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Silica gel-encapsulated AtzA biocatalyst for atrazine biodegradation

Encapsulation of recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a biocatalyst has the potential to produce stable, long-lasting enzyme activity that can be used for numerous applications. The current study describes the use of this technology with recombinant E. coli cells expressing the atrazine-dec... Full description

Journal Title: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 2012, Vol.96(1), pp.231-240
Main Author: Reátegui, Eduardo
Other Authors: Reynolds, Erik , Kasinkas, Lisa , Aggarwal, Amit , Sadowsky, Michael , Aksan, Alptekin , Wackett, Lawrence
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0175-7598 ; E-ISSN: 1432-0614 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00253-011-3821-2
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-011-3821-2
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s00253-011-3821-2
title: Silica gel-encapsulated AtzA biocatalyst for atrazine biodegradation
format: Article
creator:
  • Reátegui, Eduardo
  • Reynolds, Erik
  • Kasinkas, Lisa
  • Aggarwal, Amit
  • Sadowsky, Michael
  • Aksan, Alptekin
  • Wackett, Lawrence
subjects:
  • Atrazine
  • Silica
  • Bacteria
  • Biodegradation
  • AtzA
  • E. coli
ispartof: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2012, Vol.96(1), pp.231-240
description: Encapsulation of recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a biocatalyst has the potential to produce stable, long-lasting enzyme activity that can be used for numerous applications. The current study describes the use of this technology with recombinant E. coli cells expressing the atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme AtzA in a silica/polymer porous gel. This novel recombinant enzyme-based method utilizes both adsorption and degradation to remove atrazine from water. A combination of silica nanoparticles (Ludox TM40), alkoxides, and an organic polymer was used to synthesize a porous gel. Gel curing temperatures of 23 or 45 °C were used either to maintain cell viability or to render the cells non-viable, respectively. The enzymatic activity of the encapsulated viable and non-viable cells was high and extremely stable over the time period analyzed. At room temperature, the encapsulated non-viable cells maintained a specific activity between (0.44 ± 0.06) μmol/g/min and (0.66 ± 0.12) μmol/g/min for up to 4 months, comparing well with free, viable cell-specific activities (0.61 ± 0.04 μmol/g/min). Gels cured at 45 °C had excellent structural rigidity and contained few viable cells, making these gels potentially compatible with water treatment facility applications. When encapsulated, non-viable cells were assayed at 4 °C, the activity increased threefold over free cells, potentially due to differences in lipid membranes as shown by FTIR spectroscopy and electron microscopy.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0175-7598 ; E-ISSN: 1432-0614 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00253-011-3821-2
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1432-0614
  • 14320614
  • 0175-7598
  • 01757598
url: Link


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titleSilica gel-encapsulated AtzA biocatalyst for atrazine biodegradation
creatorReátegui, Eduardo ; Reynolds, Erik ; Kasinkas, Lisa ; Aggarwal, Amit ; Sadowsky, Michael ; Aksan, Alptekin ; Wackett, Lawrence
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subjectAtrazine ; Silica ; Bacteria ; Biodegradation ; AtzA ; E. coli
descriptionEncapsulation of recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a biocatalyst has the potential to produce stable, long-lasting enzyme activity that can be used for numerous applications. The current study describes the use of this technology with recombinant E. coli cells expressing the atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme AtzA in a silica/polymer porous gel. This novel recombinant enzyme-based method utilizes both adsorption and degradation to remove atrazine from water. A combination of silica nanoparticles (Ludox TM40), alkoxides, and an organic polymer was used to synthesize a porous gel. Gel curing temperatures of 23 or 45 °C were used either to maintain cell viability or to render the cells non-viable, respectively. The enzymatic activity of the encapsulated viable and non-viable cells was high and extremely stable over the time period analyzed. At room temperature, the encapsulated non-viable cells maintained a specific activity between (0.44 ± 0.06) μmol/g/min and (0.66 ± 0.12) μmol/g/min for up to 4 months, comparing well with free, viable cell-specific activities (0.61 ± 0.04 μmol/g/min). Gels cured at 45 °C had excellent structural rigidity and contained few viable cells, making these gels potentially compatible with water treatment facility applications. When encapsulated, non-viable cells were assayed at 4 °C, the activity increased threefold over free cells, potentially due to differences in lipid membranes as shown by FTIR spectroscopy and electron microscopy.
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titleSilica gel-encapsulated AtzA biocatalyst for atrazine biodegradation
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abstractEncapsulation of recombinant Escherichia coli cells expressing a biocatalyst has the potential to produce stable, long-lasting enzyme activity that can be used for numerous applications. The current study describes the use of this technology with recombinant E. coli cells expressing the atrazine-dechlorinating enzyme AtzA in a silica/polymer porous gel. This novel recombinant enzyme-based method utilizes both adsorption and degradation to remove atrazine from water. A combination of silica nanoparticles (Ludox TM40), alkoxides, and an organic polymer was used to synthesize a porous gel. Gel curing temperatures of 23 or 45 °C were used either to maintain cell viability or to render the cells non-viable, respectively. The enzymatic activity of the encapsulated viable and non-viable cells was high and extremely stable over the time period analyzed. At room temperature, the encapsulated non-viable cells maintained a specific activity between (0.44 ± 0.06) μmol/g/min and (0.66 ± 0.12) μmol/g/min for up to 4 months, comparing well with free, viable cell-specific activities (0.61 ± 0.04 μmol/g/min). Gels cured at 45 °C had excellent structural rigidity and contained few viable cells, making these gels potentially compatible with water treatment facility applications. When encapsulated, non-viable cells were assayed at 4 °C, the activity increased threefold over free cells, potentially due to differences in lipid membranes as shown by FTIR spectroscopy and electron microscopy.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer-Verlag
doi10.1007/s00253-011-3821-2
pages231-240
date2012-10