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Acute vision in the giant Cambrian predator Anomalocaris and the origin of compound eyes.

Until recently, intricate details of the optical design of non-biomineralized arthropod eyes remained elusive in Cambrian Burgess-Shale-type deposits, despite exceptional preservation of soft-part anatomy in such Konservat-Lagerstätten. The structure and development of ommatidia in arthropod compoun... Full description

Journal Title: Nature December 7, 2011, Vol.480(7376), pp.237-240
Main Author: Paterson, John R
Other Authors: García-Bellido, Diego C , Lee, Michael S Y , Brock, Glenn A , Jago, James B , Edgecombe, Gregory D
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 1476-4687 ; DOI: 10.1038/nature10689
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/911940616/?pq-origsite=primo
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recordid: proquest911940616
title: Acute vision in the giant Cambrian predator Anomalocaris and the origin of compound eyes.
format: Article
creator:
  • Paterson, John R
  • García-Bellido, Diego C
  • Lee, Michael S Y
  • Brock, Glenn A
  • Jago, James B
  • Edgecombe, Gregory D
subjects:
  • Animals–Anatomy & Histology
  • Arthropods–Physiology
  • Australia–Anatomy & Histology
  • Biological Evolution–Physiology
  • Compound Eye, Arthropod–Physiology
  • Extinction, Biological–Physiology
  • Fossils–Physiology
  • Geologic Sediments–Physiology
  • History, Ancient–Physiology
  • Predatory Behavior–Physiology
  • Vision, Ocular–Physiology
ispartof: Nature, December 7, 2011, Vol.480(7376), pp.237-240
description: Until recently, intricate details of the optical design of non-biomineralized arthropod eyes remained elusive in Cambrian Burgess-Shale-type deposits, despite exceptional preservation of soft-part anatomy in such Konservat-Lagerstätten. The structure and development of ommatidia in arthropod compound eyes support a single origin some time before the latest common ancestor of crown-group arthropods, but the appearance of compound eyes in the arthropod stem group has been poorly constrained in the absence of adequate fossils. Here we report 2-3-cm paired eyes from the early Cambrian (approximately 515 million years old) Emu Bay Shale of South Australia, assigned to the Cambrian apex predator Anomalocaris. Their preserved visual surfaces are composed of at least 16,000 hexagonally packed ommatidial lenses (in a single eye), rivalling the most acute compound eyes in modern arthropods. The specimens show two distinct taphonomic modes, preserved as iron oxide (after pyrite) and calcium phosphate,...
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 1476-4687 ; DOI: 10.1038/nature10689
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 14764687
  • 1476-4687
url: Link


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titleAcute vision in the giant Cambrian predator Anomalocaris and the origin of compound eyes.
creatorPaterson, John R ; García-Bellido, Diego C ; Lee, Michael S Y ; Brock, Glenn A ; Jago, James B ; Edgecombe, Gregory D
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ispartofNature, December 7, 2011, Vol.480(7376), pp.237-240
identifierE-ISSN: 1476-4687 ; DOI: 10.1038/nature10689
subjectAnimals–Anatomy & Histology ; Arthropods–Physiology ; Australia–Anatomy & Histology ; Biological Evolution–Physiology ; Compound Eye, Arthropod–Physiology ; Extinction, Biological–Physiology ; Fossils–Physiology ; Geologic Sediments–Physiology ; History, Ancient–Physiology ; Predatory Behavior–Physiology ; Vision, Ocular–Physiology
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descriptionUntil recently, intricate details of the optical design of non-biomineralized arthropod eyes remained elusive in Cambrian Burgess-Shale-type deposits, despite exceptional preservation of soft-part anatomy in such Konservat-Lagerstätten. The structure and development of ommatidia in arthropod compound eyes support a single origin some time before the latest common ancestor of crown-group arthropods, but the appearance of compound eyes in the arthropod stem group has been poorly constrained in the absence of adequate fossils. Here we report 2-3-cm paired eyes from the early Cambrian (approximately 515 million years old) Emu Bay Shale of South Australia, assigned to the Cambrian apex predator Anomalocaris. Their preserved visual surfaces are composed of at least 16,000 hexagonally packed ommatidial lenses (in a single eye), rivalling the most acute compound eyes in modern arthropods. The specimens show two distinct taphonomic modes, preserved as iron oxide (after pyrite) and calcium phosphate,...
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