schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Gestational Weight Gain and Loss

We explored the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage (NSED) and gestational weight gain and loss and if the association differed by race. A census tract level NSED index (categorized as low, mid-low, mid-high, and high) was generated from 12 measures from the 2000 US Census d... Full description

Journal Title: Maternal and Child Health Journal 2014, Vol.18(5), pp.1095-1103
Main Author: Mendez, Dara
Other Authors: Doebler, Donna , Kim, Kevin , Amutah, Ndidi , Fabio, Anthony , Bodnar, Lisa
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1092-7875 ; E-ISSN: 1573-6628 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
title: Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Gestational Weight Gain and Loss
format: Article
creator:
  • Mendez, Dara
  • Doebler, Donna
  • Kim, Kevin
  • Amutah, Ndidi
  • Fabio, Anthony
  • Bodnar, Lisa
subjects:
  • Gestational weight gain and loss
  • Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage
  • Neighborhood conditions
  • Racial differences
ispartof: Maternal and Child Health Journal, 2014, Vol.18(5), pp.1095-1103
description: We explored the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage (NSED) and gestational weight gain and loss and if the association differed by race. A census tract level NSED index (categorized as low, mid-low, mid-high, and high) was generated from 12 measures from the 2000 US Census data. Gestational weight gain and other individual-level characteristics were derived from vital birth records for Allegheny County, PA for 2003–2010 (n = 55,608). Crude and adjusted relative risks were estimated using modified multilevel Poisson regression models to estimate the association between NSED and excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) and weight loss (versus adequate GWG). Black women lived in neighborhoods that were more likely to be socioeconomically disadvantaged compared to white women. Almost 55 % of women gained an excessive amount of weight during pregnancy, and 2 % lost weight during pregnancy. Black women were more likely than white women to have inadequate weight gain or weight loss. Mid-high (aRR = 1.3, 95 % CI 1.2, 1.3) and high (aRR = 1.5, 95 % CI 1.5, 1.6) NSED compared to low NSED was associated with inadequate weight gain while NSED was not associated with excessive weight gain. Among black women, high versus low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy (RR = 1.6, 95 % CI 1.1, 2.5). Among white women, each level of NSED compared to low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy. This study demonstrates how neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics can contribute to our understanding of inadequate weight gain and weight loss during pregnancy, having implications for future research and interventions designed to advance pregnancy outcomes.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1092-7875 ; E-ISSN: 1573-6628 ; DOI: 10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-6628
  • 15736628
  • 1092-7875
  • 10927875
url: Link


@attributes
ID519331471
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
sourceidspringer_jour
recordidTN_springer_jour10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
sourcesystemPC
pqid1530951018
galeid383854479
display
typearticle
titleNeighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Gestational Weight Gain and Loss
creatorMendez, Dara ; Doebler, Donna ; Kim, Kevin ; Amutah, Ndidi ; Fabio, Anthony ; Bodnar, Lisa
ispartofMaternal and Child Health Journal, 2014, Vol.18(5), pp.1095-1103
identifier
subjectGestational weight gain and loss ; Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage ; Neighborhood conditions ; Racial differences
descriptionWe explored the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage (NSED) and gestational weight gain and loss and if the association differed by race. A census tract level NSED index (categorized as low, mid-low, mid-high, and high) was generated from 12 measures from the 2000 US Census data. Gestational weight gain and other individual-level characteristics were derived from vital birth records for Allegheny County, PA for 2003–2010 (n = 55,608). Crude and adjusted relative risks were estimated using modified multilevel Poisson regression models to estimate the association between NSED and excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) and weight loss (versus adequate GWG). Black women lived in neighborhoods that were more likely to be socioeconomically disadvantaged compared to white women. Almost 55 % of women gained an excessive amount of weight during pregnancy, and 2 % lost weight during pregnancy. Black women were more likely than white women to have inadequate weight gain or weight loss. Mid-high (aRR = 1.3, 95 % CI 1.2, 1.3) and high (aRR = 1.5, 95 % CI 1.5, 1.6) NSED compared to low NSED was associated with inadequate weight gain while NSED was not associated with excessive weight gain. Among black women, high versus low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy (RR = 1.6, 95 % CI 1.1, 2.5). Among white women, each level of NSED compared to low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy. This study demonstrates how neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics can contribute to our understanding of inadequate weight gain and weight loss during pregnancy, having implications for future research and interventions designed to advance pregnancy outcomes.
languageeng
source
version9
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1$$EView_full_text_in_Springer_(Subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontrib
0Mendez, Dara, D.
1Doebler, Donna, Almario
2Kim, Kevin, H.
3Amutah, Ndidi, N.
4Fabio, Anthony, M.
5Bodnar, Lisa, M.
titleNeighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Gestational Weight Gain and Loss
descriptionWe explored the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage (NSED) and gestational weight gain and loss and if the association differed by race. A census tract level NSED index (categorized as low, mid-low, mid-high, and high) was generated from 12 measures from the 2000 US Census data. Gestational weight gain and other individual-level characteristics were derived from vital birth records for Allegheny County, PA for 2003–2010 (n = 55,608). Crude and adjusted relative risks were estimated using modified multilevel Poisson regression models to estimate the association between NSED and excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) and weight loss (versus adequate GWG). Black women lived in neighborhoods that were more likely to be socioeconomically disadvantaged compared to white women. Almost 55 % of women gained an excessive amount of weight during pregnancy, and 2 % lost weight during pregnancy. Black women were more likely than white women to have inadequate weight gain or weight loss. Mid-high (aRR = 1.3, 95 % CI 1.2, 1.3) and high (aRR = 1.5, 95 % CI 1.5, 1.6) NSED compared to low NSED was associated with inadequate weight gain while NSED was not associated with excessive weight gain. Among black women, high versus low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy (RR = 1.6, 95 % CI 1.1, 2.5). Among white women, each level of NSED compared to low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy. This study demonstrates how neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics can contribute to our understanding of inadequate weight gain and weight loss during pregnancy, having implications for future research and interventions designed to advance pregnancy outcomes.
subject
0Gestational weight gain and loss
1Neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage
2Neighborhood conditions
3Racial differences
general
010.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
1English
2Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
3SpringerLink
sourceidspringer_jour
recordidspringer_jour10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
issn
01573-6628
115736628
21092-7875
310927875
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
addtitle
0Maternal and Child Health Journal
1Matern Child Health J
searchscopespringer_journals_complete
scopespringer_journals_complete
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, galeid, pages]
sort
titleNeighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Gestational Weight Gain and Loss
authorMendez, Dara ; Doebler, Donna ; Kim, Kevin ; Amutah, Ndidi ; Fabio, Anthony ; Bodnar, Lisa
creationdate20140700
facets
frbrgroupid2165540085025466637
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2014
topic
0Gestational Weight Gain And Loss
1Neighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage
2Neighborhood Conditions
3Racial Differences
collectionSpringerLink
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Mendez, Dara
1Doebler, Donna
2Kim, Kevin
3Amutah, Ndidi
4Fabio, Anthony
5Bodnar, Lisa
jtitleMaternal And Child Health Journal
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Mendez
1Doebler
2Kim
3Amutah
4Fabio
5Bodnar
aufirst
0Dara
1D.
2Donna
3Almario
4Kevin
5H.
6Ndidi
7N.
8Anthony
9Lisa
10M.
au
0Mendez, Dara
1Doebler, Donna
2Kim, Kevin
3Amutah, Ndidi
4Fabio, Anthony
5Bodnar, Lisa
atitleNeighborhood Socioeconomic Disadvantage and Gestational Weight Gain and Loss
jtitleMaternal and Child Health Journal
stitleMatern Child Health J
risdate201407
volume18
issue5
spage1095
epage1103
issn1092-7875
eissn1573-6628
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractWe explored the relationship between neighborhood socioeconomic disadvantage (NSED) and gestational weight gain and loss and if the association differed by race. A census tract level NSED index (categorized as low, mid-low, mid-high, and high) was generated from 12 measures from the 2000 US Census data. Gestational weight gain and other individual-level characteristics were derived from vital birth records for Allegheny County, PA for 2003–2010 (n = 55,608). Crude and adjusted relative risks were estimated using modified multilevel Poisson regression models to estimate the association between NSED and excessive and inadequate gestational weight gain (GWG) and weight loss (versus adequate GWG). Black women lived in neighborhoods that were more likely to be socioeconomically disadvantaged compared to white women. Almost 55 % of women gained an excessive amount of weight during pregnancy, and 2 % lost weight during pregnancy. Black women were more likely than white women to have inadequate weight gain or weight loss. Mid-high (aRR = 1.3, 95 % CI 1.2, 1.3) and high (aRR = 1.5, 95 % CI 1.5, 1.6) NSED compared to low NSED was associated with inadequate weight gain while NSED was not associated with excessive weight gain. Among black women, high versus low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy (RR = 1.6, 95 % CI 1.1, 2.5). Among white women, each level of NSED compared to low NSED was associated with weight loss during pregnancy. This study demonstrates how neighborhood socioeconomic characteristics can contribute to our understanding of inadequate weight gain and weight loss during pregnancy, having implications for future research and interventions designed to advance pregnancy outcomes.
copBoston
pubSpringer US
doi10.1007/s10995-013-1339-1
pages1095-1103
date2014-07