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Are free amino acids responsible for the `host factor' effects on symbiotic zooxanthellae in extracts of host tissue?

Symbiotic dinoflagellates (`zooxanthellae') typically release short-term photosynthetic products and have enhanced photosynthesis when exposed to extracts of host tissue. Published evidence has indicated that free amino acids (FAA) at concentrations exceeding 40 mM are responsible for these `host fa... Full description

Journal Title: Hydrobiologia 2001, Vol.461(1), pp.71-78
Main Author: Cook, Clayton
Other Authors: Davy, Simon
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
MAA
ID: ISSN: 0018-8158 ; E-ISSN: 1573-5117 ; DOI: 10.1023/A:1012785725378
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1023/A:1012785725378
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recordid: springer_jour1012785725378
title: Are free amino acids responsible for the `host factor' effects on symbiotic zooxanthellae in extracts of host tissue?
format: Article
creator:
  • Cook, Clayton
  • Davy, Simon
subjects:
  • sea anemone
  • zooxanthellae
  • free amino acids
  • MAA
  • coral
ispartof: Hydrobiologia, 2001, Vol.461(1), pp.71-78
description: Symbiotic dinoflagellates (`zooxanthellae') typically release short-term photosynthetic products and have enhanced photosynthesis when exposed to extracts of host tissue. Published evidence has indicated that free amino acids (FAA) at concentrations exceeding 40 mM are responsible for these `host factor' effects on zooxanthellae from sea anemones and corals. We have compared the ninhydrin-positive FAA concentrations of extracts of the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida with their efficacy in eliciting these responses and found little effect on carbon release by freshly isolated A. pallida symbionts at concentrations up to 0.6 mM, the highest concentration of our samples. Extracts of the coral Montastraea annularis induced release from these algae at less than 0.1 mM FAA, but there was no correlation between total ninhydrin-positive FAA concentration and `host factor' activity. However, all of these preparations stimulated photosynthesis. We tested a range of concentrations (≤50 mM) of glycine, alanine and glutamic acid with the isolated A. pallida symbionts. There was a significant increase in the release of fixed carbon with increasing alanine concentrations, but not with the other two amino acids. There were no effects on photosynthesis. Our observations support other reports indicating that other compounds , or specific amino acids such as taurine and the mycosporine-like amino acids, are responsible for `host factor' effects.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0018-8158 ; E-ISSN: 1573-5117 ; DOI: 10.1023/A:1012785725378
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1573-5117
  • 15735117
  • 0018-8158
  • 00188158
url: Link


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titleAre free amino acids responsible for the `host factor' effects on symbiotic zooxanthellae in extracts of host tissue?
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subjectsea anemone ; zooxanthellae ; free amino acids ; MAA ; coral
descriptionSymbiotic dinoflagellates (`zooxanthellae') typically release short-term photosynthetic products and have enhanced photosynthesis when exposed to extracts of host tissue. Published evidence has indicated that free amino acids (FAA) at concentrations exceeding 40 mM are responsible for these `host factor' effects on zooxanthellae from sea anemones and corals. We have compared the ninhydrin-positive FAA concentrations of extracts of the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida with their efficacy in eliciting these responses and found little effect on carbon release by freshly isolated A. pallida symbionts at concentrations up to 0.6 mM, the highest concentration of our samples. Extracts of the coral Montastraea annularis induced release from these algae at less than 0.1 mM FAA, but there was no correlation between total ninhydrin-positive FAA concentration and `host factor' activity. However, all of these preparations stimulated photosynthesis. We tested a range of concentrations (≤50 mM) of glycine, alanine and glutamic acid with the isolated A. pallida symbionts. There was a significant increase in the release of fixed carbon with increasing alanine concentrations, but not with the other two amino acids. There were no effects on photosynthesis. Our observations support other reports indicating that other compounds , or specific amino acids such as taurine and the mycosporine-like amino acids, are responsible for `host factor' effects.
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titleAre free amino acids responsible for the `host factor' effects on symbiotic zooxanthellae in extracts of host tissue?
descriptionSymbiotic dinoflagellates (`zooxanthellae') typically release short-term photosynthetic products and have enhanced photosynthesis when exposed to extracts of host tissue. Published evidence has indicated that free amino acids (FAA) at concentrations exceeding 40 mM are responsible for these `host factor' effects on zooxanthellae from sea anemones and corals. We have compared the ninhydrin-positive FAA concentrations of extracts of the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida with their efficacy in eliciting these responses and found little effect on carbon release by freshly isolated A. pallida symbionts at concentrations up to 0.6 mM, the highest concentration of our samples. Extracts of the coral Montastraea annularis induced release from these algae at less than 0.1 mM FAA, but there was no correlation between total ninhydrin-positive FAA concentration and `host factor' activity. However, all of these preparations stimulated photosynthesis. We tested a range of concentrations (≤50 mM) of glycine, alanine and glutamic acid with the isolated A. pallida symbionts. There was a significant increase in the release of fixed carbon with increasing alanine concentrations, but not with the other two amino acids. There were no effects on photosynthesis. Our observations support other reports indicating that other compounds , or specific amino acids such as taurine and the mycosporine-like amino acids, are responsible for `host factor' effects.
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abstractSymbiotic dinoflagellates (`zooxanthellae') typically release short-term photosynthetic products and have enhanced photosynthesis when exposed to extracts of host tissue. Published evidence has indicated that free amino acids (FAA) at concentrations exceeding 40 mM are responsible for these `host factor' effects on zooxanthellae from sea anemones and corals. We have compared the ninhydrin-positive FAA concentrations of extracts of the symbiotic sea anemone Aiptasia pallida with their efficacy in eliciting these responses and found little effect on carbon release by freshly isolated A. pallida symbionts at concentrations up to 0.6 mM, the highest concentration of our samples. Extracts of the coral Montastraea annularis induced release from these algae at less than 0.1 mM FAA, but there was no correlation between total ninhydrin-positive FAA concentration and `host factor' activity. However, all of these preparations stimulated photosynthesis. We tested a range of concentrations (≤50 mM) of glycine, alanine and glutamic acid with the isolated A. pallida symbionts. There was a significant increase in the release of fixed carbon with increasing alanine concentrations, but not with the other two amino acids. There were no effects on photosynthesis. Our observations support other reports indicating that other compounds , or specific amino acids such as taurine and the mycosporine-like amino acids, are responsible for `host factor' effects.
copDordrecht
pubKluwer Academic Publishers
doi10.1023/A:1012785725378
pages71-78
date2001-10-01