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International Tobacco Control

Tobacco use is one of the leading causes of preventable death globally with the burden falling predominantly on middle- and low-income countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) introduced the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) to reduce the health and economic burden posed by tobacc... Full description

Journal Title: Current Addiction Reports 2015, Vol.2(1), pp.1-7
Main Author: Dobbie, Fiona
Other Authors: Hitchman, Sara , McNeill, Ann , Bauld, Linda
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Tax
ID: E-ISSN: 2196-2952 ; DOI: 10.1007/s40429-015-0047-x
Zum Text:
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recordid: springer_jour10.1007/s40429-015-0047-x
title: International Tobacco Control
format: Article
creator:
  • Dobbie, Fiona
  • Hitchman, Sara
  • McNeill, Ann
  • Bauld, Linda
subjects:
  • Tobacco control
  • Tax
  • Smoke free
  • Plain packaging
ispartof: Current Addiction Reports, 2015, Vol.2(1), pp.1-7
description: Tobacco use is one of the leading causes of preventable death globally with the burden falling predominantly on middle- and low-income countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) introduced the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) to reduce the health and economic burden posed by tobacco. In this article, we assess the evidence behind three main measures included in the FCTC: (1) raising the price of tobacco, (2) introducing smoke-free policies and (3) standardised tobacco packaging. We discuss the evidence base for their introduction as well as evidence of the impact of implementation both in industrialised and developing countries, where data are available. A key challenge to the introduction of policies is opposition from the tobacco industry who has a history of challenging such developments. Another key challenge is the introduction of innovative policies which have not been introduced elsewhere, and there is consequentially not yet an evidence base in place. Finally, the advent of alternative nicotine delivery devices such as electronic cigarettes, and the role of the tobacco industry in their production, is posing new challenges for tobacco control.
language: eng
source:
identifier: E-ISSN: 2196-2952 ; DOI: 10.1007/s40429-015-0047-x
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 2196-2952
  • 21962952
url: Link


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subjectTobacco control ; Tax ; Smoke free ; Plain packaging
descriptionTobacco use is one of the leading causes of preventable death globally with the burden falling predominantly on middle- and low-income countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) introduced the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) to reduce the health and economic burden posed by tobacco. In this article, we assess the evidence behind three main measures included in the FCTC: (1) raising the price of tobacco, (2) introducing smoke-free policies and (3) standardised tobacco packaging. We discuss the evidence base for their introduction as well as evidence of the impact of implementation both in industrialised and developing countries, where data are available. A key challenge to the introduction of policies is opposition from the tobacco industry who has a history of challenging such developments. Another key challenge is the introduction of innovative policies which have not been introduced elsewhere, and there is consequentially not yet an evidence base in place. Finally, the advent of alternative nicotine delivery devices such as electronic cigarettes, and the role of the tobacco industry in their production, is posing new challenges for tobacco control.
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abstractTobacco use is one of the leading causes of preventable death globally with the burden falling predominantly on middle- and low-income countries. The World Health Organisation (WHO) introduced the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (FCTC) to reduce the health and economic burden posed by tobacco. In this article, we assess the evidence behind three main measures included in the FCTC: (1) raising the price of tobacco, (2) introducing smoke-free policies and (3) standardised tobacco packaging. We discuss the evidence base for their introduction as well as evidence of the impact of implementation both in industrialised and developing countries, where data are available. A key challenge to the introduction of policies is opposition from the tobacco industry who has a history of challenging such developments. Another key challenge is the introduction of innovative policies which have not been introduced elsewhere, and there is consequentially not yet an evidence base in place. Finally, the advent of alternative nicotine delivery devices such as electronic cigarettes, and the role of the tobacco industry in their production, is posing new challenges for tobacco control.
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