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Large wildfire trends in the western United States, 1984–2011

We used a database capturing large wildfires (> 405 ha) in the western U.S. to document regional trends in fire occurrence, total fire area, fire size, and day of year of ignition for 1984–2011. Over the western U.S. and in a majority of ecoregions, we found significant, increasing trends in the num... Full description

Journal Title: Geophysical Research Letters 28 April 2014, Vol.41(8), pp.2928-2933
Main Author: Dennison, Philip E.
Other Authors: Brewer, Simon C. , Arnold, James D. , Moritz, Max A.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0094-8276 ; E-ISSN: 1944-8007 ; DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059576
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recordid: wj10.1002/2014GL059576
title: Large wildfire trends in the western United States, 1984–2011
format: Article
creator:
  • Dennison, Philip E.
  • Brewer, Simon C.
  • Arnold, James D.
  • Moritz, Max A.
subjects:
  • Wildfire
  • Climate Variability
  • Remote Sensing
ispartof: Geophysical Research Letters, 28 April 2014, Vol.41(8), pp.2928-2933
description: We used a database capturing large wildfires (> 405 ha) in the western U.S. to document regional trends in fire occurrence, total fire area, fire size, and day of year of ignition for 1984–2011. Over the western U.S. and in a majority of ecoregions, we found significant, increasing trends in the number of large fires and/or total large fire area per year. Trends were most significant for southern and mountain ecoregions, coinciding with trends toward increased drought severity. For all ecoregions combined, the number of large fires increased at a rate of seven fires per year, while total fire area increased at a rate of 355 km per year. Continuing changes in climate, invasive species, and consequences of past fire management, added to the impacts of larger, more frequent fires, will drive further disruptions to fire regimes of the western U.S. and other fire‐prone regions of the world. Number of large fires and large fire area have increased across the western U.S.Fire activity trends were most significant in southern and mountain ecoregionsIncreased fire in these ecoregions coincided with increased drought severity
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0094-8276 ; E-ISSN: 1944-8007 ; DOI: 10.1002/2014GL059576
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0094-8276
  • 00948276
  • 1944-8007
  • 19448007
url: Link


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titleLarge wildfire trends in the western United States, 1984–2011
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subjectWildfire ; Climate Variability ; Remote Sensing
descriptionWe used a database capturing large wildfires (> 405 ha) in the western U.S. to document regional trends in fire occurrence, total fire area, fire size, and day of year of ignition for 1984–2011. Over the western U.S. and in a majority of ecoregions, we found significant, increasing trends in the number of large fires and/or total large fire area per year. Trends were most significant for southern and mountain ecoregions, coinciding with trends toward increased drought severity. For all ecoregions combined, the number of large fires increased at a rate of seven fires per year, while total fire area increased at a rate of 355 km per year. Continuing changes in climate, invasive species, and consequences of past fire management, added to the impacts of larger, more frequent fires, will drive further disruptions to fire regimes of the western U.S. and other fire‐prone regions of the world. Number of large fires and large fire area have increased across the western U.S.Fire activity trends were most significant in southern and mountain ecoregionsIncreased fire in these ecoregions coincided with increased drought severity
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titleLarge wildfire trends in the western United States, 1984–2011
descriptionWe used a database capturing large wildfires (> 405 ha) in the western U.S. to document regional trends in fire occurrence, total fire area, fire size, and day of year of ignition for 1984–2011. Over the western U.S. and in a majority of ecoregions, we found significant, increasing trends in the number of large fires and/or total large fire area per year. Trends were most significant for southern and mountain ecoregions, coinciding with trends toward increased drought severity. For all ecoregions combined, the number of large fires increased at a rate of seven fires per year, while total fire area increased at a rate of 355 km per year. Continuing changes in climate, invasive species, and consequences of past fire management, added to the impacts of larger, more frequent fires, will drive further disruptions to fire regimes of the western U.S. and other fire‐prone regions of the world. Number of large fires and large fire area have increased across the western U.S.Fire activity trends were most significant in southern and mountain ecoregionsIncreased fire in these ecoregions coincided with increased drought severity
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abstractWe used a database capturing large wildfires (> 405 ha) in the western U.S. to document regional trends in fire occurrence, total fire area, fire size, and day of year of ignition for 1984–2011. Over the western U.S. and in a majority of ecoregions, we found significant, increasing trends in the number of large fires and/or total large fire area per year. Trends were most significant for southern and mountain ecoregions, coinciding with trends toward increased drought severity. For all ecoregions combined, the number of large fires increased at a rate of seven fires per year, while total fire area increased at a rate of 355 km per year. Continuing changes in climate, invasive species, and consequences of past fire management, added to the impacts of larger, more frequent fires, will drive further disruptions to fire regimes of the western U.S. and other fire‐prone regions of the world. Number of large fires and large fire area have increased across the western U.S.Fire activity trends were most significant in southern and mountain ecoregionsIncreased fire in these ecoregions coincided with increased drought severity
doi10.1002/2014GL059576
pages2928-2933
date2014-04-28