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Provision of Genetic Services for Hearing Loss: Results from a National Survey and Comparison to Insights Obtained from Previous Focus Group Discussions

Hearing loss is a common sensory deficit and more than 50% of affected individuals have a genetic etiology. The discovery of 40 genes and more than 100 loci involved in hearing loss has made genetic testing for some of these genes widely available. Genetic services for deafness are also being sought... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Genetic Counseling 2009, Vol.18(6), pp.618-621
Main Author: Withrow, Kara
Other Authors: Tracy, Kelly , Burton, Sarah , Norris, Virginia , Maes, Hermine , Arnos, Kathleen , Pandya, Arti
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1059-7700 ; E-ISSN: 1573-3599 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10897-009-9246-8
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10897-009-9246-8
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10897-009-9246-8
title: Provision of Genetic Services for Hearing Loss: Results from a National Survey and Comparison to Insights Obtained from Previous Focus Group Discussions
format: Article
creator:
  • Withrow, Kara
  • Tracy, Kelly
  • Burton, Sarah
  • Norris, Virginia
  • Maes, Hermine
  • Arnos, Kathleen
  • Pandya, Arti
subjects:
  • Hearing loss
  • Deafness
  • Genetic counseling
  • Genetics
  • Survey
ispartof: Journal of Genetic Counseling, 2009, Vol.18(6), pp.618-621
description: Hearing loss is a common sensory deficit and more than 50% of affected individuals have a genetic etiology. The discovery of 40 genes and more than 100 loci involved in hearing loss has made genetic testing for some of these genes widely available. Genetic services for deafness are also being sought more often due to the early identification of hearing loss through newborn screening services. The motivations for pursuing genetic testing, and how genetic services are provided to the client may differ among individuals. Additionally, information obtained through genetic testing can be perceived and used in different ways by parents of deaf children and deaf adults. This study aimed to follow up on focus group studies published earlier with a quantitative survey instrument and assess the preference of consumers for provision of genetic services. We conducted a national survey of hearing and deaf parents of children with hearing loss and of deaf adults. Data was compared and analyzed by hearing status of the participant, their community affiliation and the genetic testing status using nominal logistic regression. Consistent with our focus group results, the survey participants thought that a genetic counselor/geneticist would be the most appropriate professional to provide genetics services. Statistically significant differences were noted in the preferred choice of provider based on the genetic testing status. Parents preferred that genetic evaluation, including testing, occur either immediately at or a few months after the audiologic diagnosis of hearing loss. This data should help providers in clinical genetics keep patient preferences at the helm and provide culturally competent services.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1059-7700 ; E-ISSN: 1573-3599 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10897-009-9246-8
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-3599
  • 15733599
  • 1059-7700
  • 10597700
url: Link


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titleProvision of Genetic Services for Hearing Loss: Results from a National Survey and Comparison to Insights Obtained from Previous Focus Group Discussions
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subjectHearing loss ; Deafness ; Genetic counseling ; Genetics ; Survey
descriptionHearing loss is a common sensory deficit and more than 50% of affected individuals have a genetic etiology. The discovery of 40 genes and more than 100 loci involved in hearing loss has made genetic testing for some of these genes widely available. Genetic services for deafness are also being sought more often due to the early identification of hearing loss through newborn screening services. The motivations for pursuing genetic testing, and how genetic services are provided to the client may differ among individuals. Additionally, information obtained through genetic testing can be perceived and used in different ways by parents of deaf children and deaf adults. This study aimed to follow up on focus group studies published earlier with a quantitative survey instrument and assess the preference of consumers for provision of genetic services. We conducted a national survey of hearing and deaf parents of children with hearing loss and of deaf adults. Data was compared and analyzed by hearing status of the participant, their community affiliation and the genetic testing status using nominal logistic regression. Consistent with our focus group results, the survey participants thought that a genetic counselor/geneticist would be the most appropriate professional to provide genetics services. Statistically significant differences were noted in the preferred choice of provider based on the genetic testing status. Parents preferred that genetic evaluation, including testing, occur either immediately at or a few months after the audiologic diagnosis of hearing loss. This data should help providers in clinical genetics keep patient preferences at the helm and provide culturally competent services.
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titleProvision of Genetic Services for Hearing Loss: Results from a National Survey and Comparison to Insights Obtained from Previous Focus Group Discussions
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abstractHearing loss is a common sensory deficit and more than 50% of affected individuals have a genetic etiology. The discovery of 40 genes and more than 100 loci involved in hearing loss has made genetic testing for some of these genes widely available. Genetic services for deafness are also being sought more often due to the early identification of hearing loss through newborn screening services. The motivations for pursuing genetic testing, and how genetic services are provided to the client may differ among individuals. Additionally, information obtained through genetic testing can be perceived and used in different ways by parents of deaf children and deaf adults. This study aimed to follow up on focus group studies published earlier with a quantitative survey instrument and assess the preference of consumers for provision of genetic services. We conducted a national survey of hearing and deaf parents of children with hearing loss and of deaf adults. Data was compared and analyzed by hearing status of the participant, their community affiliation and the genetic testing status using nominal logistic regression. Consistent with our focus group results, the survey participants thought that a genetic counselor/geneticist would be the most appropriate professional to provide genetics services. Statistically significant differences were noted in the preferred choice of provider based on the genetic testing status. Parents preferred that genetic evaluation, including testing, occur either immediately at or a few months after the audiologic diagnosis of hearing loss. This data should help providers in clinical genetics keep patient preferences at the helm and provide culturally competent services.
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doi10.1007/s10897-009-9246-8
pages618-621
date2009-12