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Nondestructive, serial in vivo imaging of a tissue-flap using a tissue adhesion barrier: Applications for IVM imaging in the mammary fat pad and lymph node

Intravital Microscopy (IVM) is a powerful tool for imaging of dynamic events in living subjects and benefits from flexibility of various tissue preparation techniques. For example, a “tissue flap” (TF) approach initially affords high spatial resolution and physiological imaging with minimal tissue p... Full description

Journal Title: IntraVital 01 July 2012, Vol.1(1), p.69-76
Main Author: Kotsuma, Masakatsu
Other Authors: Parashurama, Natesh , Smith, Bryan R. , Wo, Jonathan , Ito, Ken , Gambhir, Sanjiv S.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
Quelle: Taylor & Francis Group
Publisher: Taylor & Francis
ID: E-ISSN: 2165-9087 ; DOI: 10.4161/intv.21769
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recordid: tayfranc10.4161/intv.21769
title: Nondestructive, serial in vivo imaging of a tissue-flap using a tissue adhesion barrier: Applications for IVM imaging in the mammary fat pad and lymph node
format: Article
creator:
  • Kotsuma, Masakatsu
  • Parashurama, Natesh
  • Smith, Bryan R.
  • Wo, Jonathan
  • Ito, Ken
  • Gambhir, Sanjiv S.
subjects:
  • Research Article
  • Ntravital Microscopy
  • In Vivo Imaging
  • Lymphoma Imaging
  • Mammary Gland Imaging
  • Sequential Imaging
  • Tissue Adhesion Barrier
ispartof: IntraVital, 01 July 2012, Vol.1(1), p.69-76
description: Intravital Microscopy (IVM) is a powerful tool for imaging of dynamic events in living subjects and benefits from flexibility of various tissue preparation techniques. For example, a “tissue flap” (TF) approach initially affords high spatial resolution and physiological imaging with minimal tissue preparation, but serial TF imaging greatly increases the effects of pathological inflammation, resulting in postoperative adhesions and tissue injury. We took a materials science approach by implanting a commercially available, thin film, biopolymer tissue adhesion barrier (TAB) beneath the TF during serial imaging of the normal and developing breast in transgenic fluorescent mice, and with a fluorescent orthotopic mouse lymphoma model. We applied the TAB post-operatively beneath the TF to isolate the TF from the underlying peritoneum. When re-imaging the TF every 3–4 d, with a new TAB placed each time, we observed reduced hemorrhage, fibrous connective tissue and soft tissue damage. The presence of the TAB enabled sequential imaging of orthopically located EGFP + -lymphoma cells and associated vasculature at short intervals. In particular, it enabled visualization and tracking of the same individual fluorescent branches of the mammary gland in both adult and developing mice over time; likewise, it enabled tracking of lymph nodes. We conclude that this simple method affords great potential to serially track rare, microscopic, tissue-wide events in parenchyma or stroma. Potential applications include tracking proliferation and motility of transplanted cancer cells, stem cell-driven tissue growth, and tumor cell-stromal cell interactions at high spatial and temporal resolution.
language: eng
source: Taylor & Francis Group
identifier: E-ISSN: 2165-9087 ; DOI: 10.4161/intv.21769
fulltext: fulltext_linktorsrc
issn:
  • 2165-9087
  • 21659087
url: Link


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titleNondestructive, serial in vivo imaging of a tissue-flap using a tissue adhesion barrier: Applications for IVM imaging in the mammary fat pad and lymph node
creatorKotsuma, Masakatsu ; Parashurama, Natesh ; Smith, Bryan R. ; Wo, Jonathan ; Ito, Ken ; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.
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ispartofIntraVital, 01 July 2012, Vol.1(1), p.69-76
identifierE-ISSN: 2165-9087 ; DOI: 10.4161/intv.21769
subjectResearch Article ; Ntravital Microscopy ; In Vivo Imaging ; Lymphoma Imaging ; Mammary Gland Imaging ; Sequential Imaging ; Tissue Adhesion Barrier
descriptionIntravital Microscopy (IVM) is a powerful tool for imaging of dynamic events in living subjects and benefits from flexibility of various tissue preparation techniques. For example, a “tissue flap” (TF) approach initially affords high spatial resolution and physiological imaging with minimal tissue preparation, but serial TF imaging greatly increases the effects of pathological inflammation, resulting in postoperative adhesions and tissue injury. We took a materials science approach by implanting a commercially available, thin film, biopolymer tissue adhesion barrier (TAB) beneath the TF during serial imaging of the normal and developing breast in transgenic fluorescent mice, and with a fluorescent orthotopic mouse lymphoma model. We applied the TAB post-operatively beneath the TF to isolate the TF from the underlying peritoneum. When re-imaging the TF every 3–4 d, with a new TAB placed each time, we observed reduced hemorrhage, fibrous connective tissue and soft tissue damage. The presence of the TAB enabled sequential imaging of orthopically located EGFP + -lymphoma cells and associated vasculature at short intervals. In particular, it enabled visualization and tracking of the same individual fluorescent branches of the mammary gland in both adult and developing mice over time; likewise, it enabled tracking of lymph nodes. We conclude that this simple method affords great potential to serially track rare, microscopic, tissue-wide events in parenchyma or stroma. Potential applications include tracking proliferation and motility of transplanted cancer cells, stem cell-driven tissue growth, and tumor cell-stromal cell interactions at high spatial and temporal resolution.
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abstract+ Intravital Microscopy (IVM) is a powerful tool for imaging of dynamic events in living subjects and benefits from flexibility of various tissue preparation techniques. For example, a “tissue flap” (TF) approach initially affords high spatial resolution and physiological imaging with minimal tissue preparation, but serial TF imaging greatly increases the effects of pathological inflammation, resulting in postoperative adhesions and tissue injury. We took a materials science approach by implanting a commercially available, thin film, biopolymer tissue adhesion barrier (TAB) beneath the TF during serial imaging of the normal and developing breast in transgenic fluorescent mice, and with a fluorescent orthotopic mouse lymphoma model. We applied the TAB post-operatively beneath the TF to isolate the TF from the underlying peritoneum. When re-imaging the TF every 3–4 d, with a new TAB placed each time, we observed reduced hemorrhage, fibrous connective tissue and soft tissue damage. The presence of the TAB enabled sequential imaging of orthopically located EGFP + -lymphoma cells and associated vasculature at short intervals. In particular, it enabled visualization and tracking of the same individual fluorescent branches of the mammary gland in both adult and developing mice over time; likewise, it enabled tracking of lymph nodes. We conclude that this simple method affords great potential to serially track rare, microscopic, tissue-wide events in parenchyma or stroma. Potential applications include tracking proliferation and motility of transplanted cancer cells, stem cell-driven tissue growth, and tumor cell-stromal cell interactions at high spatial and temporal resolution.
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date2012-07-01