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Social Networks for Mental Health Clients: Resources and Solution

Several studies have illustrated the importance of social support and social networks for persons with mental health problems. Social networks may mean a reduced need for professional services, but also help to facilitate access to professional help. The interplay between social networks and profess... Full description

Journal Title: Community Mental Health Journal 2013, Vol.49(1), pp.95-100
Main Author: Kogstad, Ragnfrid
Other Authors: Mönness, Erik , Sörensen, Tom
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0010-3853 ; E-ISSN: 1573-2789 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10597-012-9491-4
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10597-012-9491-4
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10597-012-9491-4
title: Social Networks for Mental Health Clients: Resources and Solution
format: Article
creator:
  • Kogstad, Ragnfrid
  • Mönness, Erik
  • Sörensen, Tom
subjects:
  • Social support
  • Networks
  • Mental health clients
ispartof: Community Mental Health Journal, 2013, Vol.49(1), pp.95-100
description: Several studies have illustrated the importance of social support and social networks for persons with mental health problems. Social networks may mean a reduced need for professional services, but also help to facilitate access to professional help. The interplay between social networks and professional services is complicated and invites further investigation. Compare aspects of clients’ experiences with social networks to experiences with professional services and learn about the relationship between network resources and help from the public health service system. Quantitative analyses of a sample of 850 informants. Supportive networks exist for a majority of the informants and can also be a substitute for public/professional services in many respects. Regarding help to recover, social networks may offer qualities equal to those of professional services. Furthermore, there is a positive relationship between trust in a social network and trust in public professional services. Trust in a social network also increases the probability of achieving positive experiences with professional services. Our findings imply that more network qualities should be included in professional services, and also that professionals should assist vulnerable groups in building networks.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0010-3853 ; E-ISSN: 1573-2789 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10597-012-9491-4
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-2789
  • 15732789
  • 0010-3853
  • 00103853
url: Link


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descriptionSeveral studies have illustrated the importance of social support and social networks for persons with mental health problems. Social networks may mean a reduced need for professional services, but also help to facilitate access to professional help. The interplay between social networks and professional services is complicated and invites further investigation. Compare aspects of clients’ experiences with social networks to experiences with professional services and learn about the relationship between network resources and help from the public health service system. Quantitative analyses of a sample of 850 informants. Supportive networks exist for a majority of the informants and can also be a substitute for public/professional services in many respects. Regarding help to recover, social networks may offer qualities equal to those of professional services. Furthermore, there is a positive relationship between trust in a social network and trust in public professional services. Trust in a social network also increases the probability of achieving positive experiences with professional services. Our findings imply that more network qualities should be included in professional services, and also that professionals should assist vulnerable groups in building networks.
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abstractSeveral studies have illustrated the importance of social support and social networks for persons with mental health problems. Social networks may mean a reduced need for professional services, but also help to facilitate access to professional help. The interplay between social networks and professional services is complicated and invites further investigation. Compare aspects of clients’ experiences with social networks to experiences with professional services and learn about the relationship between network resources and help from the public health service system. Quantitative analyses of a sample of 850 informants. Supportive networks exist for a majority of the informants and can also be a substitute for public/professional services in many respects. Regarding help to recover, social networks may offer qualities equal to those of professional services. Furthermore, there is a positive relationship between trust in a social network and trust in public professional services. Trust in a social network also increases the probability of achieving positive experiences with professional services. Our findings imply that more network qualities should be included in professional services, and also that professionals should assist vulnerable groups in building networks.
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