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The effect of anthropogenic activities on the reduction of urban tree sensitivity to climatic change: dendrochronological evidence from Chinese pine in Shenyang city

To understand how urban tree growth has responded to the accelerating expansion in population and urbanization, an understanding of the tree-climate–urban ecosystem relationship is necessary. To this end, a metropolitan, suburban, and rural forest stand in and near Shenyang; and a rural forest stand... Full description

Journal Title: Trees 2011, Vol.25(3), pp.393-405
Main Author: Chen, Zhenju
Other Authors: He, Xingyuan , Cui, Mingxing , Davi, Nicole , Zhang, Xianliang , Chen, Wei , Sun, Yu
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0931-1890 ; E-ISSN: 1432-2285 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00468-010-0514-x
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s00468-010-0514-x
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s00468-010-0514-x
title: The effect of anthropogenic activities on the reduction of urban tree sensitivity to climatic change: dendrochronological evidence from Chinese pine in Shenyang city
format: Article
creator:
  • Chen, Zhenju
  • He, Xingyuan
  • Cui, Mingxing
  • Davi, Nicole
  • Zhang, Xianliang
  • Chen, Wei
  • Sun, Yu
subjects:
  • Anthropogenic activity
  • Urban expansion
  • Tree ring
  • Climatic change
  • Environmental contamination
ispartof: Trees, 2011, Vol.25(3), pp.393-405
description: To understand how urban tree growth has responded to the accelerating expansion in population and urbanization, an understanding of the tree-climate–urban ecosystem relationship is necessary. To this end, a metropolitan, suburban, and rural forest stand in and near Shenyang; and a rural forest stand in Weichang, were sampled in southern Northeast China. Radial growth variability of 109 Chinese pines ( Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.), established before 1900 within and around the city, was measured. The contents of trace elements in tree rings were also examined to detect the possible relationship to urban environmental contamination. All sampled trees crossdated well, indicating a homogeneous common influence of regional climate. For the common period of 1901–2000, the radial growth of all trees was significantly affected by local and regional climate, especially temperature and precipitation in winter and spring, respectively. From the rural to the metropolitan areas, a significant decreasing relationship in the response of trees to climatic factors was detected. These decreases occurred over time and in tree stands within the same location or between different sites, and also corresponded with the increasing influence of local urbanization and industrialization on the urban environment during the last century. Particularly strong influences are the increase of population, urban built-up area, and urban agricultural and industrial activities. Decreases in mean sensitivity of Chinese pines were also found and are most likely related to the intensification of anthropogenic activities and environmental change. Based on tree-ring width growth in rural areas, a growth pattern of urban trees without anthropogenic disturbances was established. After removing the climate-related signals from actual urban tree growth, the impact of anthropogenic disturbances was chronologically developed. The results indicate that the periods of heaviest disturbances occurred from 1914 to 1922, 1932 to 1935, 1943 to 1946, 1955 to 1969, and 1973 to 2000.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0931-1890 ; E-ISSN: 1432-2285 ; DOI: 10.1007/s00468-010-0514-x
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1432-2285
  • 14322285
  • 0931-1890
  • 09311890
url: Link


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titleThe effect of anthropogenic activities on the reduction of urban tree sensitivity to climatic change: dendrochronological evidence from Chinese pine in Shenyang city
creatorChen, Zhenju ; He, Xingyuan ; Cui, Mingxing ; Davi, Nicole ; Zhang, Xianliang ; Chen, Wei ; Sun, Yu
ispartofTrees, 2011, Vol.25(3), pp.393-405
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subjectAnthropogenic activity ; Urban expansion ; Tree ring ; Climatic change ; Environmental contamination
descriptionTo understand how urban tree growth has responded to the accelerating expansion in population and urbanization, an understanding of the tree-climate–urban ecosystem relationship is necessary. To this end, a metropolitan, suburban, and rural forest stand in and near Shenyang; and a rural forest stand in Weichang, were sampled in southern Northeast China. Radial growth variability of 109 Chinese pines ( Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.), established before 1900 within and around the city, was measured. The contents of trace elements in tree rings were also examined to detect the possible relationship to urban environmental contamination. All sampled trees crossdated well, indicating a homogeneous common influence of regional climate. For the common period of 1901–2000, the radial growth of all trees was significantly affected by local and regional climate, especially temperature and precipitation in winter and spring, respectively. From the rural to the metropolitan areas, a significant decreasing relationship in the response of trees to climatic factors was detected. These decreases occurred over time and in tree stands within the same location or between different sites, and also corresponded with the increasing influence of local urbanization and industrialization on the urban environment during the last century. Particularly strong influences are the increase of population, urban built-up area, and urban agricultural and industrial activities. Decreases in mean sensitivity of Chinese pines were also found and are most likely related to the intensification of anthropogenic activities and environmental change. Based on tree-ring width growth in rural areas, a growth pattern of urban trees without anthropogenic disturbances was established. After removing the climate-related signals from actual urban tree growth, the impact of anthropogenic disturbances was chronologically developed. The results indicate that the periods of heaviest disturbances occurred from 1914 to 1922, 1932 to 1935, 1943 to 1946, 1955 to 1969, and 1973 to 2000.
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abstractTo understand how urban tree growth has responded to the accelerating expansion in population and urbanization, an understanding of the tree-climate–urban ecosystem relationship is necessary. To this end, a metropolitan, suburban, and rural forest stand in and near Shenyang; and a rural forest stand in Weichang, were sampled in southern Northeast China. Radial growth variability of 109 Chinese pines ( Pinus tabulaeformis Carr.), established before 1900 within and around the city, was measured. The contents of trace elements in tree rings were also examined to detect the possible relationship to urban environmental contamination. All sampled trees crossdated well, indicating a homogeneous common influence of regional climate. For the common period of 1901–2000, the radial growth of all trees was significantly affected by local and regional climate, especially temperature and precipitation in winter and spring, respectively. From the rural to the metropolitan areas, a significant decreasing relationship in the response of trees to climatic factors was detected. These decreases occurred over time and in tree stands within the same location or between different sites, and also corresponded with the increasing influence of local urbanization and industrialization on the urban environment during the last century. Particularly strong influences are the increase of population, urban built-up area, and urban agricultural and industrial activities. Decreases in mean sensitivity of Chinese pines were also found and are most likely related to the intensification of anthropogenic activities and environmental change. Based on tree-ring width growth in rural areas, a growth pattern of urban trees without anthropogenic disturbances was established. After removing the climate-related signals from actual urban tree growth, the impact of anthropogenic disturbances was chronologically developed. The results indicate that the periods of heaviest disturbances occurred from 1914 to 1922, 1932 to 1935, 1943 to 1946, 1955 to 1969, and 1973 to 2000.
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doi10.1007/s00468-010-0514-x
pages393-405
date2011-06