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Civility: Between Disciplined Interaction and Local/Translocal Connectedness

This study explores the question of if and how associative bonds based on violence, control and self-restraint mediated by contractual relationships become institutionalised within societies and discusses the cultural factors that determine this threshold. It investigates the trade-off between forma... Full description

Journal Title: Third World Quarterly June 2011, Vol.32(5), pp.807-825
Main Author: Salvatore, Armando
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0143-6597 ; DOI: 10.1080/01436597.2011.578953
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/902073808/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest902073808
title: Civility: Between Disciplined Interaction and Local/Translocal Connectedness
format: Article
creator:
  • Salvatore, Armando
subjects:
  • Interaction
  • Islam
  • Governance
  • Weber, Max
  • Sociocultural Factors
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Anxiety
  • Participation
  • Turkey
  • Political Economy
  • Political Economy
  • Article
ispartof: Third World Quarterly, June 2011, Vol.32(5), pp.807-825
description: This study explores the question of if and how associative bonds based on violence, control and self-restraint mediated by contractual relationships become institutionalised within societies and discusses the cultural factors that determine this threshold. It investigates the trade-off between formalised forms of interaction that safeguard individual rights and secure state control, and less formal modes of civility that deepen trans-state interconnectedness. It asks whether civility is the result of a global civilising process in the sense highlighted by Norbert Elias, whereby affect control is matched by formal norms guaranteed by legitimate institutions, or whether it is rather the much more complex constellation of specific actualisations of the more general trade-off as just defined. After summarising the current twists of the meaning of civility against the background of liberal and modernist precedents and delineating the alternative patterns of civility within Islamic, especially modern Ottoman, history, the analysis critically interrogates Weber's notion of Verbruderung as the pre-modern root concept of organised forms of common action, mutual solidarity and civic participation. Finally, it questions whether this idea fits the historic forms of association in the Islamic world, in particular the privileging of a lower threshold of institutionalisation of the associational bond than has traditionally been found in the European experience-and which survives in the current anxieties about resurgent mahalle (neighbourhood) informal governance in the AKP's Turkey. Adapted from the source document.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0143-6597 ; DOI: 10.1080/01436597.2011.578953
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 01436597
  • 0143-6597
url: Link


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ispartofThird World Quarterly, June 2011, Vol.32(5), pp.807-825
identifierISSN: 0143-6597 ; DOI: 10.1080/01436597.2011.578953
subjectInteraction ; Islam ; Governance ; Weber, Max ; Sociocultural Factors ; Ottoman Empire ; Anxiety ; Participation ; Turkey ; Political Economy; Political Economy ; Article
descriptionThis study explores the question of if and how associative bonds based on violence, control and self-restraint mediated by contractual relationships become institutionalised within societies and discusses the cultural factors that determine this threshold. It investigates the trade-off between formalised forms of interaction that safeguard individual rights and secure state control, and less formal modes of civility that deepen trans-state interconnectedness. It asks whether civility is the result of a global civilising process in the sense highlighted by Norbert Elias, whereby affect control is matched by formal norms guaranteed by legitimate institutions, or whether it is rather the much more complex constellation of specific actualisations of the more general trade-off as just defined. After summarising the current twists of the meaning of civility against the background of liberal and modernist precedents and delineating the alternative patterns of civility within Islamic, especially modern Ottoman, history, the analysis critically interrogates Weber's notion of Verbruderung as the pre-modern root concept of organised forms of common action, mutual solidarity and civic participation. Finally, it questions whether this idea fits the historic forms of association in the Islamic world, in particular the privileging of a lower threshold of institutionalisation of the associational bond than has traditionally been found in the European experience-and which survives in the current anxieties about resurgent mahalle (neighbourhood) informal governance in the AKP's Turkey. Adapted from the source document.
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abstractThis study explores the question of if and how associative bonds based on violence, control and self-restraint mediated by contractual relationships become institutionalised within societies and discusses the cultural factors that determine this threshold. It investigates the trade-off between formalised forms of interaction that safeguard individual rights and secure state control, and less formal modes of civility that deepen trans-state interconnectedness. It asks whether civility is the result of a global civilising process in the sense highlighted by Norbert Elias, whereby affect control is matched by formal norms guaranteed by legitimate institutions, or whether it is rather the much more complex constellation of specific actualisations of the more general trade-off as just defined. After summarising the current twists of the meaning of civility against the background of liberal and modernist precedents and delineating the alternative patterns of civility within Islamic, especially modern Ottoman, history, the analysis critically interrogates Weber's notion of Verbruderung as the pre-modern root concept of organised forms of common action, mutual solidarity and civic participation. Finally, it questions whether this idea fits the historic forms of association in the Islamic world, in particular the privileging of a lower threshold of institutionalisation of the associational bond than has traditionally been found in the European experience-and which survives in the current anxieties about resurgent mahalle (neighbourhood) informal governance in the AKP's Turkey. Adapted from the source document.
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date2011-06-01