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Implementing and sustaining dietary change in the context of social relationships

To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00867.x Byline: Petra J. Ryden (1), Ylva Mattsson Sydner (1,2) Keywords: dietary change; social relationship; sustainability; barriers; qualitative interviews Abstract: Scand J Caring... Full description

Journal Title: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences 2011, Vol.25(3)
Main Author: Ryden, Petra J
Other Authors: Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0283-9318
Link: http://svemedplus.kib.ki.se/Default.aspx?Dok_ID=122333
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title: Implementing and sustaining dietary change in the context of social relationships
format: Article
creator:
  • Ryden, Petra J
  • Mattsson Sydner, Ylva
subjects:
  • Adult
  • Aged
  • Arthritis, Rheumatoid
  • Attitude to Health
  • Cooking
  • Family
  • Feeding Behavior
  • Female
  • Humans
  • Interpersonal Relations
  • Male
  • Middle Aged
  • Patient Compliance
  • Surveys and Questionnaires
  • Diet, Mediterranean
  • Social Participation
  • Vuxna
  • Äldre
  • Ledgångsreumatism
  • Attityder Till Hälsa
  • Matlagning
  • Familj
  • Ätbeteende
  • Kvinnlig
  • Människa
  • Personliga Relationer
  • Manlig
  • Medelålders Personer
  • Patientföljsamhet
  • Kartläggning Och Enkäter
  • Medelhavskost
  • Socialt Deltagande
ispartof: Scandinavian Journal of Caring Sciences, 2011, Vol.25(3)
description: To authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00867.x Byline: Petra J. Ryden (1), Ylva Mattsson Sydner (1,2) Keywords: dietary change; social relationship; sustainability; barriers; qualitative interviews Abstract: Scand J Caring Sci; 2011; 25; 583-590Implementing and sustaining dietary change in the context of social relationships Background: Changing to healthier dietary habits is quite difficult to implement and even more difficult to sustain. As the majority of people have some or all their meals with others, it is likely that their social relationships influence the dietary change process and its sustainability. Thus, the aim of this research was to explore and describe experiences of dietary change and its sustainability in the context of an individual's social relationships. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with fourteen individuals who had previously been participants in a 3-month dietary intervention study using a Mediterranean diet. Thematic analysis was used on verbatim transcripts of the interviews. Results: Social relationships were the main barrier to sustainability - in particular social relationships within the household where various coping strategies were needed on an everyday basis. Social relationships outside the household were also difficult to manage as dietary change challenged existing traditions and norms of what to eat. The changer was thereby forced to risk social disapproval or to deviate from the diet. Conclusions: Social relationships within and outside the household complicated the accomplishment of healthy dietary changes. Hence, it is important to acknowledge the social context of the changer when dietary change is to be implemented. Author Affiliation: (1)Department of Food and Nutrition, Umea University, Umea, Sweden (2)Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Article History: Submitted 1 June 2010, Accepted 12 November 2010 Article note: Petra J. Ryden, Department of Food and Nutrition, Umea University, S-90187, Umea, Sweden., E-mail: petra.ryden@kost.umu.se
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0283-9318
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0283-9318
  • 02839318
url: Link


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subjectAdult ; Aged ; Arthritis, Rheumatoid ; Attitude to Health ; Cooking ; Family ; Feeding Behavior ; Female ; Humans ; Interpersonal Relations ; Male ; Middle Aged ; Patient Compliance ; Surveys and Questionnaires ; Diet, Mediterranean ; Social Participation ; Vuxna ; Äldre ; Ledgångsreumatism ; Attityder Till Hälsa ; Matlagning ; Familj ; Ätbeteende ; Kvinnlig ; Människa ; Personliga Relationer ; Manlig ; Medelålders Personer ; Patientföljsamhet ; Kartläggning Och Enkäter ; Medelhavskost ; Socialt Deltagande
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descriptionTo authenticate to the full-text of this article, please visit this link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1471-6712.2010.00867.x Byline: Petra J. Ryden (1), Ylva Mattsson Sydner (1,2) Keywords: dietary change; social relationship; sustainability; barriers; qualitative interviews Abstract: Scand J Caring Sci; 2011; 25; 583-590Implementing and sustaining dietary change in the context of social relationships Background: Changing to healthier dietary habits is quite difficult to implement and even more difficult to sustain. As the majority of people have some or all their meals with others, it is likely that their social relationships influence the dietary change process and its sustainability. Thus, the aim of this research was to explore and describe experiences of dietary change and its sustainability in the context of an individual's social relationships. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with fourteen individuals who had previously been participants in a 3-month dietary intervention study using a Mediterranean diet. Thematic analysis was used on verbatim transcripts of the interviews. Results: Social relationships were the main barrier to sustainability - in particular social relationships within the household where various coping strategies were needed on an everyday basis. Social relationships outside the household were also difficult to manage as dietary change challenged existing traditions and norms of what to eat. The changer was thereby forced to risk social disapproval or to deviate from the diet. Conclusions: Social relationships within and outside the household complicated the accomplishment of healthy dietary changes. Hence, it is important to acknowledge the social context of the changer when dietary change is to be implemented. Author Affiliation: (1)Department of Food and Nutrition, Umea University, Umea, Sweden (2)Department of Food, Nutrition and Dietetics, Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden Article History: Submitted 1 June 2010, Accepted 12 November 2010 Article note: Petra J. Ryden, Department of Food and Nutrition, Umea University, S-90187, Umea, Sweden., E-mail: petra.ryden@kost.umu.se
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abstractBackground: Changing to healthier dietary habits is quite difficult to implement and even more difficult to sustain. As the majority of people have some or all their meals with others, it is likely that their social relationships influence the dietary change process and its sustainability. Thus, the aim of this research was to explore and describe experiences of dietary change and its sustainability in the context of an individual’s social relationships. Methods: Semi-structured interviews were conducted individually with fourteen individuals who had previously been participants in a 3-month dietary intervention study using a Mediterranean diet. Thematic analysis was used on verbatim transcripts of the interviews. Results: Social relationships were the main barrier to sustainability - in particular social relationships within the household where various coping strategies were needed on an everyday basis. Social relationships outside the household were also difficult to manage as dietary change challenged existing traditions and norms of what to eat. The changer was thereby forced to risk social disapproval or to deviate from the diet. Conclusions: Social relationships within and outside the household complicated the accomplishment of healthy dietary changes. Hence, it is important to acknowledge the social context of the changer when dietary change is to be implemented. Published by arrangement with John Wiley & Sons.
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