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An adolescent girl with Meyer-Betz syndrome

Idiopathic paroxysmal rhabdomyolysis indicating a classical triad of symptoms consisting of muscle pain, weakness, and discolored urine is known as “Meyer-Betz syndrome”. It may result in acute renal failure due to precipitation of the myoglobin casts in the tubuli or to the direct toxic effects of... Full description

Journal Title: Clinical Rheumatology 2006, Vol.25(6), pp.904-906
Main Author: Kasap, Belde
Other Authors: Soylu, Alper , Türkmen, Mehmet , Kavukcu, Salih
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0770-3198 ; E-ISSN: 1434-9949 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10067-005-0091-3
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10067-005-0091-3
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10067-005-0091-3
title: An adolescent girl with Meyer-Betz syndrome
format: Article
creator:
  • Kasap, Belde
  • Soylu, Alper
  • Türkmen, Mehmet
  • Kavukcu, Salih
subjects:
  • Adolescent girl
  • Meyer-Betz syndrome
ispartof: Clinical Rheumatology, 2006, Vol.25(6), pp.904-906
description: Idiopathic paroxysmal rhabdomyolysis indicating a classical triad of symptoms consisting of muscle pain, weakness, and discolored urine is known as “Meyer-Betz syndrome”. It may result in acute renal failure due to precipitation of the myoglobin casts in the tubuli or to the direct toxic effects of myoglobin to the tubular epithelium. On the other hand, outcome may be uneventful. In this study, we reported the case of a 16-year-old girl who was admitted with red-colored urine after a slight exertion. She had tenderness and weakness in upper parts of her legs and bilateral flank pain. She had a positive urine dipstick test for heme despite absent red cells on microscopic examination. White cell count, liver function tests, serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and urine myoglobin levels were raised. All metabolic tests were in normal ranges and EMG was normal. A muscle biopsy performed after recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis attacks demonstrated normal findings and ruled out metabolic disorders. At the time of attacks, hydration along with alkalinization was applied and she did not experience renal failure. She was advised to avoid strenuous physical exertion and had an uneventful outcome for the last 5 months. We reported the clinical course and follow-up of an adolescent girl with Meyer-Betz syndrome.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0770-3198 ; E-ISSN: 1434-9949 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10067-005-0091-3
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1434-9949
  • 14349949
  • 0770-3198
  • 07703198
url: Link


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descriptionIdiopathic paroxysmal rhabdomyolysis indicating a classical triad of symptoms consisting of muscle pain, weakness, and discolored urine is known as “Meyer-Betz syndrome”. It may result in acute renal failure due to precipitation of the myoglobin casts in the tubuli or to the direct toxic effects of myoglobin to the tubular epithelium. On the other hand, outcome may be uneventful. In this study, we reported the case of a 16-year-old girl who was admitted with red-colored urine after a slight exertion. She had tenderness and weakness in upper parts of her legs and bilateral flank pain. She had a positive urine dipstick test for heme despite absent red cells on microscopic examination. White cell count, liver function tests, serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and urine myoglobin levels were raised. All metabolic tests were in normal ranges and EMG was normal. A muscle biopsy performed after recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis attacks demonstrated normal findings and ruled out metabolic disorders. At the time of attacks, hydration along with alkalinization was applied and she did not experience renal failure. She was advised to avoid strenuous physical exertion and had an uneventful outcome for the last 5 months. We reported the clinical course and follow-up of an adolescent girl with Meyer-Betz syndrome.
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descriptionIdiopathic paroxysmal rhabdomyolysis indicating a classical triad of symptoms consisting of muscle pain, weakness, and discolored urine is known as “Meyer-Betz syndrome”. It may result in acute renal failure due to precipitation of the myoglobin casts in the tubuli or to the direct toxic effects of myoglobin to the tubular epithelium. On the other hand, outcome may be uneventful. In this study, we reported the case of a 16-year-old girl who was admitted with red-colored urine after a slight exertion. She had tenderness and weakness in upper parts of her legs and bilateral flank pain. She had a positive urine dipstick test for heme despite absent red cells on microscopic examination. White cell count, liver function tests, serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and urine myoglobin levels were raised. All metabolic tests were in normal ranges and EMG was normal. A muscle biopsy performed after recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis attacks demonstrated normal findings and ruled out metabolic disorders. At the time of attacks, hydration along with alkalinization was applied and she did not experience renal failure. She was advised to avoid strenuous physical exertion and had an uneventful outcome for the last 5 months. We reported the clinical course and follow-up of an adolescent girl with Meyer-Betz syndrome.
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abstractIdiopathic paroxysmal rhabdomyolysis indicating a classical triad of symptoms consisting of muscle pain, weakness, and discolored urine is known as “Meyer-Betz syndrome”. It may result in acute renal failure due to precipitation of the myoglobin casts in the tubuli or to the direct toxic effects of myoglobin to the tubular epithelium. On the other hand, outcome may be uneventful. In this study, we reported the case of a 16-year-old girl who was admitted with red-colored urine after a slight exertion. She had tenderness and weakness in upper parts of her legs and bilateral flank pain. She had a positive urine dipstick test for heme despite absent red cells on microscopic examination. White cell count, liver function tests, serum creatine kinase (CK), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and urine myoglobin levels were raised. All metabolic tests were in normal ranges and EMG was normal. A muscle biopsy performed after recurrent exertional rhabdomyolysis attacks demonstrated normal findings and ruled out metabolic disorders. At the time of attacks, hydration along with alkalinization was applied and she did not experience renal failure. She was advised to avoid strenuous physical exertion and had an uneventful outcome for the last 5 months. We reported the clinical course and follow-up of an adolescent girl with Meyer-Betz syndrome.
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doi10.1007/s10067-005-0091-3
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date2006-11