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The role of migration in the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents in the USA

Nearly one out of every four children in the US is a child of immigrants. Yet few studies have assessed how factors at various stages of migration contribute to the development of health problems in immigrant populations. Most focus only on post-migration factors influencing health. Using data from... Full description

Journal Title: Social Science & Medicine October 2011, Vol.73(8), pp.1169-1177
Main Author: Ornelas, India
Other Authors: Perreira, Krista
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.002
Link: http://search.proquest.com/docview/964198231/?pq-origsite=primo
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title: The role of migration in the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents in the USA
format: Article
creator:
  • Ornelas, India
  • Perreira, Krista
subjects:
  • Migration
  • Immigrants
  • Hispanic Americans
  • Depression (Psychology)
  • Health Problems
  • Children
  • Parents
  • Social Support
  • Neighborhoods
  • Sociology of Health and Medicine
  • Sociology of Medicine & Health Care
  • USA Migration Family Latino Hispanic Immigrant Depression Acculturation
  • Article
ispartof: Social Science & Medicine, October 2011, Vol.73(8), pp.1169-1177
description: Nearly one out of every four children in the US is a child of immigrants. Yet few studies have assessed how factors at various stages of migration contribute to the development of health problems in immigrant populations. Most focus only on post-migration factors influencing health. Using data from the Latino Adolescent Migration, Health, and Adaptation Project, this study assessed the extent to which pre-migration (e.g., major life events, high poverty), migration (e.g., unsafe and stressful migration experiences), post-migration (e.g., discrimination, neighborhood factors, family reunification, linguistic isolation), and social support factors contributed to depressive symptoms among a sample of Latino immigrant parents with children ages 12-18. Results indicated that high poverty levels prior to migration, stressful experiences during migration, as well as racial problems in the neighborhood and racial/ethnic discrimination upon settlement in the US most strongly contribute to the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents. Family reunification, social support, and familism reduce the likelihood of depressive symptoms. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.002
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 02779536
  • 0277-9536
url: Link


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titleThe role of migration in the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents in the USA
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ispartofSocial Science & Medicine, October 2011, Vol.73(8), pp.1169-1177
identifierISSN: 0277-9536 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.socscimed.2011.07.002
subjectMigration ; Immigrants ; Hispanic Americans ; Depression (Psychology) ; Health Problems ; Children ; Parents ; Social Support ; Neighborhoods ; Sociology of Health and Medicine; Sociology of Medicine & Health Care ; USA Migration Family Latino Hispanic Immigrant Depression Acculturation ; Article
descriptionNearly one out of every four children in the US is a child of immigrants. Yet few studies have assessed how factors at various stages of migration contribute to the development of health problems in immigrant populations. Most focus only on post-migration factors influencing health. Using data from the Latino Adolescent Migration, Health, and Adaptation Project, this study assessed the extent to which pre-migration (e.g., major life events, high poverty), migration (e.g., unsafe and stressful migration experiences), post-migration (e.g., discrimination, neighborhood factors, family reunification, linguistic isolation), and social support factors contributed to depressive symptoms among a sample of Latino immigrant parents with children ages 12-18. Results indicated that high poverty levels prior to migration, stressful experiences during migration, as well as racial problems in the neighborhood and racial/ethnic discrimination upon settlement in the US most strongly contribute to the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents. Family reunification, social support, and familism reduce the likelihood of depressive symptoms. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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abstractNearly one out of every four children in the US is a child of immigrants. Yet few studies have assessed how factors at various stages of migration contribute to the development of health problems in immigrant populations. Most focus only on post-migration factors influencing health. Using data from the Latino Adolescent Migration, Health, and Adaptation Project, this study assessed the extent to which pre-migration (e.g., major life events, high poverty), migration (e.g., unsafe and stressful migration experiences), post-migration (e.g., discrimination, neighborhood factors, family reunification, linguistic isolation), and social support factors contributed to depressive symptoms among a sample of Latino immigrant parents with children ages 12-18. Results indicated that high poverty levels prior to migration, stressful experiences during migration, as well as racial problems in the neighborhood and racial/ethnic discrimination upon settlement in the US most strongly contribute to the development of depressive symptoms among Latino immigrant parents. Family reunification, social support, and familism reduce the likelihood of depressive symptoms. [Copyright Elsevier Ltd.]
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date2011-10-01