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Disparities in Treatment Uptake and Outcomes of Patients with Obesity in the USA

There are clear and persistent disparities in obesity prevalence within the USA. Some of these disparities fall along racial/ethnic lines; however, there are a number of other social and demographic constructs where obesity disparities are present. In addition to differing rates of obesity across gr... Full description

Journal Title: Current Obesity Reports 2016, Vol.5(2), pp.282-290
Main Author: Lewis, Kristina
Other Authors: Edwards-Hampton, Shenelle , Ard, Jamy
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: E-ISSN: 2162-4968 ; DOI: 10.1007/s13679-016-0211-1
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/s13679-016-0211-1
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s13679-016-0211-1
title: Disparities in Treatment Uptake and Outcomes of Patients with Obesity in the USA
format: Article
creator:
  • Lewis, Kristina
  • Edwards-Hampton, Shenelle
  • Ard, Jamy
subjects:
  • Obesity
  • Disparities
  • Obesity prevalence
  • Race
  • Ethnicity
  • African American
  • Bariatric surgery
  • Lifestyle modification
  • Anti-obesity pharmacotherapy
  • Behavioral intervention
  • Genetic admixture
  • Culture
  • Treatment access
  • Treatment adherence
ispartof: Current Obesity Reports, 2016, Vol.5(2), pp.282-290
description: There are clear and persistent disparities in obesity prevalence within the USA. Some of these disparities fall along racial/ethnic lines; however, there are a number of other social and demographic constructs where obesity disparities are present. In addition to differing rates of obesity across groups, there is growing evidence that subgroups of patients both seek out and respond to obesity treatment differently. This review article explores the epidemiology of obesity disparities, as well as the existing evidence around how different groups may respond to behavioral, medical, and surgical therapies, and potential reasons for differential uptake and response, from culture, to access, to physiology. We find that the vast majority of evidence in this area has focused on the observation that African Americans tend to lose less weight in clinical trials compared to non-Hispanic whites and mainly pertains to behavioral interventions. Moving forward, there will be a need for studies that broaden the notion of health disparity beyond just comparing African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, a more thorough examination of the potential for disparate outcomes after medical and surgical treatments of obesity is needed, coupled with the careful study of possible physiologic drivers of differential treatment response.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 2162-4968 ; DOI: 10.1007/s13679-016-0211-1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2162-4968
  • 21624968
url: Link


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identifierE-ISSN: 2162-4968 ; DOI: 10.1007/s13679-016-0211-1
subjectObesity ; Disparities ; Obesity prevalence ; Race ; Ethnicity ; African American ; Bariatric surgery ; Lifestyle modification ; Anti-obesity pharmacotherapy ; Behavioral intervention ; Genetic admixture ; Culture ; Treatment access ; Treatment adherence
descriptionThere are clear and persistent disparities in obesity prevalence within the USA. Some of these disparities fall along racial/ethnic lines; however, there are a number of other social and demographic constructs where obesity disparities are present. In addition to differing rates of obesity across groups, there is growing evidence that subgroups of patients both seek out and respond to obesity treatment differently. This review article explores the epidemiology of obesity disparities, as well as the existing evidence around how different groups may respond to behavioral, medical, and surgical therapies, and potential reasons for differential uptake and response, from culture, to access, to physiology. We find that the vast majority of evidence in this area has focused on the observation that African Americans tend to lose less weight in clinical trials compared to non-Hispanic whites and mainly pertains to behavioral interventions. Moving forward, there will be a need for studies that broaden the notion of health disparity beyond just comparing African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, a more thorough examination of the potential for disparate outcomes after medical and surgical treatments of obesity is needed, coupled with the careful study of possible physiologic drivers of differential treatment response.
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abstractThere are clear and persistent disparities in obesity prevalence within the USA. Some of these disparities fall along racial/ethnic lines; however, there are a number of other social and demographic constructs where obesity disparities are present. In addition to differing rates of obesity across groups, there is growing evidence that subgroups of patients both seek out and respond to obesity treatment differently. This review article explores the epidemiology of obesity disparities, as well as the existing evidence around how different groups may respond to behavioral, medical, and surgical therapies, and potential reasons for differential uptake and response, from culture, to access, to physiology. We find that the vast majority of evidence in this area has focused on the observation that African Americans tend to lose less weight in clinical trials compared to non-Hispanic whites and mainly pertains to behavioral interventions. Moving forward, there will be a need for studies that broaden the notion of health disparity beyond just comparing African Americans and non-Hispanic whites. Additionally, a more thorough examination of the potential for disparate outcomes after medical and surgical treatments of obesity is needed, coupled with the careful study of possible physiologic drivers of differential treatment response.
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doi10.1007/s13679-016-0211-1
pages282-290
date2016-06