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Doxorubicin encapsulated in stealth liposomes conferred with light-triggered drug release

Stealth liposomes can be used to extend the blood circulation time of encapsulated therapeutics. Inclusion of 2 molar % porphyrin-phospholipid (PoP) imparted optimal near infrared (NIR) light-triggered release of doxorubicin (Dox) from conventional sterically stabilized stealth liposomes. The type a... Full description

Journal Title: Biomaterials January 2016, Vol.75, pp.193-202
Main Author: Luo, Dandan
Other Authors: Carter, Kevin A. , Razi, Aida , Geng, Jumin , Shao, Shuai , Giraldo, Daniel , Sunar, Ulas , Ortega, Joaquin , Lovell, Jonathan F.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0142-9612 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.10.027
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.10.027
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recordid: sciversesciencedirect_elsevierS0142-9612(15)00831-5
title: Doxorubicin encapsulated in stealth liposomes conferred with light-triggered drug release
format: Article
creator:
  • Luo, Dandan
  • Carter, Kevin A.
  • Razi, Aida
  • Geng, Jumin
  • Shao, Shuai
  • Giraldo, Daniel
  • Sunar, Ulas
  • Ortega, Joaquin
  • Lovell, Jonathan F.
subjects:
  • Liposomes
  • Chemotherapy
  • Phototherapy
  • Doxorubicin
  • Porphyrin-Phospholipid
  • Chemophototherapy
ispartof: Biomaterials, January 2016, Vol.75, pp.193-202
description: Stealth liposomes can be used to extend the blood circulation time of encapsulated therapeutics. Inclusion of 2 molar % porphyrin-phospholipid (PoP) imparted optimal near infrared (NIR) light-triggered release of doxorubicin (Dox) from conventional sterically stabilized stealth liposomes. The type and amount of PoP affected drug loading, serum stability and drug release induced by NIR light. Cholesterol and PEGylation were required for Dox loading, but slowed light-triggered release. Dox in stealth PoP liposomes had a long circulation half-life in mice of 21.9 h and was stable in storage for months. Following intravenous injection and NIR irradiation, Dox deposition increased ∼7 fold in treated subcutaneous human pancreatic xenografts. Phototreatment induced mild tumor heating and complex tumor hemodynamics. A single chemophototherapy treatment with Dox-loaded stealth PoP liposomes (at 5–7 mg/kg Dox) eradicated tumors while corresponding chemo- or photodynamic therapies were ineffective. A low dose 3 mg/kg Dox phototreatment with stealth PoP liposomes was more effective than a maximum tolerated dose of free (7 mg/kg) or conventional long-circulating liposomal Dox (21 mg/kg). To our knowledge, Dox-loaded stealth PoP liposomes represent the first reported long-circulating nanoparticle capable of light-triggered drug release.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0142-9612 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.10.027
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 01429612
  • 0142-9612
url: Link


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titleDoxorubicin encapsulated in stealth liposomes conferred with light-triggered drug release
creatorLuo, Dandan ; Carter, Kevin A. ; Razi, Aida ; Geng, Jumin ; Shao, Shuai ; Giraldo, Daniel ; Sunar, Ulas ; Ortega, Joaquin ; Lovell, Jonathan F.
ispartofBiomaterials, January 2016, Vol.75, pp.193-202
identifierISSN: 0142-9612 ; DOI: 10.1016/j.biomaterials.2015.10.027
subjectLiposomes ; Chemotherapy ; Phototherapy ; Doxorubicin ; Porphyrin-Phospholipid ; Chemophototherapy
descriptionStealth liposomes can be used to extend the blood circulation time of encapsulated therapeutics. Inclusion of 2 molar % porphyrin-phospholipid (PoP) imparted optimal near infrared (NIR) light-triggered release of doxorubicin (Dox) from conventional sterically stabilized stealth liposomes. The type and amount of PoP affected drug loading, serum stability and drug release induced by NIR light. Cholesterol and PEGylation were required for Dox loading, but slowed light-triggered release. Dox in stealth PoP liposomes had a long circulation half-life in mice of 21.9 h and was stable in storage for months. Following intravenous injection and NIR irradiation, Dox deposition increased ∼7 fold in treated subcutaneous human pancreatic xenografts. Phototreatment induced mild tumor heating and complex tumor hemodynamics. A single chemophototherapy treatment with Dox-loaded stealth PoP liposomes (at 5–7 mg/kg Dox) eradicated tumors while corresponding chemo- or photodynamic therapies were ineffective. A low dose 3 mg/kg Dox phototreatment with stealth PoP liposomes was more effective than a maximum tolerated dose of free (7 mg/kg) or conventional long-circulating liposomal Dox (21 mg/kg). To our knowledge, Dox-loaded stealth PoP liposomes represent the first reported long-circulating nanoparticle capable of light-triggered drug release.
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abstractStealth liposomes can be used to extend the blood circulation time of encapsulated therapeutics. Inclusion of 2 molar % porphyrin-phospholipid (PoP) imparted optimal near infrared (NIR) light-triggered release of doxorubicin (Dox) from conventional sterically stabilized stealth liposomes. The type and amount of PoP affected drug loading, serum stability and drug release induced by NIR light. Cholesterol and PEGylation were required for Dox loading, but slowed light-triggered release. Dox in stealth PoP liposomes had a long circulation half-life in mice of 21.9 h and was stable in storage for months. Following intravenous injection and NIR irradiation, Dox deposition increased ∼7 fold in treated subcutaneous human pancreatic xenografts. Phototreatment induced mild tumor heating and complex tumor hemodynamics. A single chemophototherapy treatment with Dox-loaded stealth PoP liposomes (at 5–7 mg/kg Dox) eradicated tumors while corresponding chemo- or photodynamic therapies were ineffective. A low dose 3 mg/kg Dox phototreatment with stealth PoP liposomes was more effective than a maximum tolerated dose of free (7 mg/kg) or conventional long-circulating liposomal Dox (21 mg/kg). To our knowledge, Dox-loaded stealth PoP liposomes represent the first reported long-circulating nanoparticle capable of light-triggered drug release.
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