schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

The geographic distribution of trace elements in the environment: the REGARDS study

Research on trace elements and the effects of their ingestion on human health is often seen in scientific literature. However, little research has been done on the distribution of trace elements in the environment and their impact on health. This paper examines what characteristics among participant... Full description

Journal Title: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment 2017, Vol.189(2), pp.1-11
Main Author: Rembert, Nicole
Other Authors: He, Ka , Judd, Suzanne , McClure, Leslie
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0167-6369 ; E-ISSN: 1573-2959 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
title: The geographic distribution of trace elements in the environment: the REGARDS study
format: Article
creator:
  • Rembert, Nicole
  • He, Ka
  • Judd, Suzanne
  • McClure, Leslie
subjects:
  • Trace elements
  • REGARDS study
  • Stroke
ispartof: Environmental Monitoring and Assessment, 2017, Vol.189(2), pp.1-11
description: Research on trace elements and the effects of their ingestion on human health is often seen in scientific literature. However, little research has been done on the distribution of trace elements in the environment and their impact on health. This paper examines what characteristics among participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study are associated with levels of environmental exposure to arsenic, magnesium, mercury, and selenium. Demographic information from REGARDS participants was combined with trace element concentration data from the US Geochemical Survey (USGS). Each trace element was characterized as either low (magnesium and selenium) or high (arsenic and mercury) exposure. Associations between demographic characteristics and trace element concentrations were analyzed with unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models. Individuals who reside in the Stroke Belt have lower odds of high exposure (4th quartile) to arsenic (OR 0.33, CI 0.31, 0.35) and increased exposure to mercury (OR 0.65, CI 0.62, 0.70) than those living outside of these areas, while the odds of low exposure to trace element concentrations were increased for magnesium (OR 5.48, CI 5.05, 5.95) and selenium (OR 2.37, CI 2.22, 2.54). We found an association between levels of trace elements in the environment and geographic region of residence, among other factors. Future studies are needed to further examine this association and determine whether or not these differences may be related to geographic variation in disease.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0167-6369 ; E-ISSN: 1573-2959 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-2959
  • 15732959
  • 0167-6369
  • 01676369
url: Link


@attributes
ID1856178061
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
sourceidspringer_jour
recordidTN_springer_jour10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
sourcesystemPC
pqid1865257403
galeid479444590
display
typearticle
titleThe geographic distribution of trace elements in the environment: the REGARDS study
creatorRembert, Nicole ; He, Ka ; Judd, Suzanne ; McClure, Leslie
ispartofEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessment, 2017, Vol.189(2), pp.1-11
identifier
subjectTrace elements ; REGARDS study ; Stroke
descriptionResearch on trace elements and the effects of their ingestion on human health is often seen in scientific literature. However, little research has been done on the distribution of trace elements in the environment and their impact on health. This paper examines what characteristics among participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study are associated with levels of environmental exposure to arsenic, magnesium, mercury, and selenium. Demographic information from REGARDS participants was combined with trace element concentration data from the US Geochemical Survey (USGS). Each trace element was characterized as either low (magnesium and selenium) or high (arsenic and mercury) exposure. Associations between demographic characteristics and trace element concentrations were analyzed with unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models. Individuals who reside in the Stroke Belt have lower odds of high exposure (4th quartile) to arsenic (OR 0.33, CI 0.31, 0.35) and increased exposure to mercury (OR 0.65, CI 0.62, 0.70) than those living outside of these areas, while the odds of low exposure to trace element concentrations were increased for magnesium (OR 5.48, CI 5.05, 5.95) and selenium (OR 2.37, CI 2.22, 2.54). We found an association between levels of trace elements in the environment and geographic region of residence, among other factors. Future studies are needed to further examine this association and determine whether or not these differences may be related to geographic variation in disease.
languageeng
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1$$EView_full_text_in_Springer_(Subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Rembert, Nicole, E.
1He, Ka, A.
2Judd, Suzanne, A.
3McClure, Leslie, A.
titleThe geographic distribution of trace elements in the environment: the REGARDS study
descriptionResearch on trace elements and the effects of their ingestion on human health is often seen in scientific literature. However, little research has been done on the distribution of trace elements in the environment and their impact on health. This paper examines what characteristics among participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study are associated with levels of environmental exposure to arsenic, magnesium, mercury, and selenium. Demographic information from REGARDS participants was combined with trace element concentration data from the US Geochemical Survey (USGS). Each trace element was characterized as either low (magnesium and selenium) or high (arsenic and mercury) exposure. Associations between demographic characteristics and trace element concentrations were analyzed with unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models. Individuals who reside in the Stroke Belt have lower odds of high exposure (4th quartile) to arsenic (OR 0.33, CI 0.31, 0.35) and increased exposure to mercury (OR 0.65, CI 0.62, 0.70) than those living outside of these areas, while the odds of low exposure to trace element concentrations were increased for magnesium (OR 5.48, CI 5.05, 5.95) and selenium (OR 2.37, CI 2.22, 2.54). We found an association between levels of trace elements in the environment and geographic region of residence, among other factors. Future studies are needed to further examine this association and determine whether or not these differences may be related to geographic variation in disease.
subject
0Trace elements
1REGARDS study
2Stroke
general
010.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
1English
2Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
3SpringerLink
sourceidspringer_jour
recordidspringer_jour10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
issn
01573-2959
115732959
20167-6369
301676369
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2017
addtitle
0Environmental Monitoring and Assessment
1An International Journal Devoted to Progress in the Use of Monitoring Data in Assessing Environmental Risks to Man and the Environment
2Environ Monit Assess
searchscopespringer_journals_complete
scopespringer_journals_complete
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[galeid, pqid, pages]
sort
titleThe geographic distribution of trace elements in the environment: the REGARDS study
authorRembert, Nicole ; He, Ka ; Judd, Suzanne ; McClure, Leslie
creationdate20170200
facets
frbrgroupid5408502920695825519
frbrtype5
newrecords20170208
languageeng
creationdate2017
topic
0Trace Elements
1Regards Study
2Stroke
collectionSpringerLink
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Rembert, Nicole
1He, Ka
2Judd, Suzanne
3McClure, Leslie
jtitleEnvironmental Monitoring And Assessment
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Rembert
1He
2Judd
3McClure
aufirst
0Nicole
1Ka
2Suzanne
3E.
4Leslie
5A.
au
0Rembert, Nicole
1He, Ka
2Judd, Suzanne
3McClure, Leslie
atitleThe geographic distribution of trace elements in the environment: the REGARDS study
jtitleEnvironmental Monitoring and Assessment
stitleEnviron Monit Assess
addtitleAn International Journal Devoted to Progress in the Use of Monitoring Data in Assessing Environmental Risks to Man and the Environment
risdate201702
volume189
issue2
spage1
epage11
issn0167-6369
eissn1573-2959
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractResearch on trace elements and the effects of their ingestion on human health is often seen in scientific literature. However, little research has been done on the distribution of trace elements in the environment and their impact on health. This paper examines what characteristics among participants in the Reasons for Geographic and Racial Differences in Stroke (REGARDS) study are associated with levels of environmental exposure to arsenic, magnesium, mercury, and selenium. Demographic information from REGARDS participants was combined with trace element concentration data from the US Geochemical Survey (USGS). Each trace element was characterized as either low (magnesium and selenium) or high (arsenic and mercury) exposure. Associations between demographic characteristics and trace element concentrations were analyzed with unadjusted and adjusted logistic regression models. Individuals who reside in the Stroke Belt have lower odds of high exposure (4th quartile) to arsenic (OR 0.33, CI 0.31, 0.35) and increased exposure to mercury (OR 0.65, CI 0.62, 0.70) than those living outside of these areas, while the odds of low exposure to trace element concentrations were increased for magnesium (OR 5.48, CI 5.05, 5.95) and selenium (OR 2.37, CI 2.22, 2.54). We found an association between levels of trace elements in the environment and geographic region of residence, among other factors. Future studies are needed to further examine this association and determine whether or not these differences may be related to geographic variation in disease.
copCham
pubSpringer International Publishing
doi10.1007/s10661-016-5733-1
pages1-11
date2017-02