schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

1,3,5-Trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a new quencher for preserving redox-labile disinfection byproducts and for quantifying free chlorine and free bromine

Sodium sulfite, sodium thiosulfate, and ascorbic acid are commonly used to quench free chlorine and free bromine in studies of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water, wastewater, and recreational water. The reducing capabilities of these quenchers, however, can lead to the degradation of s... Full description

Journal Title: Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology 2018, Vol.4(7), pp.926-941
Main Author: Lau, Stephanie S.
Other Authors: Dias, Ryan P. , Martin-Culet, Kayla R. , Race, Nicholas A. , Schammel, Marella H. , Reber, Keith P. , Roberts, A. Lynn , Sivey, John D.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: DOI: 10.1039/c8ew00062j
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: rscc8ew00062j
title: 1,3,5-Trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a new quencher for preserving redox-labile disinfection byproducts and for quantifying free chlorine and free bromine
format: Article
creator:
  • Lau, Stephanie S.
  • Dias, Ryan P.
  • Martin-Culet, Kayla R.
  • Race, Nicholas A.
  • Schammel, Marella H.
  • Reber, Keith P.
  • Roberts, A. Lynn
  • Sivey, John D.
subjects:
  • 2,4-Dichlorophenol
  • Sodium Sulfites
  • Recreational Waters
  • Chlorination
  • Byproducts
  • Water Treatment
  • Ammonium
  • Bromine
  • Bromine
  • Halogens
  • Drinking Water
  • Sodium
  • Thiosulfates
  • Wastewater
  • Wastewater
  • Byproducts
  • Halogens
  • Anisole
  • Vitamin C
  • Halogenation
  • Sodium Thiosulfate
  • Chlorination
  • Anisole
  • Ammonium Chlorides
  • Disinfection
  • Thiosulfate
  • Ammonium Chloride
  • Drinking Water
  • Bromine
  • Monochloramine
  • Sodium Thiosulfate
  • Ammonium
  • Ascorbic Acid
  • Kinetics
  • Kinetics
  • Constants
  • Byproducts
  • Rate Constants
  • Sodium
  • Disinfection
  • Ammonium Chloride
  • Halogens
  • Chlorine
  • Chlorination
  • Halogenation
  • Ascorbic Acid
  • Waste Water
  • Chlorine
  • Ammonium Compounds
  • Bromination
  • Halogens
  • Feasibility Studies
  • Sodium
  • Halogenation
  • Feasibility
  • Redox Reactions
  • Drinking Water
  • Drinking Water
  • Chlorine
  • Sodium Sulfite
  • Sulfite
  • Disinfection
  • Chlorine
  • Chlorination
  • Chlorine
  • Reaction Kinetics
  • Bromination
ispartof: Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology, 2018, Vol.4(7), pp.926-941
description: Sodium sulfite, sodium thiosulfate, and ascorbic acid are commonly used to quench free chlorine and free bromine in studies of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water, wastewater, and recreational water. The reducing capabilities of these quenchers, however, can lead to the degradation of some redox-labile analytes. Ammonium chloride, another common quencher, converts free chlorine into monochloramine and is therefore inappropriate for analytes susceptible to chloramination. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a quencher of free chlorine and free bromine. The reactivity of TMB toward free chlorine was characterized previously. The reactivity of TMB toward free bromine was quantified herein ( k HOBr,TMB = 3.35 10 6 M 1 s 1 ) using competition kinetics. To explore the feasibility of TMB serving as a free halogen quencher for kinetic experiments, chlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol, bromination of anisole, and chlorination and bromination of dimethenamid-P were examined. Although TMB does not react with free chlorine or free bromine as quickly as do some (but not all) traditional quenchers, there was generally no significant difference in the experimental rate constants with TMB (relative to thiosulfate) as the quencher. By monitoring the chlorination and bromination products of TMB, free halogen residuals in quenched samples were quantified. Furthermore, TMB did not affect the stabilities of DBPs ( e.g. , chloropicrin and bromoacetonitriles) that otherwise degraded in the presence of traditional quenchers. TMB could, therefore, be an appropriate quencher of free chlorine and free bromine in aqueous halogenation experiments involving redox-labile analytes and/or when selective quantification of residual free halogens is desired.
language:
source:
identifier: DOI: 10.1039/c8ew00062j
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2053-1400
  • 2053-1419
  • 20531419
  • 20531400
url: Link


@attributes
ID83850920
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidc8ew00062j
sourceidrsc
recordidTN_rscc8ew00062j
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemPC
pqid2061096841
display
typearticle
title1,3,5-Trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a new quencher for preserving redox-labile disinfection byproducts and for quantifying free chlorine and free bromine
creatorLau, Stephanie S. ; Dias, Ryan P. ; Martin-Culet, Kayla R. ; Race, Nicholas A. ; Schammel, Marella H. ; Reber, Keith P. ; Roberts, A. Lynn ; Sivey, John D.
ispartofEnvironmental Science: Water Research & Technology, 2018, Vol.4(7), pp.926-941
identifierDOI: 10.1039/c8ew00062j
descriptionSodium sulfite, sodium thiosulfate, and ascorbic acid are commonly used to quench free chlorine and free bromine in studies of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water, wastewater, and recreational water. The reducing capabilities of these quenchers, however, can lead to the degradation of some redox-labile analytes. Ammonium chloride, another common quencher, converts free chlorine into monochloramine and is therefore inappropriate for analytes susceptible to chloramination. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a quencher of free chlorine and free bromine. The reactivity of TMB toward free chlorine was characterized previously. The reactivity of TMB toward free bromine was quantified herein ( k HOBr,TMB = 3.35 10 6 M 1 s 1 ) using competition kinetics. To explore the feasibility of TMB serving as a free halogen quencher for kinetic experiments, chlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol, bromination of anisole, and chlorination and bromination of dimethenamid-P were examined. Although TMB does not react with free chlorine or free bromine as quickly as do some (but not all) traditional quenchers, there was generally no significant difference in the experimental rate constants with TMB (relative to thiosulfate) as the quencher. By monitoring the chlorination and bromination products of TMB, free halogen residuals in quenched samples were quantified. Furthermore, TMB did not affect the stabilities of DBPs ( e.g. , chloropicrin and bromoacetonitriles) that otherwise degraded in the presence of traditional quenchers. TMB could, therefore, be an appropriate quencher of free chlorine and free bromine in aqueous halogenation experiments involving redox-labile analytes and/or when selective quantification of residual free halogens is desired.
source
subject2,4-Dichlorophenol ; Sodium Sulfites ; Recreational Waters ; Chlorination ; Byproducts ; Water Treatment ; Ammonium ; Bromine ; Bromine ; Halogens ; Drinking Water ; Sodium ; Thiosulfates ; Wastewater ; Wastewater ; Byproducts ; Halogens ; Anisole ; Vitamin C ; Halogenation ; Sodium Thiosulfate ; Chlorination ; Anisole ; Ammonium Chlorides ; Disinfection ; Thiosulfate ; Ammonium Chloride ; Drinking Water ; Bromine ; Monochloramine ; Sodium Thiosulfate ; Ammonium ; Ascorbic Acid ; Kinetics ; Kinetics ; Constants ; Byproducts ; Rate Constants ; Sodium ; Disinfection ; Ammonium Chloride ; Halogens ; Chlorine ; Chlorination ; Halogenation ; Ascorbic Acid ; Waste Water ; Chlorine ; Ammonium Compounds ; Bromination ; Halogens ; Feasibility Studies ; Sodium ; Halogenation ; Feasibility ; Redox Reactions ; Drinking Water ; Drinking Water ; Chlorine ; Sodium Sulfite ; Sulfite ; Disinfection ; Chlorine ; Chlorination ; Chlorine ; Reaction Kinetics ; Bromination;
version3
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Lau, Stephanie S.
1Dias, Ryan P.
2Martin-Culet, Kayla R.
3Race, Nicholas A.
4Schammel, Marella H.
5Reber, Keith P.
6Roberts, A. Lynn
7Sivey, John D.
title1,3,5-Trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a new quencher for preserving redox-labile disinfection byproducts and for quantifying free chlorine and free bromine
descriptionSodium sulfite, sodium thiosulfate, and ascorbic acid are commonly used to quench free chlorine and free bromine in studies of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water, wastewater, and recreational water. The reducing capabilities of these quenchers, however, can lead to the degradation of some redox-labile analytes. Ammonium chloride, another common quencher, converts free chlorine into monochloramine and is therefore inappropriate for analytes susceptible to chloramination. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a quencher of free chlorine and free bromine. The reactivity of TMB toward free chlorine was characterized previously. The reactivity of TMB toward free bromine was quantified herein ( k HOBr,TMB = 3.35 10 6 M 1 s 1 ) using competition kinetics. To explore the feasibility of TMB serving as a free halogen quencher for kinetic experiments, chlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol, bromination of anisole, and chlorination and bromination of dimethenamid-P were examined. Although TMB does not react with free chlorine or free bromine as quickly as do some (but not all) traditional quenchers, there was generally no significant difference in the experimental rate constants with TMB (relative to thiosulfate) as the quencher. By monitoring the chlorination and bromination products of TMB, free halogen residuals in quenched samples were quantified. Furthermore, TMB did not affect the stabilities of DBPs ( e.g. , chloropicrin and bromoacetonitriles) that otherwise degraded in the presence of traditional quenchers. TMB could, therefore, be an appropriate quencher of free chlorine and free bromine in aqueous halogenation experiments involving redox-labile analytes and/or when selective quantification of residual free halogens is desired.
general
010.1039/c8ew00062j
1Royal Society of Chemistry
sourceidrsc
recordidrscc8ew00062j
issn
02053-1400
12053-1419
220531419
320531400
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2018
addtitle
0Environmental Science: Water Research & Technology
1Environ. Sci.: Water Res. Technol.
searchscope
0RSC
1rsc
scope
0RSC
1rsc
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, subject, pqid]
sort
title1,3,5-Trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a new quencher for preserving redox-labile disinfection byproducts and for quantifying free chlorine and free bromine
authorLau, Stephanie S. ; Dias, Ryan P. ; Martin-Culet, Kayla R. ; Race, Nicholas A. ; Schammel, Marella H. ; Reber, Keith P. ; Roberts, A. Lynn ; Sivey, John D.
creationdate20180628
facets
frbrgroupid7001660406513411548
frbrtype5
newrecords20180704
creationdate2018
collectionRSC Journals (Royal Society of Chemistry)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Lau,Stephanie S.
1Dias,Ryan P.
2Martin-Culet,Kayla R.
3Race,Nicholas A.
4Schammel,Marella H.
5Reber,Keith P.
6Roberts,A. Lynn
7Sivey,John D.
jtitleEnvironmental Science: Water Research &Amp; Technology
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Lau
1Dias
2Martin-Culet
3Race
4Schammel
5Reber
6Roberts
7Sivey
aufirst
0Stephanie S.
1Ryan P.
2Kayla R.
3Nicholas A.
4Marella H.
5Keith P.
6A. Lynn
7John D.
au
0Lau, Stephanie S.
1Dias, Ryan P.
2Martin-Culet, Kayla R.
3Race, Nicholas A.
4Schammel, Marella H.
5Reber, Keith P.
6Roberts, A. Lynn
7Sivey, John D.
atitle1,3,5-Trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a new quencher for preserving redox-labile disinfection byproducts and for quantifying free chlorine and free bromine
jtitleEnvironmental Science: Water Research & Technology
addtitleEnviron. Sci.: Water Res. Technol.
risdate20180628
volume4
issue7
spage926
epage941
issn2053-1400
eissn2053-1419
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractSodium sulfite, sodium thiosulfate, and ascorbic acid are commonly used to quench free chlorine and free bromine in studies of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) in drinking water, wastewater, and recreational water. The reducing capabilities of these quenchers, however, can lead to the degradation of some redox-labile analytes. Ammonium chloride, another common quencher, converts free chlorine into monochloramine and is therefore inappropriate for analytes susceptible to chloramination. Herein, we demonstrate the utility of 1,3,5-trimethoxybenzene (TMB) as a quencher of free chlorine and free bromine. The reactivity of TMB toward free chlorine was characterized previously. The reactivity of TMB toward free bromine was quantified herein ( k HOBr,TMB = 3.35 10 6 M 1 s 1 ) using competition kinetics. To explore the feasibility of TMB serving as a free halogen quencher for kinetic experiments, chlorination of 2,4-dichlorophenol, bromination of anisole, and chlorination and bromination of dimethenamid-P were examined. Although TMB does not react with free chlorine or free bromine as quickly as do some (but not all) traditional quenchers, there was generally no significant difference in the experimental rate constants with TMB (relative to thiosulfate) as the quencher. By monitoring the chlorination and bromination products of TMB, free halogen residuals in quenched samples were quantified. Furthermore, TMB did not affect the stabilities of DBPs ( e.g. , chloropicrin and bromoacetonitriles) that otherwise degraded in the presence of traditional quenchers. TMB could, therefore, be an appropriate quencher of free chlorine and free bromine in aqueous halogenation experiments involving redox-labile analytes and/or when selective quantification of residual free halogens is desired.
doi10.1039/c8ew00062j
pages926-941
date2018-06-28