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TCDD administered on activated carbon eliminates bioavailability and subsequent shifts to a key murine gut commensal

Activated carbon (AC) is an increasingly attractive remediation alternative for the sequestration of dioxins at contaminated sites globally. However, the potential for AC to reduce the bioavailability of dioxins in mammals and the residing gut microbiota has received less attention. This question wa... Full description

Journal Title: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology 2017, Vol.101(19), pp.7409-7415
Main Author: Stedtfeld, Robert
Other Authors: Brett Sallach, J. , Crawford, Robert , Stedtfeld, Tiffany , Williams, Maggie , Waseem, Hassan , Johnston, Cliff , Li, Hui , Teppen, Brian , Kaminski, Norbert , Boyd, Stephen , Tiedje, James , Hashsham, Syed
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0175-7598 ; E-ISSN: 1432-0614 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00253-017-8460-9
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00253-017-8460-9
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s00253-017-8460-9
title: TCDD administered on activated carbon eliminates bioavailability and subsequent shifts to a key murine gut commensal
format: Article
creator:
  • Stedtfeld, Robert
  • Brett Sallach, J.
  • Crawford, Robert
  • Stedtfeld, Tiffany
  • Williams, Maggie
  • Waseem, Hassan
  • Johnston, Cliff
  • Li, Hui
  • Teppen, Brian
  • Kaminski, Norbert
  • Boyd, Stephen
  • Tiedje, James
  • Hashsham, Syed
subjects:
  • TCDD
  • Gut microbiome
  • Segmented filamentous bacteria
  • Dysbiosis
  • Activated carbon sequestration
  • Corn oil
  • Remediation
  • Dioxin
ispartof: Applied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2017, Vol.101(19), pp.7409-7415
description: Activated carbon (AC) is an increasingly attractive remediation alternative for the sequestration of dioxins at contaminated sites globally. However, the potential for AC to reduce the bioavailability of dioxins in mammals and the residing gut microbiota has received less attention. This question was partially answered in a recent study examining 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin (TCDD)-induced hallmark toxic responses in mice administered with TCDD sequestered by AC or freely available in corn oil by oral gavage. Results from that study support the use of AC to significantly reduce the bioavailability of TCDD to the host. Herein, we examined the bioavailability of TCDD sequestered to AC on a key murine gut commensal and the influence of AC on the community structure of the gut microbiota. The analysis included qPCR to quantify the expression of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) in the mouse ileum, which has responded to TCDD-induced host toxicity in previous studies and community structure via sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. The expression of SFB 16S rRNA gene and functional genes significantly increased with TCDD administered with corn oil vehicle. Such a response was absent when TCDD was sequestered by AC. In addition, AC appeared to have a minimal influence on murine gut community structure and diversity, affecting only the relative abundance of Lactobacillaceae and two other groups. Results of this study further support the remedial use of AC for eliminating bioavailability of TCDD to host and subsequent influence on the gut microbiome.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0175-7598 ; E-ISSN: 1432-0614 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00253-017-8460-9
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1432-0614
  • 14320614
  • 0175-7598
  • 01757598
url: Link


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titleTCDD administered on activated carbon eliminates bioavailability and subsequent shifts to a key murine gut commensal
creatorStedtfeld, Robert ; Brett Sallach, J. ; Crawford, Robert ; Stedtfeld, Tiffany ; Williams, Maggie ; Waseem, Hassan ; Johnston, Cliff ; Li, Hui ; Teppen, Brian ; Kaminski, Norbert ; Boyd, Stephen ; Tiedje, James ; Hashsham, Syed
ispartofApplied Microbiology and Biotechnology, 2017, Vol.101(19), pp.7409-7415
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subjectTCDD ; Gut microbiome ; Segmented filamentous bacteria ; Dysbiosis ; Activated carbon sequestration ; Corn oil ; Remediation ; Dioxin
descriptionActivated carbon (AC) is an increasingly attractive remediation alternative for the sequestration of dioxins at contaminated sites globally. However, the potential for AC to reduce the bioavailability of dioxins in mammals and the residing gut microbiota has received less attention. This question was partially answered in a recent study examining 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin (TCDD)-induced hallmark toxic responses in mice administered with TCDD sequestered by AC or freely available in corn oil by oral gavage. Results from that study support the use of AC to significantly reduce the bioavailability of TCDD to the host. Herein, we examined the bioavailability of TCDD sequestered to AC on a key murine gut commensal and the influence of AC on the community structure of the gut microbiota. The analysis included qPCR to quantify the expression of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) in the mouse ileum, which has responded to TCDD-induced host toxicity in previous studies and community structure via sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. The expression of SFB 16S rRNA gene and functional genes significantly increased with TCDD administered with corn oil vehicle. Such a response was absent when TCDD was sequestered by AC. In addition, AC appeared to have a minimal influence on murine gut community structure and diversity, affecting only the relative abundance of Lactobacillaceae and two other groups. Results of this study further support the remedial use of AC for eliminating bioavailability of TCDD to host and subsequent influence on the gut microbiome.
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titleTCDD administered on activated carbon eliminates bioavailability and subsequent shifts to a key murine gut commensal
descriptionActivated carbon (AC) is an increasingly attractive remediation alternative for the sequestration of dioxins at contaminated sites globally. However, the potential for AC to reduce the bioavailability of dioxins in mammals and the residing gut microbiota has received less attention. This question was partially answered in a recent study examining 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin (TCDD)-induced hallmark toxic responses in mice administered with TCDD sequestered by AC or freely available in corn oil by oral gavage. Results from that study support the use of AC to significantly reduce the bioavailability of TCDD to the host. Herein, we examined the bioavailability of TCDD sequestered to AC on a key murine gut commensal and the influence of AC on the community structure of the gut microbiota. The analysis included qPCR to quantify the expression of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) in the mouse ileum, which has responded to TCDD-induced host toxicity in previous studies and community structure via sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. The expression of SFB 16S rRNA gene and functional genes significantly increased with TCDD administered with corn oil vehicle. Such a response was absent when TCDD was sequestered by AC. In addition, AC appeared to have a minimal influence on murine gut community structure and diversity, affecting only the relative abundance of Lactobacillaceae and two other groups. Results of this study further support the remedial use of AC for eliminating bioavailability of TCDD to host and subsequent influence on the gut microbiome.
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authorStedtfeld, Robert ; Brett Sallach, J. ; Crawford, Robert ; Stedtfeld, Tiffany ; Williams, Maggie ; Waseem, Hassan ; Johnston, Cliff ; Li, Hui ; Teppen, Brian ; Kaminski, Norbert ; Boyd, Stephen ; Tiedje, James ; Hashsham, Syed
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abstractActivated carbon (AC) is an increasingly attractive remediation alternative for the sequestration of dioxins at contaminated sites globally. However, the potential for AC to reduce the bioavailability of dioxins in mammals and the residing gut microbiota has received less attention. This question was partially answered in a recent study examining 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo- p -dioxin (TCDD)-induced hallmark toxic responses in mice administered with TCDD sequestered by AC or freely available in corn oil by oral gavage. Results from that study support the use of AC to significantly reduce the bioavailability of TCDD to the host. Herein, we examined the bioavailability of TCDD sequestered to AC on a key murine gut commensal and the influence of AC on the community structure of the gut microbiota. The analysis included qPCR to quantify the expression of segmented filamentous bacteria (SFB) in the mouse ileum, which has responded to TCDD-induced host toxicity in previous studies and community structure via sequencing the 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) gene. The expression of SFB 16S rRNA gene and functional genes significantly increased with TCDD administered with corn oil vehicle. Such a response was absent when TCDD was sequestered by AC. In addition, AC appeared to have a minimal influence on murine gut community structure and diversity, affecting only the relative abundance of Lactobacillaceae and two other groups. Results of this study further support the remedial use of AC for eliminating bioavailability of TCDD to host and subsequent influence on the gut microbiome.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer Berlin Heidelberg
doi10.1007/s00253-017-8460-9
pages7409-7415
date2017-10