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Effects of cattle grazing on Platte River caddisflies ( Ironoquia plattensis ) in central Nebraska

The Platte River caddisfly ( Ironoquia plattensis ) is a semiterrestrial limnephilid that inhabits sloughs along the Platte River in central Nebraska (USA). The species was discovered in 1997, and little is known about what controls its limited distribution or threatens its existence. We investigate... Full description

Journal Title: Freshwater Science 03 June April 2012 2012, Vol.31(2), pp.389-394
Main Author: Harner, Mary J.
Other Authors: Geluso, Keith
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 21619549 ; E-ISSN: 21619565 ; DOI: 10.1899/11-147.1
Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1899/11-147.1
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recordid: ucpj10.1899/11-147.1
title: Effects of cattle grazing on Platte River caddisflies ( Ironoquia plattensis ) in central Nebraska
format: Article
creator:
  • Harner, Mary J.
  • Geluso, Keith
subjects:
  • Ironoquia Plattensis
  • Platte River Caddisfly
  • Grazing
  • Aquatic Density
  • Vegetation Structure
  • Slough
  • Platte River
  • Nebraska
  • Ndvi
  • Wetlands
ispartof: Freshwater Science, 03 June April 2012 2012, Vol.31(2), pp.389-394
description: The Platte River caddisfly ( Ironoquia plattensis ) is a semiterrestrial limnephilid that inhabits sloughs along the Platte River in central Nebraska (USA). The species was discovered in 1997, and little is known about what controls its limited distribution or threatens its existence. We investigated effects of grazing by cattle ( Bos taurus ) on caddisfly abundance in a grassland slough. In April 2010, we established exclosures to isolate cattle from areas with caddisflies. We measured aquatic larval densities in April 2010 and 2011. We estimated grazing intensity from the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values extracted from aerial images made in autumn 2010. Grazing intensity varied among plots, but ungrazed plots had more vegetation (higher NDVI values) than grazed plots. In April 2011, larval densities were greater in ungrazed than in grazed plots. Larval densities and NDVI values were strongly positively correlated, a result suggesting that reduction in vegetative cover from grazing was associated with decreased densities of caddisflies. Increased vegetative cover may have provided structure needed for adult courtship and inputs of organic matter to support larval feeding. Repeated, season-long grazing may have long-term negative consequences for the Platte River caddisfly in grassland sloughs when vegetation does not recover and other effects of cattle persist year after year. Resting pastures from grazing to permit vegetation to rebound appears to allow cattle and Platte River caddisflies to coexist in sloughs along the Platte River.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 21619549 ; E-ISSN: 21619565 ; DOI: 10.1899/11-147.1
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2161-9549
  • 21619549
  • 2161-9565
  • 21619565
url: Link


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titleEffects of cattle grazing on Platte River caddisflies ( Ironoquia plattensis ) in central Nebraska
creatorHarner, Mary J. ; Geluso, Keith
ispartofFreshwater Science, 03 June April 2012 2012, Vol.31(2), pp.389-394
subjectIronoquia Plattensis ; Platte River Caddisfly ; Grazing ; Aquatic Density ; Vegetation Structure ; Slough ; Platte River ; Nebraska ; Ndvi ; Wetlands
descriptionThe Platte River caddisfly ( Ironoquia plattensis ) is a semiterrestrial limnephilid that inhabits sloughs along the Platte River in central Nebraska (USA). The species was discovered in 1997, and little is known about what controls its limited distribution or threatens its existence. We investigated effects of grazing by cattle ( Bos taurus ) on caddisfly abundance in a grassland slough. In April 2010, we established exclosures to isolate cattle from areas with caddisflies. We measured aquatic larval densities in April 2010 and 2011. We estimated grazing intensity from the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values extracted from aerial images made in autumn 2010. Grazing intensity varied among plots, but ungrazed plots had more vegetation (higher NDVI values) than grazed plots. In April 2011, larval densities were greater in ungrazed than in grazed plots. Larval densities and NDVI values were strongly positively correlated, a result suggesting that reduction in vegetative cover from grazing was associated with decreased densities of caddisflies. Increased vegetative cover may have provided structure needed for adult courtship and inputs of organic matter to support larval feeding. Repeated, season-long grazing may have long-term negative consequences for the Platte River caddisfly in grassland sloughs when vegetation does not recover and other effects of cattle persist year after year. Resting pastures from grazing to permit vegetation to rebound appears to allow cattle and Platte River caddisflies to coexist in sloughs along the Platte River.
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descriptionThe Platte River caddisfly ( Ironoquia plattensis ) is a semiterrestrial limnephilid that inhabits sloughs along the Platte River in central Nebraska (USA). The species was discovered in 1997, and little is known about what controls its limited distribution or threatens its existence. We investigated effects of grazing by cattle ( Bos taurus ) on caddisfly abundance in a grassland slough. In April 2010, we established exclosures to isolate cattle from areas with caddisflies. We measured aquatic larval densities in April 2010 and 2011. We estimated grazing intensity from the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values extracted from aerial images made in autumn 2010. Grazing intensity varied among plots, but ungrazed plots had more vegetation (higher NDVI values) than grazed plots. In April 2011, larval densities were greater in ungrazed than in grazed plots. Larval densities and NDVI values were strongly positively correlated, a result suggesting that reduction in vegetative cover from grazing was associated with decreased densities of caddisflies. Increased vegetative cover may have provided structure needed for adult courtship and inputs of organic matter to support larval feeding. Repeated, season-long grazing may have long-term negative consequences for the Platte River caddisfly in grassland sloughs when vegetation does not recover and other effects of cattle persist year after year. Resting pastures from grazing to permit vegetation to rebound appears to allow cattle and Platte River caddisflies to coexist in sloughs along the Platte River.
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abstractThe Platte River caddisfly ( Ironoquia plattensis ) is a semiterrestrial limnephilid that inhabits sloughs along the Platte River in central Nebraska (USA). The species was discovered in 1997, and little is known about what controls its limited distribution or threatens its existence. We investigated effects of grazing by cattle ( Bos taurus ) on caddisfly abundance in a grassland slough. In April 2010, we established exclosures to isolate cattle from areas with caddisflies. We measured aquatic larval densities in April 2010 and 2011. We estimated grazing intensity from the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI) values extracted from aerial images made in autumn 2010. Grazing intensity varied among plots, but ungrazed plots had more vegetation (higher NDVI values) than grazed plots. In April 2011, larval densities were greater in ungrazed than in grazed plots. Larval densities and NDVI values were strongly positively correlated, a result suggesting that reduction in vegetative cover from grazing was associated with decreased densities of caddisflies. Increased vegetative cover may have provided structure needed for adult courtship and inputs of organic matter to support larval feeding. Repeated, season-long grazing may have long-term negative consequences for the Platte River caddisfly in grassland sloughs when vegetation does not recover and other effects of cattle persist year after year. Resting pastures from grazing to permit vegetation to rebound appears to allow cattle and Platte River caddisflies to coexist in sloughs along the Platte River.
pubUniversity of Chicago Press
doi10.1899/11-147.1