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Is ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament an enthesopathy?

The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) with enthesis, the site where the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) attaches to the vertebral body, by multi-detector CT reconstruction images. Twenty-nine patients with OPLL w... Full description

Journal Title: International Orthopaedics 2011, Vol.35(10), pp.1511-1516
Main Author: Chen, Jian
Other Authors: Song, Dianwen , Wang, Xinwei , Shen, Xiaolong , Li, Yang , Yuan, Wen
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0341-2695 ; E-ISSN: 1432-5195 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00264-010-1163-9
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00264-010-1163-9
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s00264-010-1163-9
title: Is ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament an enthesopathy?
format: Article
creator:
  • Chen, Jian
  • Song, Dianwen
  • Wang, Xinwei
  • Shen, Xiaolong
  • Li, Yang
  • Yuan, Wen
subjects:
  • Ligaments
  • Ossification
  • Image Processing
  • Plaques
  • Vertebrae
  • Image Processing
  • Ligaments
  • Ossification
  • Plaques
  • Vertebrae
  • Ectopic Calcification and Ossification
ispartof: International Orthopaedics, 2011, Vol.35(10), pp.1511-1516
description: The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) with enthesis, the site where the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) attaches to the vertebral body, by multi-detector CT reconstruction images. Twenty-nine patients with OPLL were studied. According to the plaques’ continuity to the vertebral body, OPLL plaques were classified into two categories: “free” and “contiguous”. A “broken sign” was defined as a crack between two plaques. The sites where each “contiguous” plaque attached to the vertebral body were then analysed. There were 78 ossified plaques in total, and six were “free”. There were eight cases with a “broken sign”, including six “free” ones. The site where all 72 “contiguous” plaques attached to the vertebral body included the zone where the PLL enthesis was situated, while other zones were included in only part of the plaques. Our conclusion was that there might be no real “free type” ossified plaques, and OPLL could start from enthesis, which indicated OPLL could be a kind of enthesopathy.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0341-2695 ; E-ISSN: 1432-5195 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00264-010-1163-9
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1432-5195
  • 14325195
  • 0341-2695
  • 03412695
url: Link


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titleIs ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament an enthesopathy?
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ispartofInternational Orthopaedics, 2011, Vol.35(10), pp.1511-1516
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descriptionThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) with enthesis, the site where the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) attaches to the vertebral body, by multi-detector CT reconstruction images. Twenty-nine patients with OPLL were studied. According to the plaques’ continuity to the vertebral body, OPLL plaques were classified into two categories: “free” and “contiguous”. A “broken sign” was defined as a crack between two plaques. The sites where each “contiguous” plaque attached to the vertebral body were then analysed. There were 78 ossified plaques in total, and six were “free”. There were eight cases with a “broken sign”, including six “free” ones. The site where all 72 “contiguous” plaques attached to the vertebral body included the zone where the PLL enthesis was situated, while other zones were included in only part of the plaques. Our conclusion was that there might be no real “free type” ossified plaques, and OPLL could start from enthesis, which indicated OPLL could be a kind of enthesopathy.
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subjectLigaments ; Ossification ; Image Processing ; Plaques ; Vertebrae ; Image Processing ; Ligaments ; Ossification ; Plaques ; Vertebrae ; Ectopic Calcification and Ossification;
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titleIs ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament an enthesopathy?
descriptionThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) with enthesis, the site where the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) attaches to the vertebral body, by multi-detector CT reconstruction images. Twenty-nine patients with OPLL were studied. According to the plaques’ continuity to the vertebral body, OPLL plaques were classified into two categories: “free” and “contiguous”. A “broken sign” was defined as a crack between two plaques. The sites where each “contiguous” plaque attached to the vertebral body were then analysed. There were 78 ossified plaques in total, and six were “free”. There were eight cases with a “broken sign”, including six “free” ones. The site where all 72 “contiguous” plaques attached to the vertebral body included the zone where the PLL enthesis was situated, while other zones were included in only part of the plaques. Our conclusion was that there might be no real “free type” ossified plaques, and OPLL could start from enthesis, which indicated OPLL could be a kind of enthesopathy.
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abstractThe purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship of ossification of posterior longitudinal ligament (OPLL) with enthesis, the site where the posterior longitudinal ligament (PLL) attaches to the vertebral body, by multi-detector CT reconstruction images. Twenty-nine patients with OPLL were studied. According to the plaques’ continuity to the vertebral body, OPLL plaques were classified into two categories: “free” and “contiguous”. A “broken sign” was defined as a crack between two plaques. The sites where each “contiguous” plaque attached to the vertebral body were then analysed. There were 78 ossified plaques in total, and six were “free”. There were eight cases with a “broken sign”, including six “free” ones. The site where all 72 “contiguous” plaques attached to the vertebral body included the zone where the PLL enthesis was situated, while other zones were included in only part of the plaques. Our conclusion was that there might be no real “free type” ossified plaques, and OPLL could start from enthesis, which indicated OPLL could be a kind of enthesopathy.
copBerlin/Heidelberg
pubSpringer-Verlag
doi10.1007/s00264-010-1163-9
pages1511-1516
date2011-10