schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Methane release from pingo‐like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost

The Holocene marine transgression starting at ~19 ka flooded the Arctic shelves driving extensive thawing of terrestrial permafrost. It thereby promoted methanogenesis within sediments, the dissociation of gas hydrates, and the release of formerly trapped gas, with the accumulation in pressure of re... Full description

Journal Title: Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface August 2015, Vol.120(8), pp.1515-1529
Main Author: Serov, Pavel
Other Authors: Portnov, Alexey , Mienert, Jurgen , Semenov, Peter , Ilatovskaya, Polina
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 2169-9003 ; E-ISSN: 2169-9011 ; DOI: 10.1002/2015JF003467
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1002/2015JF003467
title: Methane release from pingo‐like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost
format: Article
creator:
  • Serov, Pavel
  • Portnov, Alexey
  • Mienert, Jurgen
  • Semenov, Peter
  • Ilatovskaya, Polina
subjects:
  • Permafrost
  • Pingo‐Like Features
  • Methane
ispartof: Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, August 2015, Vol.120(8), pp.1515-1529
description: The Holocene marine transgression starting at ~19 ka flooded the Arctic shelves driving extensive thawing of terrestrial permafrost. It thereby promoted methanogenesis within sediments, the dissociation of gas hydrates, and the release of formerly trapped gas, with the accumulation in pressure of released methane eventually triggering blowouts through weakened zones in the overlying and thinned permafrost. Here we present a range of geophysical and chemical scenarios for the formation of pingo‐like formations (PLFs) leading to potential blowouts. Specifically, we report on methane anomalies from the South Kara Sea shelf focusing on two PLFs imaged from high‐resolution seismic records. A variety of geochemical methods are applied to study concentrations and types of gas, its character, and genesis. PLF 1 demonstrates ubiquitously low‐methane concentrations (14.2–55.3 ppm) that are likely due to partly unfrozen sediments with an ice‐saturated internal core reaching close to the seafloor. In contrast, PLF 2 reveals anomalously high‐methane concentrations of >120,000 ppm where frozen sediments are completely absent. The methane in all recovered samples is of microbial and not of thermogenic origin from deep hydrocarbon sources. However, the relatively low organic matter content (0.52–1.69%) of seafloor sediments restricts extensive in situ methane production. As a consequence, we hypothesize that the high‐methane concentrations at PLF 2 are due to microbial methane production and migration from a deeper source. PLFs of uncertain origin were discovered on the South Kara Sea shelf Anomalous concentrations of biogenic methane correspond to one of the PLFs Subpermafrost methane accumulations can lead to the formation of PLFs
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 2169-9003 ; E-ISSN: 2169-9011 ; DOI: 10.1002/2015JF003467
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2169-9003
  • 21699003
  • 2169-9011
  • 21699011
url: Link


@attributes
ID1660803781
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1002/2015JF003467
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1002/2015JF003467
sourcesystemPC
pqid1732810036
display
typearticle
titleMethane release from pingo‐like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost
creatorSerov, Pavel ; Portnov, Alexey ; Mienert, Jurgen ; Semenov, Peter ; Ilatovskaya, Polina
ispartofJournal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface, August 2015, Vol.120(8), pp.1515-1529
identifier
subjectPermafrost ; Pingo‐Like Features ; Methane
descriptionThe Holocene marine transgression starting at ~19 ka flooded the Arctic shelves driving extensive thawing of terrestrial permafrost. It thereby promoted methanogenesis within sediments, the dissociation of gas hydrates, and the release of formerly trapped gas, with the accumulation in pressure of released methane eventually triggering blowouts through weakened zones in the overlying and thinned permafrost. Here we present a range of geophysical and chemical scenarios for the formation of pingo‐like formations (PLFs) leading to potential blowouts. Specifically, we report on methane anomalies from the South Kara Sea shelf focusing on two PLFs imaged from high‐resolution seismic records. A variety of geochemical methods are applied to study concentrations and types of gas, its character, and genesis. PLF 1 demonstrates ubiquitously low‐methane concentrations (14.2–55.3 ppm) that are likely due to partly unfrozen sediments with an ice‐saturated internal core reaching close to the seafloor. In contrast, PLF 2 reveals anomalously high‐methane concentrations of >120,000 ppm where frozen sediments are completely absent. The methane in all recovered samples is of microbial and not of thermogenic origin from deep hydrocarbon sources. However, the relatively low organic matter content (0.52–1.69%) of seafloor sediments restricts extensive in situ methane production. As a consequence, we hypothesize that the high‐methane concentrations at PLF 2 are due to microbial methane production and migration from a deeper source. PLFs of uncertain origin were discovered on the South Kara Sea shelf Anomalous concentrations of biogenic methane correspond to one of the PLFs Subpermafrost methane accumulations can lead to the formation of PLFs
source
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Serov, Pavel
1Portnov, Alexey
2Mienert, Jurgen
3Semenov, Peter
4Ilatovskaya, Polina
titleMethane release from pingo‐like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost
descriptionThe Holocene marine transgression starting at ~19 ka flooded the Arctic shelves driving extensive thawing of terrestrial permafrost. It thereby promoted methanogenesis within sediments, the dissociation of gas hydrates, and the release of formerly trapped gas, with the accumulation in pressure of released methane eventually triggering blowouts through weakened zones in the overlying and thinned permafrost. Here we present a range of geophysical and chemical scenarios for the formation of pingo‐like formations (PLFs) leading to potential blowouts. Specifically, we report on methane anomalies from the South Kara Sea shelf focusing on two PLFs imaged from high‐resolution seismic records. A variety of geochemical methods are applied to study concentrations and types of gas, its character, and genesis. PLF 1 demonstrates ubiquitously low‐methane concentrations (14.2–55.3 ppm) that are likely due to partly unfrozen sediments with an ice‐saturated internal core reaching close to the seafloor. In contrast, PLF 2 reveals anomalously high‐methane concentrations of >120,000 ppm where frozen sediments are completely absent. The methane in all recovered samples is of microbial and not of thermogenic origin from deep hydrocarbon sources. However, the relatively low organic matter content (0.52–1.69%) of seafloor sediments restricts extensive in situ methane production. As a consequence, we hypothesize that the high‐methane concentrations at PLF 2 are due to microbial methane production and migration from a deeper source. PLFs of uncertain origin were discovered on the South Kara Sea shelf Anomalous concentrations of biogenic methane correspond to one of the PLFs Subpermafrost methane accumulations can lead to the formation of PLFs
subject
0Permafrost
1Pingo‐Like Features
2Methane
general
010.1002/2015JF003467
1Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1002/2015JF003467
issn
02169-9003
121699003
22169-9011
321699011
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2015
addtitle
0Journal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
1J. Geophys. Res. Earth Surf.
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[pqid, pages]
sort
titleMethane release from pingo‐like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost
authorSerov, Pavel ; Portnov, Alexey ; Mienert, Jurgen ; Semenov, Peter ; Ilatovskaya, Polina
creationdate20150800
facets
frbrgroupid4362065700791807887
frbrtype5
creationdate2015
topic
0Permafrost
1Pingo‐Like Features
2Methane
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Serov, Pavel
1Portnov, Alexey
2Mienert, Jurgen
3Semenov, Peter
4Ilatovskaya, Polina
jtitleJournal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Serov
1Portnov
2Mienert
3Semenov
4Ilatovskaya
aufirst
0Pavel
1Alexey
2Jurgen
3Peter
4Polina
au
0Serov, Pavel
1Portnov, Alexey
2Mienert, Jurgen
3Semenov, Peter
4Ilatovskaya, Polina
atitleMethane release from pingo‐like features across the South Kara Sea shelf, an area of thawing offshore permafrost
jtitleJournal of Geophysical Research: Earth Surface
risdate201508
volume120
issue8
spage1515
epage1529
issn2169-9003
eissn2169-9011
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
abstractThe Holocene marine transgression starting at ~19 ka flooded the Arctic shelves driving extensive thawing of terrestrial permafrost. It thereby promoted methanogenesis within sediments, the dissociation of gas hydrates, and the release of formerly trapped gas, with the accumulation in pressure of released methane eventually triggering blowouts through weakened zones in the overlying and thinned permafrost. Here we present a range of geophysical and chemical scenarios for the formation of pingo‐like formations (PLFs) leading to potential blowouts. Specifically, we report on methane anomalies from the South Kara Sea shelf focusing on two PLFs imaged from high‐resolution seismic records. A variety of geochemical methods are applied to study concentrations and types of gas, its character, and genesis. PLF 1 demonstrates ubiquitously low‐methane concentrations (14.2–55.3 ppm) that are likely due to partly unfrozen sediments with an ice‐saturated internal core reaching close to the seafloor. In contrast, PLF 2 reveals anomalously high‐methane concentrations of >120,000 ppm where frozen sediments are completely absent. The methane in all recovered samples is of microbial and not of thermogenic origin from deep hydrocarbon sources. However, the relatively low organic matter content (0.52–1.69%) of seafloor sediments restricts extensive in situ methane production. As a consequence, we hypothesize that the high‐methane concentrations at PLF 2 are due to microbial methane production and migration from a deeper source. PLFs of uncertain origin were discovered on the South Kara Sea shelf Anomalous concentrations of biogenic methane correspond to one of the PLFs Subpermafrost methane accumulations can lead to the formation of PLFs
doi10.1002/2015JF003467
pages1515-1529
date2015-08