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Alcohol Intake Among Breast Cancer Survivors: Change in Alcohol Use During a Weight Management Intervention

Background Daily alcohol intake in quantities as small as half a drink/day significantly increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence for postmenopausal survivors. Interventions designed to modify alcohol use among survivors have not been studied; however, lifestyle interventions that target chang... Full description

Journal Title: JMIR cancer 2016, Vol.2(2)
Main Author: Jones, Jennifer
Other Authors: Ribeiro, Nuno , Almeida, Ana Margarida , Fazzino, Tera L , Fleming, Kimberly , Befort, Christie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: E-ISSN: 2369-1999 ; DOI: 10.2196/cancer.6295 ; PMCID: 5367843 ; PMID: 28410181
Link: http://cancer.jmir.org/2016/2/e15/
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recordid: pubmed_central5367843
title: Alcohol Intake Among Breast Cancer Survivors: Change in Alcohol Use During a Weight Management Intervention
format: Article
creator:
  • Jones, Jennifer
  • Ribeiro, Nuno
  • Almeida, Ana Margarida
  • Fazzino, Tera L
  • Fleming, Kimberly
  • Befort, Christie
subjects:
  • Original Paper
  • Original Paper
  • Alcohol Drinking
  • Breast Cancer
  • Weight Loss
  • Weight Reduction Programs
  • Obesity
ispartof: JMIR cancer, 2016, Vol.2(2)
description: Background Daily alcohol intake in quantities as small as half a drink/day significantly increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence for postmenopausal survivors. Interventions designed to modify alcohol use among survivors have not been studied; however, lifestyle interventions that target change in dietary intake may affect alcohol intake. Objective To evaluate change in alcohol use during a weight loss intervention for obese, rural-dwelling breast cancer survivors. Methods Data were derived from an 18-month trial that included a 6-month weight loss intervention delivered via group conference calls, followed by a 12-month randomized weight loss maintenance phase in which participants received continued group calls or mailed newsletters. Participants who reported regular alcohol use at baseline (N=37) were included in this study. Results Mean daily alcohol intake significantly decreased from baseline to 6 months during the weight loss intervention (19.6-2.3 g; P =.001). Mean alcohol intake did not significantly increase ( b =0.99, P =.12) during the weight loss maintenance phase (months 6-18) and did not depend on randomization group ( b =0.32, P =.799). Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence that a weight loss intervention may address obesity and alcohol use risk factors for cancer recurrence. Minimal mail-based contact post weight loss can maintain alcohol use reductions through 18 months, suggesting durability in these effects. These results highlight a possibility that lifestyle interventions for survivors may modify health behaviors that are not the main foci of an intervention but that coincide with intervention goals. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01441011; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01441011 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6lsJ9dMa9)
language:
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 2369-1999 ; DOI: 10.2196/cancer.6295 ; PMCID: 5367843 ; PMID: 28410181
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2369-1999
  • 23691999
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titleAlcohol Intake Among Breast Cancer Survivors: Change in Alcohol Use During a Weight Management Intervention
creatorJones, Jennifer ; Ribeiro, Nuno ; Almeida, Ana Margarida ; Fazzino, Tera L ; Fleming, Kimberly ; Befort, Christie
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subjectOriginal Paper ; Original Paper ; Alcohol Drinking ; Breast Cancer ; Weight Loss ; Weight Reduction Programs ; Obesity
descriptionBackground Daily alcohol intake in quantities as small as half a drink/day significantly increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence for postmenopausal survivors. Interventions designed to modify alcohol use among survivors have not been studied; however, lifestyle interventions that target change in dietary intake may affect alcohol intake. Objective To evaluate change in alcohol use during a weight loss intervention for obese, rural-dwelling breast cancer survivors. Methods Data were derived from an 18-month trial that included a 6-month weight loss intervention delivered via group conference calls, followed by a 12-month randomized weight loss maintenance phase in which participants received continued group calls or mailed newsletters. Participants who reported regular alcohol use at baseline (N=37) were included in this study. Results Mean daily alcohol intake significantly decreased from baseline to 6 months during the weight loss intervention (19.6-2.3 g; P =.001). Mean alcohol intake did not significantly increase ( b =0.99, P =.12) during the weight loss maintenance phase (months 6-18) and did not depend on randomization group ( b =0.32, P =.799). Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence that a weight loss intervention may address obesity and alcohol use risk factors for cancer recurrence. Minimal mail-based contact post weight loss can maintain alcohol use reductions through 18 months, suggesting durability in these effects. These results highlight a possibility that lifestyle interventions for survivors may modify health behaviors that are not the main foci of an intervention but that coincide with intervention goals. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01441011; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01441011 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6lsJ9dMa9)
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titleAlcohol Intake Among Breast Cancer Survivors: Change in Alcohol Use During a Weight Management Intervention
descriptionBackground Daily alcohol intake in quantities as small as half a drink/day significantly increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence for postmenopausal survivors. Interventions designed to modify alcohol use among survivors have not been studied; however, lifestyle interventions that target change in dietary intake may affect alcohol intake. Objective To evaluate change in alcohol use during a weight loss intervention for obese, rural-dwelling breast cancer survivors. Methods Data were derived from an 18-month trial that included a 6-month weight loss intervention delivered via group conference calls, followed by a 12-month randomized weight loss maintenance phase in which participants received continued group calls or mailed newsletters. Participants who reported regular alcohol use at baseline (N=37) were included in this study. Results Mean daily alcohol intake significantly decreased from baseline to 6 months during the weight loss intervention (19.6-2.3 g; P =.001). Mean alcohol intake did not significantly increase ( b =0.99, P =.12) during the weight loss maintenance phase (months 6-18) and did not depend on randomization group ( b =0.32, P =.799). Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence that a weight loss intervention may address obesity and alcohol use risk factors for cancer recurrence. Minimal mail-based contact post weight loss can maintain alcohol use reductions through 18 months, suggesting durability in these effects. These results highlight a possibility that lifestyle interventions for survivors may modify health behaviors that are not the main foci of an intervention but that coincide with intervention goals. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01441011; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01441011 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6lsJ9dMa9)
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abstractBackground Daily alcohol intake in quantities as small as half a drink/day significantly increases the risk of breast cancer recurrence for postmenopausal survivors. Interventions designed to modify alcohol use among survivors have not been studied; however, lifestyle interventions that target change in dietary intake may affect alcohol intake. Objective To evaluate change in alcohol use during a weight loss intervention for obese, rural-dwelling breast cancer survivors. Methods Data were derived from an 18-month trial that included a 6-month weight loss intervention delivered via group conference calls, followed by a 12-month randomized weight loss maintenance phase in which participants received continued group calls or mailed newsletters. Participants who reported regular alcohol use at baseline (N=37) were included in this study. Results Mean daily alcohol intake significantly decreased from baseline to 6 months during the weight loss intervention (19.6-2.3 g; P =.001). Mean alcohol intake did not significantly increase ( b =0.99, P =.12) during the weight loss maintenance phase (months 6-18) and did not depend on randomization group ( b =0.32, P =.799). Conclusions Findings provide preliminary evidence that a weight loss intervention may address obesity and alcohol use risk factors for cancer recurrence. Minimal mail-based contact post weight loss can maintain alcohol use reductions through 18 months, suggesting durability in these effects. These results highlight a possibility that lifestyle interventions for survivors may modify health behaviors that are not the main foci of an intervention but that coincide with intervention goals. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT01441011; https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01441011 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6lsJ9dMa9)
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