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The Absence of Ottoman, Islamic Europe in Edward W. Said’s Orientalism

Edward W. Said’s Orientalism has attained canonical status as the key study of the cultural politics of western representation of the East, specifically the imaginative geographies underwriting constructions such as the Middle East and the Islamic world. The Ottoman Empire overlapped both European a... Full description

Journal Title: Theory Culture & Society, January 2013, Vol.30(1), pp.99-121
Main Author: Bryce, Derek
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0263-2764 ; E-ISSN: 1460-3616 ; DOI: 10.1177/0263276412456562
Link: https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/full/10.1177/0263276412456562
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recordid: sage_s10_1177_0263276412456562
title: The Absence of Ottoman, Islamic Europe in Edward W. Said’s Orientalism
format: Article
creator:
  • Bryce, Derek
subjects:
  • Europeanism
  • Historical Narratives
  • History/Critique
  • Islam
  • Orientalism
  • Ottoman Empire
  • Said
  • Social Sciences (General)
ispartof: Theory, Culture & Society, January 2013, Vol.30(1), pp.99-121
description: Edward W. Said’s Orientalism has attained canonical status as the key study of the cultural politics of western representation of the East, specifically the imaginative geographies underwriting constructions such as the Middle East and the Islamic world. The Ottoman Empire overlapped both European and exteriorized Oriental space during much of the period that Said dealt with, yet while the existence of the empire is referred to in Said’s study, the theoretical implications of that presence for his critique of Orientalist discourse are not. The material presence of the Ottoman state, in the Arabic-speaking lands, but also crucially, and for a longer period, much of south-east Europe and Anatolia, highlights long-standing Oriental geopolitical and cultural agency in the face of unidirectional narratives of western encroachment. Attention to the specific discursive manoeuvres undertaken by the West to handle that disruptive, intrinsic Ottoman presence in Europe itself may add traction...
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0263-2764 ; E-ISSN: 1460-3616 ; DOI: 10.1177/0263276412456562
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0263-2764
  • 02632764
  • 1460-3616
  • 14603616
url: Link


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descriptionEdward W. Said’s Orientalism has attained canonical status as the key study of the cultural politics of western representation of the East, specifically the imaginative geographies underwriting constructions such as the Middle East and the Islamic world. The Ottoman Empire overlapped both European and exteriorized Oriental space during much of the period that Said dealt with, yet while the existence of the empire is referred to in Said’s study, the theoretical implications of that presence for his critique of Orientalist discourse are not. The material presence of the Ottoman state, in the Arabic-speaking lands, but also crucially, and for a longer period, much of south-east Europe and Anatolia, highlights long-standing Oriental geopolitical and cultural agency in the face of unidirectional narratives of western encroachment. Attention to the specific discursive manoeuvres undertaken by the West to handle that disruptive, intrinsic Ottoman presence in Europe itself may add traction...
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lsr40Theory, Culture & Society, January 2013, Vol.30 (1), pp.99-121
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Edward W. Said’s Orientalism has attained canonical status as the key study of the cultural politics of western representation of the East, specifically the imaginative geographies underwriting constructions such as the Middle East and the Islamic world. The Ottoman Empire overlapped both European and exteriorized Oriental space during much of the period that Said dealt with, yet while the existence of the empire is referred to in Said’s study, the theoretical implications of that presence for his critique of Orientalist discourse are not. The material presence of the Ottoman state, in the Arabic-speaking lands, but also crucially, and for a longer period, much of south-east Europe and Anatolia, highlights long-standing Oriental geopolitical and cultural agency in the face of unidirectional narratives of western encroachment. Attention to the specific discursive manoeuvres undertaken by the West to handle that disruptive, intrinsic Ottoman presence in Europe itself may add traction...

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