schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Ambient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: Exposure levels, source implications and health risks

Benzene is a known human carcinogen causing leukemia, yet ambient air quality objectives for benzene are not available in China. The ambient benzene levels at four background sites in China's most developed coastal regions were measured from March 2012 to February 2013. The sites are: SYNECP, in the... Full description

Journal Title: Science of the Total Environment 1 April 2015, Vol.511, pp.792-800
Main Author: Zhang, Zhou
Other Authors: Wang, Xinming , Zhang, Yanli , Lü, Sujun , Huang, Zhonghui , Huang, Xinyu , Wang, Yuesi
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0048-9697 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS0048-9697(15)00006-6
title: Ambient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: Exposure levels, source implications and health risks
format: Article
creator:
  • Zhang, Zhou
  • Wang, Xinming
  • Zhang, Yanli
  • Lü, Sujun
  • Huang, Zhonghui
  • Huang, Xinyu
  • Wang, Yuesi
subjects:
  • Benzene
  • Exposure
  • Sources
  • Health Risk
  • Background
  • China
ispartof: Science of the Total Environment, 1 April 2015, Vol.511, pp.792-800
description: Benzene is a known human carcinogen causing leukemia, yet ambient air quality objectives for benzene are not available in China. The ambient benzene levels at four background sites in China's most developed coastal regions were measured from March 2012 to February 2013. The sites are: SYNECP, in the Northeast China Plain (NECP); YCNCP, in the North China Plain (NCP); THYRD, in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and DHPRD, in the Pearl River Delta (PRD). It was found that the mean annual benzene levels (578–1297ppt) at the background sites were alarmingly higher, especially when compared to those of 60–480pptv monitored in 28 cities in the United States. Wintertime benzene levels were significantly elevated at both sites (SYNECP and YCNCP) in northern China due to heating with coal/biofuels. Even at these background sites, the lifetime cancer risks of benzene (1.7–3.7E−05) all exceeded 1E−06 set by USEPA as acceptable for adults. At both sites in northern China, good correlations between benzene and CO or chloromethane, together with much lower toluene/benzene (T/B) ratios, suggested that benzene was largely related to coal combustion and biomass/biofuel burning. At the DHPRD site in the PRD, benzene revealed a highly significant correlation with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), indicating that its source was predominantly from vehicle emissions. At the THYRD site in the YRD, higher T/B ratios and correlations between benzene and tetrachloroethylene, or MTBE, implied that benzene levels were probably affected by both traffic-related and industrial emissions. •Background benzene had higher cancer risk in China's developed regions.•Coal/biofuel burning for heating increased benzene levels in winter in north China.•Industrial emission contributed substantially to benzene in the Yangtze River Delta.•Vehicle exhaust was the main source of benzene in the Pearl River Delta.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0048-9697 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003
fulltext: no_fulltext
issn:
  • 00489697
  • 0048-9697
url: Link


@attributes
ID1305922056
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordidS0048-9697(15)00006-6
sourceidsciversesciencedirect_elsevier
recordidTN_sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS0048-9697(15)00006-6
sourcesystemOther
pqid1677999398
galeid405334639
display
typearticle
titleAmbient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: Exposure levels, source implications and health risks
creatorZhang, Zhou ; Wang, Xinming ; Zhang, Yanli ; Lü, Sujun ; Huang, Zhonghui ; Huang, Xinyu ; Wang, Yuesi
ispartofScience of the Total Environment, 1 April 2015, Vol.511, pp.792-800
identifierISSN: 0048-9697 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003
subjectBenzene ; Exposure ; Sources ; Health Risk ; Background ; China
descriptionBenzene is a known human carcinogen causing leukemia, yet ambient air quality objectives for benzene are not available in China. The ambient benzene levels at four background sites in China's most developed coastal regions were measured from March 2012 to February 2013. The sites are: SYNECP, in the Northeast China Plain (NECP); YCNCP, in the North China Plain (NCP); THYRD, in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and DHPRD, in the Pearl River Delta (PRD). It was found that the mean annual benzene levels (578–1297ppt) at the background sites were alarmingly higher, especially when compared to those of 60–480pptv monitored in 28 cities in the United States. Wintertime benzene levels were significantly elevated at both sites (SYNECP and YCNCP) in northern China due to heating with coal/biofuels. Even at these background sites, the lifetime cancer risks of benzene (1.7–3.7E−05) all exceeded 1E−06 set by USEPA as acceptable for adults. At both sites in northern China, good correlations between benzene and CO or chloromethane, together with much lower toluene/benzene (T/B) ratios, suggested that benzene was largely related to coal combustion and biomass/biofuel burning. At the DHPRD site in the PRD, benzene revealed a highly significant correlation with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), indicating that its source was predominantly from vehicle emissions. At the THYRD site in the YRD, higher T/B ratios and correlations between benzene and tetrachloroethylene, or MTBE, implied that benzene levels were probably affected by both traffic-related and industrial emissions. •Background benzene had higher cancer risk in China's developed regions.•Coal/biofuel burning for heating increased benzene levels in winter in north China.•Industrial emission contributed substantially to benzene in the Yangtze River Delta.•Vehicle exhaust was the main source of benzene in the Pearl River Delta.
languageeng
source
version7
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003$$EView_record_in_ScienceDirect
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Zhang, Zhou
1Wang, Xinming
2Zhang, Yanli
3Lü, Sujun
4Huang, Zhonghui
5Huang, Xinyu
6Wang, Yuesi
titleAmbient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: Exposure levels, source implications and health risks
descriptionBenzene is a known human carcinogen causing leukemia, yet ambient air quality objectives for benzene are not available in China. The ambient benzene levels at four background sites in China's most developed coastal regions were measured from March 2012 to February 2013. The sites are: SYNECP, in the Northeast China Plain (NECP); YCNCP, in the North China Plain (NCP); THYRD, in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and DHPRD, in the Pearl River Delta (PRD). It was found that the mean annual benzene levels (578–1297ppt) at the background sites were alarmingly higher, especially when compared to those of 60–480pptv monitored in 28 cities in the United States. Wintertime benzene levels were significantly elevated at both sites (SYNECP and YCNCP) in northern China due to heating with coal/biofuels. Even at these background sites, the lifetime cancer risks of benzene (1.7–3.7E−05) all exceeded 1E−06 set by USEPA as acceptable for adults. At both sites in northern China, good correlations between benzene and CO or chloromethane, together with much lower toluene/benzene (T/B) ratios, suggested that benzene was largely related to coal combustion and biomass/biofuel burning. At the DHPRD site in the PRD, benzene revealed a highly significant correlation with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), indicating that its source was predominantly from vehicle emissions. At the THYRD site in the YRD, higher T/B ratios and correlations between benzene and tetrachloroethylene, or MTBE, implied that benzene levels were probably affected by both traffic-related and industrial emissions. •Background benzene had higher cancer risk in China's developed regions.•Coal/biofuel burning for heating increased benzene levels in winter in north China.•Industrial emission contributed substantially to benzene in the Yangtze River Delta.•Vehicle exhaust was the main source of benzene in the Pearl River Delta.
subject
0Benzene
1Exposure
2Sources
3Health Risk
4Background
5China
general
0English
1Elsevier B.V.
210.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003
3ScienceDirect (Elsevier B.V.)
4ScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
sourceidsciversesciencedirect_elsevier
recordidsciversesciencedirect_elsevierS0048-9697(15)00006-6
issn
000489697
10048-9697
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2015
addtitleScience of the Total Environment
searchscope
0sciversesciencedirect_elsevier
1elsevier_sciencedirect
scope
0sciversesciencedirect_elsevier
1elsevier_sciencedirect
startdate20150401
enddate20150401
citationpf 792 pt 800 vol 511
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[eissn, pqid, galeid]
sort
titleAmbient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: Exposure levels, source implications and health risks
authorZhang, Zhou ; Wang, Xinming ; Zhang, Yanli ; Lü, Sujun ; Huang, Zhonghui ; Huang, Xinyu ; Wang, Yuesi
creationdate20150401
lso0120150401
facets
frbrgroupid30691717351189816
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2015
topic
0Benzene
1Exposure
2Sources
3Health Risk
4Background
5China
collectionScienceDirect Journals (Elsevier)
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Zhang, Zhou
1Wang, Xinming
2Zhang, Yanli
3Lü, Sujun
4Huang, Zhonghui
5Huang, Xinyu
6Wang, Yuesi
jtitleScience of the Total Environment
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextno_fulltext
addata
aulast
0Zhang
1Wang
2
3Huang
aufirstZhou
au
0Zhang, Zhou
1Wang, Xinming
2Zhang, Yanli
3Lü, Sujun
4Huang, Zhonghui
5Huang, Xinyu
6Wang, Yuesi
atitleAmbient air benzene at background sites in China's most developed coastal regions: Exposure levels, source implications and health risks
jtitleScience of the Total Environment
risdate20150401
volume511
spage792
epage800
pages792-800
issn0048-9697
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractBenzene is a known human carcinogen causing leukemia, yet ambient air quality objectives for benzene are not available in China. The ambient benzene levels at four background sites in China's most developed coastal regions were measured from March 2012 to February 2013. The sites are: SYNECP, in the Northeast China Plain (NECP); YCNCP, in the North China Plain (NCP); THYRD, in the Yangtze River Delta (YRD) and DHPRD, in the Pearl River Delta (PRD). It was found that the mean annual benzene levels (578–1297ppt) at the background sites were alarmingly higher, especially when compared to those of 60–480pptv monitored in 28 cities in the United States. Wintertime benzene levels were significantly elevated at both sites (SYNECP and YCNCP) in northern China due to heating with coal/biofuels. Even at these background sites, the lifetime cancer risks of benzene (1.7–3.7E−05) all exceeded 1E−06 set by USEPA as acceptable for adults. At both sites in northern China, good correlations between benzene and CO or chloromethane, together with much lower toluene/benzene (T/B) ratios, suggested that benzene was largely related to coal combustion and biomass/biofuel burning. At the DHPRD site in the PRD, benzene revealed a highly significant correlation with methyl tert-butyl ether (MTBE), indicating that its source was predominantly from vehicle emissions. At the THYRD site in the YRD, higher T/B ratios and correlations between benzene and tetrachloroethylene, or MTBE, implied that benzene levels were probably affected by both traffic-related and industrial emissions. •Background benzene had higher cancer risk in China's developed regions.•Coal/biofuel burning for heating increased benzene levels in winter in north China.•Industrial emission contributed substantially to benzene in the Yangtze River Delta.•Vehicle exhaust was the main source of benzene in the Pearl River Delta.
pubElsevier B.V.
doi10.1016/j.scitotenv.2015.01.003
eissn18791026
date2015-04-01