schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Addressing the Challenge: Current and Future Directions in Ovarian Cancer Therapy

Numerous ovarian gene therapy strategies are in clinical phases based on concepts of replacement/ knock out of deregulated gene, suicide gene strategies, strengthening of the immune response against a tumor, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth factors. Non-viral delivery systems have potenti... Full description

Journal Title: Current Gene Therapy December 2009, Vol.9(6), pp.434-458
Main Author: Wettig, Shawn D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Ibd
ID: ISSN: 1566-5232
Link: http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: pubtecben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001
title: Addressing the Challenge: Current and Future Directions in Ovarian Cancer Therapy
format: Article
creator:
  • Wettig, Shawn D.
subjects:
  • Ibd
ispartof: Current Gene Therapy, December 2009, Vol.9(6), pp.434-458
description: Numerous ovarian gene therapy strategies are in clinical phases based on concepts of replacement/ knock out of deregulated gene, suicide gene strategies, strengthening of the immune response against a tumor, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth factors. Non-viral delivery systems have potential advantages over currently widely used viral vectors and other classical vectors for delivering therapeutic gene of interest. The present review provides a comprehensive overview of potential of various delivery systems currently in use. Non-viral formulations used in ovarian gene therapy include injecting naked DNA, liposomes, polyplexes, lipopolyplexes, nanoparticles, gene gun and ultrasound/microbubble mediated gene delivery. In addition to improving vector delivery, the DNA constructs need to be optimised for both efficient and long-term transgene expression. Minicircles using minimal immunological defined gene expression (MIDGE) technology, are a promising future alternative to plasmid for use in non-viral ovarian gene therapy in terms of biosafety, improved gene transfer, potential bioavailability, minimal size and little immune reaction. The review explores the best route of administration for ovarian cancer gene therapy given its peritoneal dissemination which poses a major challenge in treating ovarian cancer patients. Enhancement of therapeutic index can be further achieved by overcoming barriers both at cellular and nuclear levels. Selective tumor targeting with minimal toxicity using folate modified, incorporating nuclear localization signal and PEGylated stealth liposome's represents a popular approach and needs to be exploited in ovarian gene therapy.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1566-5232
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 15665232
  • 1566-5232
url: Link


@attributes
ID1749032041
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001
sourceidpubtec
recordidTN_pubtecben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001
originalsourceidpubtec
sourcesystemPC
pqid746199664
ingidben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001
display
typearticle
titleAddressing the Challenge: Current and Future Directions in Ovarian Cancer Therapy
creatorWettig, Shawn D.
ispartofCurrent Gene Therapy, December 2009, Vol.9(6), pp.434-458
identifierISSN: 1566-5232
subjectIbd
descriptionNumerous ovarian gene therapy strategies are in clinical phases based on concepts of replacement/ knock out of deregulated gene, suicide gene strategies, strengthening of the immune response against a tumor, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth factors. Non-viral delivery systems have potential advantages over currently widely used viral vectors and other classical vectors for delivering therapeutic gene of interest. The present review provides a comprehensive overview of potential of various delivery systems currently in use. Non-viral formulations used in ovarian gene therapy include injecting naked DNA, liposomes, polyplexes, lipopolyplexes, nanoparticles, gene gun and ultrasound/microbubble mediated gene delivery. In addition to improving vector delivery, the DNA constructs need to be optimised for both efficient and long-term transgene expression. Minicircles using minimal immunological defined gene expression (MIDGE) technology, are a promising future alternative to plasmid for use in non-viral ovarian gene therapy in terms of biosafety, improved gene transfer, potential bioavailability, minimal size and little immune reaction. The review explores the best route of administration for ovarian cancer gene therapy given its peritoneal dissemination which poses a major challenge in treating ovarian cancer patients. Enhancement of therapeutic index can be further achieved by overcoming barriers both at cellular and nuclear levels. Selective tumor targeting with minimal toxicity using folate modified, incorporating nuclear localization signal and PEGylated stealth liposome's represents a popular approach and needs to be exploited in ovarian gene therapy.
languageeng
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/ben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001$$EView source record
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontribWettig, Shawn D.
titleAddressing the Challenge: Current and Future Directions in Ovarian Cancer Therapy
descriptionNumerous ovarian gene therapy strategies are in clinical phases based on concepts of replacement/ knock out of deregulated gene, suicide gene strategies, strengthening of the immune response against a tumor, inhibition of tumor angiogenesis and growth factors. Non-viral delivery systems have potential advantages over currently widely used viral vectors and other classical vectors for delivering therapeutic gene of interest. The present review provides a comprehensive overview of potential of various delivery systems currently in use. Non-viral formulations used in ovarian gene therapy include injecting naked DNA, liposomes, polyplexes, lipopolyplexes, nanoparticles, gene gun and ultrasound/microbubble mediated gene delivery. In addition to improving vector delivery, the DNA constructs need to be optimised for both efficient and long-term transgene expression. Minicircles using minimal immunological defined gene expression (MIDGE) technology, are a promising future alternative to plasmid for use in non-viral ovarian gene therapy in terms of biosafety, improved gene transfer, potential bioavailability, minimal size and little immune reaction. The review explores the best route of administration for ovarian cancer gene therapy given its peritoneal dissemination which poses a major challenge in treating ovarian cancer patients. Enhancement of therapeutic index can be further achieved by overcoming barriers both at cellular and nuclear levels. Selective tumor targeting with minimal toxicity using folate modified, incorporating nuclear localization signal and PEGylated stealth liposome's represents a popular approach and needs to be exploited in ovarian gene therapy.
general
0Bentham Science (IngentaConnect)
1English
sourceidpubtec
recordidpubtecben/cgt/2009/00000009/00000006/art00001
issn
015665232
11566-5232
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2009
recordtypearticle
addtitleCurrent Gene Therapy
searchscope
0pubtec
1pubtech_ben
scope
0pubtec
1pubtech_ben
subjectIbd
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[doi, pages, ingid, pqid, eissn]
sort
titleAddressing the Challenge: Current and Future Directions in Ovarian Cancer Therapy
authorWettig, Shawn D.
creationdate20091200
facets
frbrgroupid8802158046559544016
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2009
topicIbd
collectionBentham Science (IngentaConnect)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontribWettig, Shawn D.
jtitleCurrent Gene Therapy
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
auWettig, Shawn D.
atitleAddressing the Challenge: Current and Future Directions in Ovarian Cancer Therapy
jtitleCurrent Gene Therapy
risdate200912
volume9
issue6
spage434
epage458
issn1566-5232
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
pubBentham Science Publishers
doi10.2174/156652309790031148
pages434-458
eissn18755631
date2009-12