schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Survey of Recent Developments

Outgoing Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's second-term record is creditable, measured against the targets he set himself in 2010, but deficient in key areas: economic reform, infrastructure investment, and anti-corruption. Indonesia's 2009–14 parliament has been active in economic poli... Full description

Journal Title: Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies 04 May 2014, Vol.50(2), p.157-183
Main Author: Howes, Stephen
Other Authors: Davies, Robin
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: eng ; msa
Subjects:
D72
E62
O11
O53
Publisher: Routledge
ID: ISSN: 0007-4918 ; E-ISSN: 1472-7234 ; DOI: 10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: tayfranc10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
title: Survey of Recent Developments
format: Article
creator:
  • Howes, Stephen
  • Davies, Robin
subjects:
  • Fiscal Reform
  • Energy Subsidies
  • Economic Reform
  • Trade Policies
  • D72
  • E62
  • O11
  • O53
ispartof: Bulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, 04 May 2014, Vol.50(2), p.157-183
description: Outgoing Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's second-term record is creditable, measured against the targets he set himself in 2010, but deficient in key areas: economic reform, infrastructure investment, and anti-corruption. Indonesia's 2009–14 parliament has been active in economic policymaking, and will leave as its legacy a raft of protectionist legislation. Both presidential candidates, Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo and Prabowo Subianto, have appealed to nationalism in their campaigns, calling for Indonesia to assert its sovereignty and increase its self-sufficiency, but Jokowi's economic platform is more moderate and economically literate than Prabowo's. The incoming president will inherit an economy that continues to slow. Growth is now not expected to approach 6% until 2015 at the earliest. Having engineered a reduction in the current account deficit, Indonesian policymakers now face the more difficult problem of structural fiscal adjustment. Energy subsidies are the most immediate problem, but fiscal reform more generally will emerge as an overriding and unpleasant imperative for whoever wins the presidential election on 9 July. Unless difficult fiscal policy measures are taken, Indonesia will face major trade-offs between deficit control and investment in social programs and economic infrastructure. The new president will struggle to restrict the deficit to the cap of 3% of GDP: a balanced budget will likely not be feasible for several years. He will need to increase the ratio of revenue to GDP and eliminate fuel subsidies—through a more systematic approach than the infrequent price increases of the past. He will need to choose carefully between competing expenditure priorities, such as infrastructure and defence. The new president would also be well advised to tread cautiously in implementing the legal mandates he will inherit, and to work with parliament to avoid further and unwind current earmarking of public expenditure.
language: eng ; msa
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0007-4918 ; E-ISSN: 1472-7234 ; DOI: 10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0007-4918
  • 00074918
  • 1472-7234
  • 14727234
url: Link


@attributes
ID1194846254
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
sourceidtayfranc
recordidTN_tayfranc10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
sourceformatXML
sourcesystemOther
pqid1554295901
display
typearticle
titleSurvey of Recent Developments
creatorHowes, Stephen ; Davies, Robin
publisherRoutledge
ispartofBulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies, 04 May 2014, Vol.50(2), p.157-183
identifier
subjectFiscal Reform ; Energy Subsidies ; Economic Reform ; Trade Policies ; D72 ; E62 ; O11 ; O53
descriptionOutgoing Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's second-term record is creditable, measured against the targets he set himself in 2010, but deficient in key areas: economic reform, infrastructure investment, and anti-corruption. Indonesia's 2009–14 parliament has been active in economic policymaking, and will leave as its legacy a raft of protectionist legislation. Both presidential candidates, Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo and Prabowo Subianto, have appealed to nationalism in their campaigns, calling for Indonesia to assert its sovereignty and increase its self-sufficiency, but Jokowi's economic platform is more moderate and economically literate than Prabowo's. The incoming president will inherit an economy that continues to slow. Growth is now not expected to approach 6% until 2015 at the earliest. Having engineered a reduction in the current account deficit, Indonesian policymakers now face the more difficult problem of structural fiscal adjustment. Energy subsidies are the most immediate problem, but fiscal reform more generally will emerge as an overriding and unpleasant imperative for whoever wins the presidential election on 9 July. Unless difficult fiscal policy measures are taken, Indonesia will face major trade-offs between deficit control and investment in social programs and economic infrastructure. The new president will struggle to restrict the deficit to the cap of 3% of GDP: a balanced budget will likely not be feasible for several years. He will need to increase the ratio of revenue to GDP and eliminate fuel subsidies—through a more systematic approach than the infrequent price increases of the past. He will need to choose carefully between competing expenditure priorities, such as infrastructure and defence. The new president would also be well advised to tread cautiously in implementing the legal mandates he will inherit, and to work with parliament to avoid further and unwind current earmarking of public expenditure.
languageeng ; msa
source
version4
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
addlink$$Uhttps://exlibris-pub.s3.amazonaws.com/aboutTaylorFrancis.html$$EView_Taylor_&_Francis_Group_Copyright_Statement
backlink$$Uhttp://dx.doi.org/10.1080/00074918.2014.938403$$EView_this_record_in_Taylor_&_Francis
search
creatorcontrib
0Howes, Stephen
1Davies, Robin
titleSurvey of Recent Developments
descriptionSUMMARY Outgoing Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's second-term record is creditable, measured against the targets he set himself in 2010, but deficient in key areas: economic reform, infrastructure investment, and anti-corruption. Indonesia's 2009–14 parliament has been active in economic policymaking, and will leave as its legacy a raft of protectionist legislation. Both presidential candidates, Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo and Prabowo Subianto, have appealed to nationalism in their campaigns, calling for Indonesia to assert its sovereignty and increase its self-sufficiency, but Jokowi's economic platform is more moderate and economically literate than Prabowo's. The incoming president will inherit an economy that continues to slow. Growth is now not expected to approach 6% until 2015 at the earliest. Having engineered a reduction in the current account deficit, Indonesian policymakers now face the more difficult problem of structural fiscal adjustment. Energy subsidies are the most immediate problem, but fiscal reform more generally will emerge as an overriding and unpleasant imperative for whoever wins the presidential election on 9 July. Unless difficult fiscal policy measures are taken, Indonesia will face major trade-offs between deficit control and investment in social programs and economic infrastructure. The new president will struggle to restrict the deficit to the cap of 3% of GDP: a balanced budget will likely not be feasible for several years. He will need to increase the ratio of revenue to GDP and eliminate fuel subsidies—through a more systematic approach than the infrequent price increases of the past. He will need to choose carefully between competing expenditure priorities, such as infrastructure and defence. The new president would also be well advised to tread cautiously in implementing the legal mandates he will inherit, and to work with parliament to avoid further and unwind current earmarking of public expenditure.
subject
0Fiscal Reform
1Energy Subsidies
2Economic Reform
3Trade Policies
4D72
5E62
6O11
7O53
general
010.1080/00074918.2014.938403
1Routledge
2Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group)
3Taylor & Francis Online - Journals
sourceidtayfranc
recordidtayfranc10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
issn
00007-4918
100074918
21472-7234
314727234
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2014
addtitleBulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies
searchscope
0tayfranc
1taylor_francis
scope
0tayfranc
1taylor_francis
citationpf 157 pt 183 vol 50 issue 2
startdate20140504
enddate20140504
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid]
sort
titleSurvey of Recent Developments
authorHowes, Stephen ; Davies, Robin
creationdate20140504
lso0120140504
facets
frbrgroupid9133527253212204702
frbrtype5
language
0eng
1msa
creationdate2014
topic
0Fiscal Reform
1Energy Subsidies
2Economic Reform
3Trade Policies
4D72
5E62
6O11
7O53
collectionTaylor & Francis Online - Journals
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Howes, Stephen
1Davies, Robin
jtitleBulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Howes
1Davies
aufirst
0Stephen
1Robin
au
0Howes, Stephen
1Davies, Robin
atitleSurvey of Recent Developments
jtitleBulletin of Indonesian Economic Studies
risdate20140504
volume50
issue2
spage157
epage183
pages157-183
issn0007-4918
eissn1472-7234
formatjournal
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractSUMMARY Outgoing Indonesian president Susilo Bambang Yudhoyono's second-term record is creditable, measured against the targets he set himself in 2010, but deficient in key areas: economic reform, infrastructure investment, and anti-corruption. Indonesia's 2009–14 parliament has been active in economic policymaking, and will leave as its legacy a raft of protectionist legislation. Both presidential candidates, Joko ‘Jokowi’ Widodo and Prabowo Subianto, have appealed to nationalism in their campaigns, calling for Indonesia to assert its sovereignty and increase its self-sufficiency, but Jokowi's economic platform is more moderate and economically literate than Prabowo's. The incoming president will inherit an economy that continues to slow. Growth is now not expected to approach 6% until 2015 at the earliest. Having engineered a reduction in the current account deficit, Indonesian policymakers now face the more difficult problem of structural fiscal adjustment. Energy subsidies are the most immediate problem, but fiscal reform more generally will emerge as an overriding and unpleasant imperative for whoever wins the presidential election on 9 July. Unless difficult fiscal policy measures are taken, Indonesia will face major trade-offs between deficit control and investment in social programs and economic infrastructure. The new president will struggle to restrict the deficit to the cap of 3% of GDP: a balanced budget will likely not be feasible for several years. He will need to increase the ratio of revenue to GDP and eliminate fuel subsidies—through a more systematic approach than the infrequent price increases of the past. He will need to choose carefully between competing expenditure priorities, such as infrastructure and defence. The new president would also be well advised to tread cautiously in implementing the legal mandates he will inherit, and to work with parliament to avoid further and unwind current earmarking of public expenditure.
pubRoutledge
doi10.1080/00074918.2014.938403
date2014-05-04