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Stability of alginate microbead properties in vitro

Alginate microbeads have been investigated clinically for a number of therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery for treatment of ischemic tissues, cell delivery for tissue regeneration, and islet encapsulation as a therapy for type I diabetes. The physical properties of the microbeads play... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine 2012, Vol.23(4), pp.903-912
Main Author: Moya, Monica
Other Authors: Morley, Michael , Khanna, Omaditya , Opara, Emmanuel , Brey, Eric
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0957-4530 ; E-ISSN: 1573-4838 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10856-012-4575-9
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10856-012-4575-9
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10856-012-4575-9
title: Stability of alginate microbead properties in vitro
format: Article
creator:
  • Moya, Monica
  • Morley, Michael
  • Khanna, Omaditya
  • Opara, Emmanuel
  • Brey, Eric
subjects:
  • Drug Delivery Systems
  • Cells (Biology)
  • Diabetes Mellitus
ispartof: Journal of Materials Science: Materials in Medicine, 2012, Vol.23(4), pp.903-912
description: Alginate microbeads have been investigated clinically for a number of therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery for treatment of ischemic tissues, cell delivery for tissue regeneration, and islet encapsulation as a therapy for type I diabetes. The physical properties of the microbeads play an important role in regulating cell behavior, protein release, and biological response following implantation. In this research alginate microbeads were synthesized, varying composition (mannuronic acid to guluronic acid ratio), concentration of alginate and needle gauge size. Following synthesis, the size, volume fraction, and morphometry of the beads were quantified. In addition, these properties were monitored over time in vitro in the presence of varying calcium levels in the microenvironment. The initial volume available for solute diffusion increased with alginate concentration and mannuronic (M) acid content, and bead diameter decreased with M content but increased with needle diameter. Interestingly, microbeads eroded completely in saline in less than 3 weeks regardless of synthesis conditions much faster than what has been observed in vivo. However, microbead stability was increased by the addition of calcium in the culture medium. Beads synthesized with low alginate concentration and high G content exhibited a more rapid change in physical properties even in the presence of calcium. These data suggest that temporal variations in the physical characteristics of alginate microbeads can occur in vitro depending on synthesis conditions and microbead environment. The results presented here will assist in optimizing the design of the materials for clinical application in drug delivery and cell therapy.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0957-4530 ; E-ISSN: 1573-4838 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10856-012-4575-9
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-4838
  • 15734838
  • 0957-4530
  • 09574530
url: Link


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descriptionAlginate microbeads have been investigated clinically for a number of therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery for treatment of ischemic tissues, cell delivery for tissue regeneration, and islet encapsulation as a therapy for type I diabetes. The physical properties of the microbeads play an important role in regulating cell behavior, protein release, and biological response following implantation. In this research alginate microbeads were synthesized, varying composition (mannuronic acid to guluronic acid ratio), concentration of alginate and needle gauge size. Following synthesis, the size, volume fraction, and morphometry of the beads were quantified. In addition, these properties were monitored over time in vitro in the presence of varying calcium levels in the microenvironment. The initial volume available for solute diffusion increased with alginate concentration and mannuronic (M) acid content, and bead diameter decreased with M content but increased with needle diameter. Interestingly, microbeads eroded completely in saline in less than 3 weeks regardless of synthesis conditions much faster than what has been observed in vivo. However, microbead stability was increased by the addition of calcium in the culture medium. Beads synthesized with low alginate concentration and high G content exhibited a more rapid change in physical properties even in the presence of calcium. These data suggest that temporal variations in the physical characteristics of alginate microbeads can occur in vitro depending on synthesis conditions and microbead environment. The results presented here will assist in optimizing the design of the materials for clinical application in drug delivery and cell therapy.
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descriptionAlginate microbeads have been investigated clinically for a number of therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery for treatment of ischemic tissues, cell delivery for tissue regeneration, and islet encapsulation as a therapy for type I diabetes. The physical properties of the microbeads play an important role in regulating cell behavior, protein release, and biological response following implantation. In this research alginate microbeads were synthesized, varying composition (mannuronic acid to guluronic acid ratio), concentration of alginate and needle gauge size. Following synthesis, the size, volume fraction, and morphometry of the beads were quantified. In addition, these properties were monitored over time in vitro in the presence of varying calcium levels in the microenvironment. The initial volume available for solute diffusion increased with alginate concentration and mannuronic (M) acid content, and bead diameter decreased with M content but increased with needle diameter. Interestingly, microbeads eroded completely in saline in less than 3 weeks regardless of synthesis conditions much faster than what has been observed in vivo. However, microbead stability was increased by the addition of calcium in the culture medium. Beads synthesized with low alginate concentration and high G content exhibited a more rapid change in physical properties even in the presence of calcium. These data suggest that temporal variations in the physical characteristics of alginate microbeads can occur in vitro depending on synthesis conditions and microbead environment. The results presented here will assist in optimizing the design of the materials for clinical application in drug delivery and cell therapy.
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abstractAlginate microbeads have been investigated clinically for a number of therapeutic interventions, including drug delivery for treatment of ischemic tissues, cell delivery for tissue regeneration, and islet encapsulation as a therapy for type I diabetes. The physical properties of the microbeads play an important role in regulating cell behavior, protein release, and biological response following implantation. In this research alginate microbeads were synthesized, varying composition (mannuronic acid to guluronic acid ratio), concentration of alginate and needle gauge size. Following synthesis, the size, volume fraction, and morphometry of the beads were quantified. In addition, these properties were monitored over time in vitro in the presence of varying calcium levels in the microenvironment. The initial volume available for solute diffusion increased with alginate concentration and mannuronic (M) acid content, and bead diameter decreased with M content but increased with needle diameter. Interestingly, microbeads eroded completely in saline in less than 3 weeks regardless of synthesis conditions much faster than what has been observed in vivo. However, microbead stability was increased by the addition of calcium in the culture medium. Beads synthesized with low alginate concentration and high G content exhibited a more rapid change in physical properties even in the presence of calcium. These data suggest that temporal variations in the physical characteristics of alginate microbeads can occur in vitro depending on synthesis conditions and microbead environment. The results presented here will assist in optimizing the design of the materials for clinical application in drug delivery and cell therapy.
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