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Glutathione S-Transferase Polymorphism Interactions with Smoking Status and HPV Infection in Cervical Cancer Risk: An Evidence-Based Meta-Analysis

Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the major cause of cervical cancer (CC), but a number of infected women do not develop invasive lesions, suggesting the role of genetic susceptibility and environmental co-factors for cancer outbreak. Glutathione S- transferases (GSTs) ar... Full description

Journal Title: PLoS ONE 2013, Vol.8(12)
Main Author: Zhen, Shuai
Other Authors: Hu, Chen-Ming , Bian, Li-Hong
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083497 ; PMCID: 3877062 ; PMID: 24391774
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title: Glutathione S-Transferase Polymorphism Interactions with Smoking Status and HPV Infection in Cervical Cancer Risk: An Evidence-Based Meta-Analysis
format: Article
creator:
  • Zhen, Shuai
  • Hu, Chen-Ming
  • Bian, Li-Hong
subjects:
  • Research Article
  • Biology
  • Medicine
ispartof: PLoS ONE, 2013, Vol.8(12)
description: Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the major cause of cervical cancer (CC), but a number of infected women do not develop invasive lesions, suggesting the role of genetic susceptibility and environmental co-factors for cancer outbreak. Glutathione S- transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that play a key role in the detoxification of varieties of both endogenous products of oxidative stress and exogenous carcinogens. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched. All studies evaluating the association between GSTM1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed-or random-effects model. Results A total of 23 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall result showed that the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk for cervical cancer was statistically significant (OR = 1.56; 95%CI, 1.39–1.75). Subgroup analyses were performed based on ethnicity, smoking and HPV infection. Our results showed that smokers with null GSTM1 genotype had higher risk of cervical cancer (OR = 2.27, 95%CI, 1.46–3.54). For the ethnicity stratification, significant increased risk of null GSTM1 genotype was found in Chinese and Indian population, but no increased risk in other population was found. Conclusions this meta-analysis provided strong evidence that the GSTM1 genotype is associated with CC development, especially in Chinese and Indian populations. Smoking and HPV infection modified the association between the null GSTM1 genotype and CC.
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identifier: E-ISSN: 1932-6203 ; DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0083497 ; PMCID: 3877062 ; PMID: 24391774
fulltext: fulltext
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  • 1932-6203
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titleGlutathione S-Transferase Polymorphism Interactions with Smoking Status and HPV Infection in Cervical Cancer Risk: An Evidence-Based Meta-Analysis
creatorZhen, Shuai ; Hu, Chen-Ming ; Bian, Li-Hong
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descriptionBackground Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the major cause of cervical cancer (CC), but a number of infected women do not develop invasive lesions, suggesting the role of genetic susceptibility and environmental co-factors for cancer outbreak. Glutathione S- transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that play a key role in the detoxification of varieties of both endogenous products of oxidative stress and exogenous carcinogens. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched. All studies evaluating the association between GSTM1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed-or random-effects model. Results A total of 23 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall result showed that the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk for cervical cancer was statistically significant (OR = 1.56; 95%CI, 1.39–1.75). Subgroup analyses were performed based on ethnicity, smoking and HPV infection. Our results showed that smokers with null GSTM1 genotype had higher risk of cervical cancer (OR = 2.27, 95%CI, 1.46–3.54). For the ethnicity stratification, significant increased risk of null GSTM1 genotype was found in Chinese and Indian population, but no increased risk in other population was found. Conclusions this meta-analysis provided strong evidence that the GSTM1 genotype is associated with CC development, especially in Chinese and Indian populations. Smoking and HPV infection modified the association between the null GSTM1 genotype and CC.
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descriptionBackground Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the major cause of cervical cancer (CC), but a number of infected women do not develop invasive lesions, suggesting the role of genetic susceptibility and environmental co-factors for cancer outbreak. Glutathione S- transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that play a key role in the detoxification of varieties of both endogenous products of oxidative stress and exogenous carcinogens. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched. All studies evaluating the association between GSTM1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed-or random-effects model. Results A total of 23 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall result showed that the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk for cervical cancer was statistically significant (OR = 1.56; 95%CI, 1.39–1.75). Subgroup analyses were performed based on ethnicity, smoking and HPV infection. Our results showed that smokers with null GSTM1 genotype had higher risk of cervical cancer (OR = 2.27, 95%CI, 1.46–3.54). For the ethnicity stratification, significant increased risk of null GSTM1 genotype was found in Chinese and Indian population, but no increased risk in other population was found. Conclusions this meta-analysis provided strong evidence that the GSTM1 genotype is associated with CC development, especially in Chinese and Indian populations. Smoking and HPV infection modified the association between the null GSTM1 genotype and CC.
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abstractBackground Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is considered the major cause of cervical cancer (CC), but a number of infected women do not develop invasive lesions, suggesting the role of genetic susceptibility and environmental co-factors for cancer outbreak. Glutathione S- transferases (GSTs) are multifunctional enzymes that play a key role in the detoxification of varieties of both endogenous products of oxidative stress and exogenous carcinogens. Methods MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane databases were searched. All studies evaluating the association between GSTM1 polymorphisms and cervical cancer were included. Pooled odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated using fixed-or random-effects model. Results A total of 23 case-control studies were included in the meta-analysis. The overall result showed that the association between GSTM1 null genotype and risk for cervical cancer was statistically significant (OR = 1.56; 95%CI, 1.39–1.75). Subgroup analyses were performed based on ethnicity, smoking and HPV infection. Our results showed that smokers with null GSTM1 genotype had higher risk of cervical cancer (OR = 2.27, 95%CI, 1.46–3.54). For the ethnicity stratification, significant increased risk of null GSTM1 genotype was found in Chinese and Indian population, but no increased risk in other population was found. Conclusions this meta-analysis provided strong evidence that the GSTM1 genotype is associated with CC development, especially in Chinese and Indian populations. Smoking and HPV infection modified the association between the null GSTM1 genotype and CC.
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