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Variation in resource consumption across a gradient of increasing intra- and interspecific richness

Based on the premise that ecosystems with more species will function at more efficient rates, declining biodiversity is expected to alter important ecosystem functions, goods, and services across the globe. However, applicability of this general hypothesis to genetic or clonal richness in assemblage... Full description

Journal Title: Ecology Jun 2011, Vol.92(6), pp.1226-1235
Main Author: Hargrave, C
Other Authors: Hambright, K , Weider, L
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0012-9658
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/888116327/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: Variation in resource consumption across a gradient of increasing intra- and interspecific richness
format: Article
creator:
  • Hargrave, C
  • Hambright, K
  • Weider, L
subjects:
  • Feeding
  • Adaptations
  • Biodiversity
  • Genetic Diversity
  • Biological Diversity
  • Consumers
  • Competition
  • Species Richness
  • Ecosystems
  • Species Richness
  • Feeding
  • Biological Diversity
  • Taxa
  • Resource Consumption
  • Competition
  • Adaptability
  • Daphnia
  • Issues in Sustainable Development
  • Ecosystem and Ecology Studies
ispartof: Ecology, Jun 2011, Vol.92(6), pp.1226-1235
description: Based on the premise that ecosystems with more species will function at more efficient rates, declining biodiversity is expected to alter important ecosystem functions, goods, and services across the globe. However, applicability of this general hypothesis to genetic or clonal richness in assemblages composed of few species is understudied. This illustrates the need to expand the focus of biodiversity-ecosystem-function experiments across all levels of biological diversity (including genetic). To explore this generality, we manipulated intraspecific (clonal) and interspecific (species) richness of a primary consumer, Daphnia, and measured assemblage feeding rate and total resource consumption. Our results snowed that greater clonal richness had no effect on Daphnia feeding, and greater species richness decreased feeding-related effects of Daphnia. This suggests that multiclonal Daphnia assemblages may be no more efficient at consuming resources than monocultures, and that monocultures of Daphnia may consume resources more efficiently than more species-rich assemblages. The inhibitory effect of increasing richness observed in this study resulted from chemical and mechanical interference among some of the Daphnia taxa. This suggests that consumer-mediated ecosystem functions could be reduced when assemblages include taxa equipped with adaptations for interference competition.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0012-9658
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 00129658
  • 0012-9658
url: Link


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titleVariation in resource consumption across a gradient of increasing intra- and interspecific richness
creatorHargrave, C ; Hambright, K ; Weider, L
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ispartofEcology, Jun 2011, Vol.92(6), pp.1226-1235
identifierISSN: 0012-9658
subjectFeeding ; Adaptations ; Biodiversity ; Genetic Diversity ; Biological Diversity ; Consumers ; Competition ; Species Richness ; Ecosystems ; Species Richness ; Feeding ; Biological Diversity ; Taxa ; Resource Consumption ; Competition ; Adaptability ; Daphnia ; Issues in Sustainable Development ; Ecosystem and Ecology Studies
descriptionBased on the premise that ecosystems with more species will function at more efficient rates, declining biodiversity is expected to alter important ecosystem functions, goods, and services across the globe. However, applicability of this general hypothesis to genetic or clonal richness in assemblages composed of few species is understudied. This illustrates the need to expand the focus of biodiversity-ecosystem-function experiments across all levels of biological diversity (including genetic). To explore this generality, we manipulated intraspecific (clonal) and interspecific (species) richness of a primary consumer, Daphnia, and measured assemblage feeding rate and total resource consumption. Our results snowed that greater clonal richness had no effect on Daphnia feeding, and greater species richness decreased feeding-related effects of Daphnia. This suggests that multiclonal Daphnia assemblages may be no more efficient at consuming resources than monocultures, and that monocultures of Daphnia may consume resources more efficiently than more species-rich assemblages. The inhibitory effect of increasing richness observed in this study resulted from chemical and mechanical interference among some of the Daphnia taxa. This suggests that consumer-mediated ecosystem functions could be reduced when assemblages include taxa equipped with adaptations for interference competition.
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abstractBased on the premise that ecosystems with more species will function at more efficient rates, declining biodiversity is expected to alter important ecosystem functions, goods, and services across the globe. However, applicability of this general hypothesis to genetic or clonal richness in assemblages composed of few species is understudied. This illustrates the need to expand the focus of biodiversity-ecosystem-function experiments across all levels of biological diversity (including genetic). To explore this generality, we manipulated intraspecific (clonal) and interspecific (species) richness of a primary consumer, Daphnia, and measured assemblage feeding rate and total resource consumption. Our results snowed that greater clonal richness had no effect on Daphnia feeding, and greater species richness decreased feeding-related effects of Daphnia. This suggests that multiclonal Daphnia assemblages may be no more efficient at consuming resources than monocultures, and that monocultures of Daphnia may consume resources more efficiently than more species-rich assemblages. The inhibitory effect of increasing richness observed in this study resulted from chemical and mechanical interference among some of the Daphnia taxa. This suggests that consumer-mediated ecosystem functions could be reduced when assemblages include taxa equipped with adaptations for interference competition.
urlhttp://search.proquest.com/docview/888116327/
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eissn19399170
date2011-06-01