schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Treating minorities with fatwas: a study of the Ahmadiyya community in Indonesia

The term “minority religious community” in the Muslim country of Indonesia refers not only to those embracing religions other than Islam, but also to minority groups like the Ahmadiyya. Recently, the treatment of Ahmadis has been worse than the treatment of non-Muslims. This article, therefore, inte... Full description

Journal Title: Contemporary Islam 2014, Vol.8(3), pp.285-301
Main Author: Burhani, Ahmad
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 1872-0218 ; E-ISSN: 1872-0226 ; DOI: 10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
title: Treating minorities with fatwas: a study of the Ahmadiyya community in Indonesia
format: Article
creator:
  • Burhani, Ahmad
subjects:
  • Ahmadiyya
  • Orthodoxy-orthopraxy
  • Apostasy
  • Religious minority
  • Fatwa
  • Ideological persuasion
ispartof: Contemporary Islam, 2014, Vol.8(3), pp.285-301
description: The term “minority religious community” in the Muslim country of Indonesia refers not only to those embracing religions other than Islam, but also to minority groups like the Ahmadiyya. Recently, the treatment of Ahmadis has been worse than the treatment of non-Muslims. This article, therefore, intends to study the status of ‘deviant’ groups under Islamic law and the treatment of them in Muslim society. Specifically, this article addresses the following questions: How did ulama in the past define and treat minority groups? How do contemporary Sunni ulama define and treat the Ahmadiyya? What is the status of this group under Islamic law? Are they apostates, heretics, or unbelievers? And what are the legal consequences of these charges? To answer these questions, this article employs two methods. First, for theoretical treatment of minority groups in the past, this article focuses its analysis on al-Ghazāli’s Fayṣal al-tafriqa and Faḍā ’ iḥ al-bāṭiniyya . Second, following a discussion of classical Islam, the article moves to contemporary time by analyzing fatwas against the Ahmadiyya from five institutions: the Rābiṭa al-‘Ᾱlam al-Islāmī , Majelis Ulama Indonesia (MUI), Muhammadiyah, Council of the Islamic Fiqh Academy of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and Nahdlatul Ulama (NU). This article argues that, first, fatwas against the Ahmadiyya issued by these institutions were intended as a device to sustain orthodoxy of umma and, second, orthopraxy or devoutness in observing religious rituals, as practiced by the Ahmadis, does not exempt them from the charge of apostasy because theologically they are believed to deviate from orthodox beliefs.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1872-0218 ; E-ISSN: 1872-0226 ; DOI: 10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1872-0226
  • 18720226
  • 1872-0218
  • 18720218
url: Link


@attributes
ID968596295
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
sourceidspringer_jour
recordidTN_springer_jour10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
sourcesystemOther
pqid1550070481
galeid376768399
display
typearticle
titleTreating minorities with fatwas: a study of the Ahmadiyya community in Indonesia
creatorBurhani, Ahmad
ispartofContemporary Islam, 2014, Vol.8(3), pp.285-301
identifier
subjectAhmadiyya ; Orthodoxy-orthopraxy ; Apostasy ; Religious minority ; Fatwa ; Ideological persuasion
descriptionThe term “minority religious community” in the Muslim country of Indonesia refers not only to those embracing religions other than Islam, but also to minority groups like the Ahmadiyya. Recently, the treatment of Ahmadis has been worse than the treatment of non-Muslims. This article, therefore, intends to study the status of ‘deviant’ groups under Islamic law and the treatment of them in Muslim society. Specifically, this article addresses the following questions: How did ulama in the past define and treat minority groups? How do contemporary Sunni ulama define and treat the Ahmadiyya? What is the status of this group under Islamic law? Are they apostates, heretics, or unbelievers? And what are the legal consequences of these charges? To answer these questions, this article employs two methods. First, for theoretical treatment of minority groups in the past, this article focuses its analysis on al-Ghazāli’s Fayṣal al-tafriqa and Faḍā ’ iḥ al-bāṭiniyya . Second, following a discussion of classical Islam, the article moves to contemporary time by analyzing fatwas against the Ahmadiyya from five institutions: the Rābiṭa al-‘Ᾱlam al-Islāmī , Majelis Ulama Indonesia (MUI), Muhammadiyah, Council of the Islamic Fiqh Academy of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and Nahdlatul Ulama (NU). This article argues that, first, fatwas against the Ahmadiyya issued by these institutions were intended as a device to sustain orthodoxy of umma and, second, orthopraxy or devoutness in observing religious rituals, as practiced by the Ahmadis, does not exempt them from the charge of apostasy because theologically they are believed to deviate from orthodox beliefs.
languageeng
source
version4
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3$$EView_full_text_in_Springer_(Subscribers_only)
search
creatorcontribBurhani, Ahmad, Najib
titleTreating minorities with fatwas: a study of the Ahmadiyya community in Indonesia
descriptionThe term “minority religious community” in the Muslim country of Indonesia refers not only to those embracing religions other than Islam, but also to minority groups like the Ahmadiyya. Recently, the treatment of Ahmadis has been worse than the treatment of non-Muslims. This article, therefore, intends to study the status of ‘deviant’ groups under Islamic law and the treatment of them in Muslim society. Specifically, this article addresses the following questions: How did ulama in the past define and treat minority groups? How do contemporary Sunni ulama define and treat the Ahmadiyya? What is the status of this group under Islamic law? Are they apostates, heretics, or unbelievers? And what are the legal consequences of these charges? To answer these questions, this article employs two methods. First, for theoretical treatment of minority groups in the past, this article focuses its analysis on al-Ghazāli’s Fayṣal al-tafriqa and Faḍā ’ iḥ al-bāṭiniyya . Second, following a discussion of classical Islam, the article moves to contemporary time by analyzing fatwas against the Ahmadiyya from five institutions: the Rābiṭa al-‘Ᾱlam al-Islāmī , Majelis Ulama Indonesia (MUI), Muhammadiyah, Council of the Islamic Fiqh Academy of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and Nahdlatul Ulama (NU). This article argues that, first, fatwas against the Ahmadiyya issued by these institutions were intended as a device to sustain orthodoxy of umma and, second, orthopraxy or devoutness in observing religious rituals, as practiced by the Ahmadis, does not exempt them from the charge of apostasy because theologically they are believed to deviate from orthodox beliefs.
subject
0Ahmadiyya
1Orthodoxy-orthopraxy
2Apostasy
3Religious minority
4Fatwa
5Ideological persuasion
general
010.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
1English
2Springer Science & Business Media B.V.
3SpringerLink
sourceidspringer_jour
recordidspringer_jour10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
issn
01872-0226
118720226
21872-0218
318720218
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
addtitle
0Contemporary Islam
1Dynamics of Muslim Life
2Cont Islam
searchscopespringer_journals_complete
scopespringer_journals_complete
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pages, pqid, galeid]
sort
titleTreating minorities with fatwas: a study of the Ahmadiyya community in Indonesia
authorBurhani, Ahmad
creationdate20140900
facets
frbrgroupid2644714675608084079
frbrtype5
languageeng
creationdate2014
topic
0Ahmadiyya
1Orthodoxy-Orthopraxy
2Apostasy
3Religious Minority
4Fatwa
5Ideological Persuasion
collectionSpringerLink
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontribBurhani, Ahmad
jtitleContemporary Islam
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulastBurhani
aufirst
0Ahmad
1Najib
auBurhani, Ahmad
atitleTreating minorities with fatwas: a study of the Ahmadiyya community in Indonesia
jtitleContemporary Islam
stitleCont Islam
addtitleDynamics of Muslim Life
risdate201409
volume8
issue3
spage285
epage301
issn1872-0218
eissn1872-0226
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThe term “minority religious community” in the Muslim country of Indonesia refers not only to those embracing religions other than Islam, but also to minority groups like the Ahmadiyya. Recently, the treatment of Ahmadis has been worse than the treatment of non-Muslims. This article, therefore, intends to study the status of ‘deviant’ groups under Islamic law and the treatment of them in Muslim society. Specifically, this article addresses the following questions: How did ulama in the past define and treat minority groups? How do contemporary Sunni ulama define and treat the Ahmadiyya? What is the status of this group under Islamic law? Are they apostates, heretics, or unbelievers? And what are the legal consequences of these charges? To answer these questions, this article employs two methods. First, for theoretical treatment of minority groups in the past, this article focuses its analysis on al-Ghazāli’s Fayṣal al-tafriqa and Faḍā ’ iḥ al-bāṭiniyya . Second, following a discussion of classical Islam, the article moves to contemporary time by analyzing fatwas against the Ahmadiyya from five institutions: the Rābiṭa al-‘Ᾱlam al-Islāmī , Majelis Ulama Indonesia (MUI), Muhammadiyah, Council of the Islamic Fiqh Academy of the Organization of Islamic Cooperation (OIC), and Nahdlatul Ulama (NU). This article argues that, first, fatwas against the Ahmadiyya issued by these institutions were intended as a device to sustain orthodoxy of umma and, second, orthopraxy or devoutness in observing religious rituals, as practiced by the Ahmadis, does not exempt them from the charge of apostasy because theologically they are believed to deviate from orthodox beliefs.
copDordrecht
pubSpringer Netherlands
doi10.1007/s11562-013-0278-3
pages285-301
date2014-09