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VIGILANTISM AND VIOLENCE IN DECENTRALIZED INDONESIA: The Case of Lombok

This article examines the variable powers, positions, and legitimacy of informal authorities in Lombok, Indonesia, most notably tuan guru (Muslim clerics) and their affiliate pamswakarsa (vigilante forces). It argues that recent accounts of tuan guru as peacemakers downplay the complex structural fa... Full description

Journal Title: Critical Asian Studies 01 June 2013, Vol.45(2), p.201-230
Main Author: Tyson, Adam
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Routledge
ID: ISSN: 1467-2715 ; E-ISSN: 1472-6033 ; DOI: 10.1080/14672715.2013.792570
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/14672715.2013.792570
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recordid: tayfranc10.1080/14672715.2013.792570
title: VIGILANTISM AND VIOLENCE IN DECENTRALIZED INDONESIA: The Case of Lombok
format: Article
creator:
  • Tyson, Adam
subjects:
  • Violence
  • Economic Development
  • Religious Leaders
  • Muslims
  • Charismatic Leaders
  • Decentralization
  • Indonesia
  • Political Science
ispartof: Critical Asian Studies, 01 June 2013, Vol.45(2), p.201-230
description: This article examines the variable powers, positions, and legitimacy of informal authorities in Lombok, Indonesia, most notably tuan guru (Muslim clerics) and their affiliate pamswakarsa (vigilante forces). It argues that recent accounts of tuan guru as peacemakers downplay the complex structural factors that enable outbreaks of ethno-religious violence in the first place. By analyzing successive permutations of disorder, traceable back to the colonial era, this article helps locate and give context to the current policing and political dilemmas surrounding vigilantism in Indonesia. It then demonstrates how, in the era of decentralization, local and provincial authorities endeavor to domesticate pamswakarsa groups and their charismatic leaders. Finally, this article concludes that renewed spiritual expansionism, such as the renovation of Hindu temple sanctuaries in Lombok, elicits extreme responses from tuan guru. These responses provide renewed impetus for vigilante violence, strain interisland relations, and, at times, stifle economic development.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1467-2715 ; E-ISSN: 1472-6033 ; DOI: 10.1080/14672715.2013.792570
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1467-2715
  • 14672715
  • 1472-6033
  • 14726033
url: Link


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titleVIGILANTISM AND VIOLENCE IN DECENTRALIZED INDONESIA: The Case of Lombok
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identifier
descriptionThis article examines the variable powers, positions, and legitimacy of informal authorities in Lombok, Indonesia, most notably tuan guru (Muslim clerics) and their affiliate pamswakarsa (vigilante forces). It argues that recent accounts of tuan guru as peacemakers downplay the complex structural factors that enable outbreaks of ethno-religious violence in the first place. By analyzing successive permutations of disorder, traceable back to the colonial era, this article helps locate and give context to the current policing and political dilemmas surrounding vigilantism in Indonesia. It then demonstrates how, in the era of decentralization, local and provincial authorities endeavor to domesticate pamswakarsa groups and their charismatic leaders. Finally, this article concludes that renewed spiritual expansionism, such as the renovation of Hindu temple sanctuaries in Lombok, elicits extreme responses from tuan guru. These responses provide renewed impetus for vigilante violence, strain interisland relations, and, at times, stifle economic development.
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abstracttuan gurupamswakarsa This article examines the variable powers, positions, and legitimacy of informal authorities in Lombok, Indonesia, most notably tuan guru (Muslim clerics) and their affiliate pamswakarsa (vigilante forces). It argues that recent accounts of tuan guru as peacemakers downplay the complex structural factors that enable outbreaks of ethno-religious violence in the first place. By analyzing successive permutations of disorder, traceable back to the colonial era, this article helps locate and give context to the current policing and political dilemmas surrounding vigilantism in Indonesia. It then demonstrates how, in the era of decentralization, local and provincial authorities endeavor to domesticate pamswakarsa groups and their charismatic leaders. Finally, this article concludes that renewed spiritual expansionism, such as the renovation of Hindu temple sanctuaries in Lombok, elicits extreme responses from tuan guru. These responses provide renewed impetus for vigilante violence, strain interisland relations, and, at times, stifle economic development.
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