.02 to 1.38) for those who consumed 30 g or more per day, after adjustment for other predictors of mortality. Light-to-moderate drinking (1.5 to 29.9 g per day) was associated with a decreased risk of death from cardiovascular disease; heavier drinking was associated with an increased risk of death from other causes, particularly breast cancer and cirrhosis. The benefit associated with light-to-moderate drinking was most apparent among women with risk factors for coronary heart disease and those 50 years of age or older. CONCLUSIONSAmong women, light-to-moderate alcohol consumption is associated with a reduced mortality rate, but this apparent survival benefit appears largely confined to women at greater risk for coronary heart disease.
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/77212882/
doi10.1056/NEJM199505113321901
eissn15334406
date1995-05-11