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WHAT'S IN A TWEET?: Foreign correspondents' use of social media

Given the ongoing debate about foreign correspondence being an endangered species and the foreign news hole shrinking ever more, this study explores how foreign correspondents at major US networks and print outlets use Twitter to break news, promote their work and their news organization, and commun... Full description

Journal Title: Journalism Practice 01 January 2012, p.1-14
Main Author: Cozma, Raluca
Other Authors: Chen, Kuan-Ju
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Publisher: Taylor & Francis Group
ID: ISSN: 1751-2786 ; E-ISSN: 1751-2794 ; DOI: 10.1080/17512786.2012.683340
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1080/17512786.2012.683340
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recordid: tayfranc10.1080/17512786.2012.683340
title: WHAT'S IN A TWEET?: Foreign correspondents' use of social media
format: Article
creator:
  • Cozma, Raluca
  • Chen, Kuan-Ju
subjects:
  • Content Analysis
  • Foreign Correspondence
  • Social Media
  • Twitter
  • Uses And Gratifications
ispartof: Journalism Practice, 01 January 2012, p.1-14
description: Given the ongoing debate about foreign correspondence being an endangered species and the foreign news hole shrinking ever more, this study explores how foreign correspondents at major US networks and print outlets use Twitter to break news, promote their work and their news organization, and communicate with their audiences. Findings show that correspondents use Twitter mainly to discuss current events where they are stationed or elsewhere and to promote their news outlet rather than to break news. Broadcast correspondents are more likely to break news, while print correspondents tend to share their opinion and link to other news outlets in their tweets more. While broadcast and print correspondents are equally active on Twitter, the broadcast ones are more popular. Popularity on Twitter is predicted by how long the correspondents have been on the platform and by use of Twitter-specific features like hashtags. The two genders were proportionately represented on Twitter, and no significant differences were found between male and female correspondents on any of the variables under investigation. Many correspondents are still ditching their profiles, setting it to private, or not providing helpful information in their Twitter biographies. Article ahead-of-print.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 1751-2786 ; E-ISSN: 1751-2794 ; DOI: 10.1080/17512786.2012.683340
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 1751-2786
  • 17512786
  • 1751-2794
  • 17512794
url: Link


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descriptionGiven the ongoing debate about foreign correspondence being an endangered species and the foreign news hole shrinking ever more, this study explores how foreign correspondents at major US networks and print outlets use Twitter to break news, promote their work and their news organization, and communicate with their audiences. Findings show that correspondents use Twitter mainly to discuss current events where they are stationed or elsewhere and to promote their news outlet rather than to break news. Broadcast correspondents are more likely to break news, while print correspondents tend to share their opinion and link to other news outlets in their tweets more. While broadcast and print correspondents are equally active on Twitter, the broadcast ones are more popular. Popularity on Twitter is predicted by how long the correspondents have been on the platform and by use of Twitter-specific features like hashtags. The two genders were proportionately represented on Twitter, and no significant differences were found between male and female correspondents on any of the variables under investigation. Many correspondents are still ditching their profiles, setting it to private, or not providing helpful information in their Twitter biographies. Article ahead-of-print.
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abstractGiven the ongoing debate about foreign correspondence being an endangered species and the foreign news hole shrinking ever more, this study explores how foreign correspondents at major US networks and print outlets use Twitter to break news, promote their work and their news organization, and communicate with their audiences. Findings show that correspondents use Twitter mainly to discuss current events where they are stationed or elsewhere and to promote their news outlet rather than to break news. Broadcast correspondents are more likely to break news, while print correspondents tend to share their opinion and link to other news outlets in their tweets more. While broadcast and print correspondents are equally active on Twitter, the broadcast ones are more popular. Popularity on Twitter is predicted by how long the correspondents have been on the platform and by use of Twitter-specific features like hashtags. The two genders were proportionately represented on Twitter, and no significant differences were found between male and female correspondents on any of the variables under investigation. Many correspondents are still ditching their profiles, setting it to private, or not providing helpful information in their Twitter biographies.
pubTaylor & Francis Group
doi10.1080/17512786.2012.683340
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date2012-01-01