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Assessing exposure risks for freshwater tilapia species posed by mercury and methylmercury

Waterborne and dietborne exposures of freshwater fish to mercury (Hg) in the forms of inorganic (Hg(II)) and organic (methylmercury or MeHg) affect their growth, development, and reproduction. However, an integrated mechanistic risk model framework to predict the impact of Hg(II)/MeHg on freshwater... Full description

Journal Title: Ecotoxicology 2016, Vol.25(6), pp.1181-1193
Main Author: Cheng, Yi-Hsien
Other Authors: Lin, Yi-Jun , You, Shu-Han , Yang, Ying-Fei , How, Chun , Tseng, Yi-Ting , Chen, Wei-Yu , Liao, Chung-Min
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0963-9292 ; E-ISSN: 1573-3017 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10646-016-1672-4
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10646-016-1672-4
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10646-016-1672-4
title: Assessing exposure risks for freshwater tilapia species posed by mercury and methylmercury
format: Article
creator:
  • Cheng, Yi-Hsien
  • Lin, Yi-Jun
  • You, Shu-Han
  • Yang, Ying-Fei
  • How, Chun
  • Tseng, Yi-Ting
  • Chen, Wei-Yu
  • Liao, Chung-Min
subjects:
  • Mercury
  • Freshwater tilapia
  • Modeling
  • Environmental risk assessment
ispartof: Ecotoxicology, 2016, Vol.25(6), pp.1181-1193
description: Waterborne and dietborne exposures of freshwater fish to mercury (Hg) in the forms of inorganic (Hg(II)) and organic (methylmercury or MeHg) affect their growth, development, and reproduction. However, an integrated mechanistic risk model framework to predict the impact of Hg(II)/MeHg on freshwater fish is lacking. Here, we integrated biokinetic, physiological and biogeographic data to calibrate and then establish key risk indices—hazardous quotient and exceedance risk—for freshwater tilapia species across geographic ranges of several major rivers in Taiwan. We found that Hg(II) burden was highest in kidney followed by gill, intestine, liver, blood, and muscle. Our results showed that Hg was less likely to pose mortality risk (mortality rate less than 5 %) for freshwater tilapia species. However, Hg is likely to pose the potential hazard to aquatic environments constrained by safety levels for aquatic organisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that amount of Hg accumulated in tilapia was most influenced by sediment uptake rate. Our approach opens up new possibilities for predicting future fish population health with the impacts of continued Hg exposure to provide information on which fish are deemed safe for human consumption.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0963-9292 ; E-ISSN: 1573-3017 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10646-016-1672-4
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-3017
  • 15733017
  • 0963-9292
  • 09639292
url: Link


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titleAssessing exposure risks for freshwater tilapia species posed by mercury and methylmercury
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subjectMercury ; Freshwater tilapia ; Modeling ; Environmental risk assessment
descriptionWaterborne and dietborne exposures of freshwater fish to mercury (Hg) in the forms of inorganic (Hg(II)) and organic (methylmercury or MeHg) affect their growth, development, and reproduction. However, an integrated mechanistic risk model framework to predict the impact of Hg(II)/MeHg on freshwater fish is lacking. Here, we integrated biokinetic, physiological and biogeographic data to calibrate and then establish key risk indices—hazardous quotient and exceedance risk—for freshwater tilapia species across geographic ranges of several major rivers in Taiwan. We found that Hg(II) burden was highest in kidney followed by gill, intestine, liver, blood, and muscle. Our results showed that Hg was less likely to pose mortality risk (mortality rate less than 5 %) for freshwater tilapia species. However, Hg is likely to pose the potential hazard to aquatic environments constrained by safety levels for aquatic organisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that amount of Hg accumulated in tilapia was most influenced by sediment uptake rate. Our approach opens up new possibilities for predicting future fish population health with the impacts of continued Hg exposure to provide information on which fish are deemed safe for human consumption.
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abstractWaterborne and dietborne exposures of freshwater fish to mercury (Hg) in the forms of inorganic (Hg(II)) and organic (methylmercury or MeHg) affect their growth, development, and reproduction. However, an integrated mechanistic risk model framework to predict the impact of Hg(II)/MeHg on freshwater fish is lacking. Here, we integrated biokinetic, physiological and biogeographic data to calibrate and then establish key risk indices—hazardous quotient and exceedance risk—for freshwater tilapia species across geographic ranges of several major rivers in Taiwan. We found that Hg(II) burden was highest in kidney followed by gill, intestine, liver, blood, and muscle. Our results showed that Hg was less likely to pose mortality risk (mortality rate less than 5 %) for freshwater tilapia species. However, Hg is likely to pose the potential hazard to aquatic environments constrained by safety levels for aquatic organisms. Sensitivity analysis showed that amount of Hg accumulated in tilapia was most influenced by sediment uptake rate. Our approach opens up new possibilities for predicting future fish population health with the impacts of continued Hg exposure to provide information on which fish are deemed safe for human consumption.
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pubSpringer US
doi10.1007/s10646-016-1672-4
pages1181-1193
date2016-08