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Returning to the Religion of Abraham: Controversies over the Gafatar Movement in Contemporary Indonesia

This article explores the idea of ‘Milah Abraham’, a term used and advocated by Ahmad Mushaddeq and Mahful Muis, the founders of Gafatar ( Gerakan Fajar Nusantara /Archipelagic Dawn Movement). Mahful Muis, a prominent companion of Mushaddeq, has written many works about the idea of the religion of A... Full description

Journal Title: Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations 02 January 2019, Vol.30(1), p.87-104
Main Author: Makin, Al
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group)
Publisher: Routledge
ID: ISSN: 0959-6410 ; E-ISSN: 1469-9311 ; DOI: 10.1080/09596410.2019.1570425
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/09596410.2019.1570425
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recordid: tayfranc10.1080/09596410.2019.1570425
title: Returning to the Religion of Abraham: Controversies over the Gafatar Movement in Contemporary Indonesia
format: Article
creator:
  • Makin, Al
subjects:
  • Article
  • New Religious Movement
  • Pluralism
  • Religion Of Abraham
  • Ahmad Mushaddeq
  • Gafatar
  • Mahful Muis
  • Islam In Indonesia
ispartof: Islam and Christian–Muslim Relations, 02 January 2019, Vol.30(1), p.87-104
description: This article explores the idea of ‘Milah Abraham’, a term used and advocated by Ahmad Mushaddeq and Mahful Muis, the founders of Gafatar ( Gerakan Fajar Nusantara /Archipelagic Dawn Movement). Mahful Muis, a prominent companion of Mushaddeq, has written many works about the idea of the religion of Abraham. This article answers the questions of how the idea of Milah Abraham emerged, and what are the implications of its emergence in the context of plural Indonesian Islam. Based on interviews and the written works of both Gafatar leaders, this study explores the idea of the religion of Abraham and how it can go beyond Judaism, Christianity and Islam to a new spirituality that combines the three religious traditions. The idea of Milah Abraham not only offers a new syncretism in the context of plural Indonesian Islam, but also challenges the establishment of Islamic orthodoxy in the country. Since the 1970s, the idea of returning to the religion of Abraham has contributed to the discussion of pluralism among many Indonesian Muslim intellectuals.
language: eng
source: Routledge (Taylor & Francis Group)
identifier: ISSN: 0959-6410 ; E-ISSN: 1469-9311 ; DOI: 10.1080/09596410.2019.1570425
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0959-6410
  • 09596410
  • 1469-9311
  • 14699311
url: Link


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descriptionThis article explores the idea of ‘Milah Abraham’, a term used and advocated by Ahmad Mushaddeq and Mahful Muis, the founders of Gafatar ( Gerakan Fajar Nusantara /Archipelagic Dawn Movement). Mahful Muis, a prominent companion of Mushaddeq, has written many works about the idea of the religion of Abraham. This article answers the questions of how the idea of Milah Abraham emerged, and what are the implications of its emergence in the context of plural Indonesian Islam. Based on interviews and the written works of both Gafatar leaders, this study explores the idea of the religion of Abraham and how it can go beyond Judaism, Christianity and Islam to a new spirituality that combines the three religious traditions. The idea of Milah Abraham not only offers a new syncretism in the context of plural Indonesian Islam, but also challenges the establishment of Islamic orthodoxy in the country. Since the 1970s, the idea of returning to the religion of Abraham has contributed to the discussion of pluralism among many Indonesian Muslim intellectuals.
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abstractABSTRACTGerakan Fajar Nusantara This article explores the idea of ‘Milah Abraham’, a term used and advocated by Ahmad Mushaddeq and Mahful Muis, the founders of Gafatar ( Gerakan Fajar Nusantara /Archipelagic Dawn Movement). Mahful Muis, a prominent companion of Mushaddeq, has written many works about the idea of the religion of Abraham. This article answers the questions of how the idea of Milah Abraham emerged, and what are the implications of its emergence in the context of plural Indonesian Islam. Based on interviews and the written works of both Gafatar leaders, this study explores the idea of the religion of Abraham and how it can go beyond Judaism, Christianity and Islam to a new spirituality that combines the three religious traditions. The idea of Milah Abraham not only offers a new syncretism in the context of plural Indonesian Islam, but also challenges the establishment of Islamic orthodoxy in the country. Since the 1970s, the idea of returning to the religion of Abraham has contributed to the discussion of pluralism among many Indonesian Muslim intellectuals.
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