schliessen

Filtern

 

Bibliotheken

Alcohol consumption and probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder

Abstract Objective To systematically examine the association between alcohol intake and likelihood of having probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder ( pRBD ) 6 years later. Methods The study included 11,905 participants (mean age: 47.7 years) of the Kailuan Study, free of stroke, cancer,... Full description

Journal Title: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology October 2018, Vol.5(10), pp.1176-1183
Main Author: Ma, Chaoran
Other Authors: Pavlova, Milena , Li, Junjuan , Liu, Ying , Sun, Yujie , Huang, Zhe , Wu, Shouling , Gao, Xiang
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language:
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 2328-9503 ; E-ISSN: 2328-9503 ; DOI: 10.1002/acn3.630
Zum Text:
SendSend as email Add to Book BagAdd to Book Bag
Staff View
recordid: wj10.1002/acn3.630
title: Alcohol consumption and probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
format: Article
creator:
  • Ma, Chaoran
  • Pavlova, Milena
  • Li, Junjuan
  • Liu, Ying
  • Sun, Yujie
  • Huang, Zhe
  • Wu, Shouling
  • Gao, Xiang
subjects:
  • Research Article
  • Research Articles
ispartof: Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, October 2018, Vol.5(10), pp.1176-1183
description: Abstract Objective To systematically examine the association between alcohol intake and likelihood of having probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder ( pRBD ) 6 years later. Methods The study included 11,905 participants (mean age: 47.7 years) of the Kailuan Study, free of stroke, cancer, Parkinson disease, dementia, and head injury in 2006. We determined pRBD using a validated RBD questionnaire–Hong Kong in 2012. Amounts and types of alcohol intake were collected with questionnaire. Participants were categorized into: nondrinkers, light (women: 0–0.4 servings/day; men: 0–0.9 servings/day), moderate (women: 0.5–1.0 servings/day; men: 1–2 servings/day), and heavy drinkers(women: >1 serving/day; men: >2 servings/day). To examine the alcohol‐ pRBD relationship, we used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios ( OR s) and 95% confidence intervals ( CI s), adjusting for demographic characteristics, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity, body mass index, and plasma concentrations of lipids and urate. Results Compared with nondrinkers, current drinkers had a 23% higher likelihood of having pRBD (adjusted OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.59). Both moderate (adjusted OR : 1.53, 95% CI 1.01–2.30) and heavy drinkers (adjusted OR : 1.29, 95% CI 1.00–1.66), but not light drinkers (adjusted OR : 1.16, 95% CI 0.94–1.44), had a significantly higher likelihood of having pRBD , relative to nondrinkers. There was a nonsignificant trend between consumption of each individual alcoholic beverages (i.e., beer, wine, or hard liquor) and higher likelihood of having pRBD (adjusted OR s ranged from 1.11 to 1.49). Conclusions Alcohol consumption was associated with a higher likelihood of having pRBD . Future prospective studies with clinically confirmed RBD , large sample size for information on types of alcoholic beverage are warranted.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 2328-9503 ; E-ISSN: 2328-9503 ; DOI: 10.1002/acn3.630
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 2328-9503
  • 23289503
url: Link


@attributes
ID1452973404
RANK0.07
NO1
SEARCH_ENGINEprimo_central_multiple_fe
SEARCH_ENGINE_TYPEPrimo Central Search Engine
LOCALfalse
PrimoNMBib
record
control
sourcerecordid10.1002/acn3.630
sourceidwj
recordidTN_wj10.1002/acn3.630
sourcesystemPC
pqid2126902555
display
typearticle
titleAlcohol consumption and probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
creatorMa, Chaoran ; Pavlova, Milena ; Li, Junjuan ; Liu, Ying ; Sun, Yujie ; Huang, Zhe ; Wu, Shouling ; Gao, Xiang
ispartofAnnals of Clinical and Translational Neurology, October 2018, Vol.5(10), pp.1176-1183
identifier
source
subjectResearch Article ; Research Articles;
descriptionAbstract Objective To systematically examine the association between alcohol intake and likelihood of having probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder ( pRBD ) 6 years later. Methods The study included 11,905 participants (mean age: 47.7 years) of the Kailuan Study, free of stroke, cancer, Parkinson disease, dementia, and head injury in 2006. We determined pRBD using a validated RBD questionnaire–Hong Kong in 2012. Amounts and types of alcohol intake were collected with questionnaire. Participants were categorized into: nondrinkers, light (women: 0–0.4 servings/day; men: 0–0.9 servings/day), moderate (women: 0.5–1.0 servings/day; men: 1–2 servings/day), and heavy drinkers(women: >1 serving/day; men: >2 servings/day). To examine the alcohol‐ pRBD relationship, we used logistic regression to calculate odds ratios ( OR s) and 95% confidence intervals ( CI s), adjusting for demographic characteristics, smoking, hypertension, diabetes, physical activity, body mass index, and plasma concentrations of lipids and urate. Results Compared with nondrinkers, current drinkers had a 23% higher likelihood of having pRBD (adjusted OR 1.23, 95% CI 1.07–1.59). Both moderate (adjusted OR : 1.53, 95% CI 1.01–2.30) and heavy drinkers (adjusted OR : 1.29, 95% CI 1.00–1.66), but not light drinkers (adjusted OR : 1.16, 95% CI 0.94–1.44), had a significantly higher likelihood of having pRBD , relative to nondrinkers. There was a nonsignificant trend between consumption of each individual alcoholic beverages (i.e., beer, wine, or hard liquor) and higher likelihood of having pRBD (adjusted OR s ranged from 1.11 to 1.49). Conclusions Alcohol consumption was associated with a higher likelihood of having pRBD . Future prospective studies with clinically confirmed RBD , large sample size for information on types of alcoholic beverage are warranted.
version6
lds50peer_reviewed
links
openurl$$Topenurl_article
openurlfulltext$$Topenurlfull_article
search
creatorcontrib
0Ma, Chaoran
1Pavlova, Milena
2Li, Junjuan
3Liu, Ying
4Sun, Yujie
5Huang, Zhe
6Wu, Shouling
7Gao, Xiang
titleAlcohol consumption and probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
general
010.1002/acn3.630
1Wiley Online Library
sourceidwj
recordidwj10.1002/acn3.630
issn
02328-9503
123289503
rsrctypearticle
creationdate2018
addtitle
0Annals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
1Ann Clin Transl Neurol
searchscope
0wj
1wiley
scope
0wj
1wiley
lsr30VSR-Enriched:[subject, description, pqid, pages]
sort
titleAlcohol consumption and probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
authorMa, Chaoran ; Pavlova, Milena ; Li, Junjuan ; Liu, Ying ; Sun, Yujie ; Huang, Zhe ; Wu, Shouling ; Gao, Xiang
creationdate20181000
facets
frbrgroupid-6423130525276997279
frbrtype5
newrecords20181017
creationdate2018
collectionWiley Online Library
prefilterarticles
rsrctypearticles
creatorcontrib
0Ma, Chaoran
1Pavlova, Milena
2Li, Junjuan
3Liu, Ying
4Sun, Yujie
5Huang, Zhe
6Wu, Shouling
7Gao, Xiang
jtitleAnnals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
toplevelpeer_reviewed
delivery
delcategoryRemote Search Resource
fulltextfulltext
addata
aulast
0Ma
1Pavlova
2Li
3Liu
4Sun
5Huang
6Wu
7Gao
aufirst
0Chaoran
1Milena
2Junjuan
3Ying
4Yujie
5Zhe
6Shouling
7Xiang
au
0Ma, Chaoran
1Pavlova, Milena
2Li, Junjuan
3Liu, Ying
4Sun, Yujie
5Huang, Zhe
6Wu, Shouling
7Gao, Xiang
atitleAlcohol consumption and probable rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder
jtitleAnnals of Clinical and Translational Neurology
risdate201810
volume5
issue10
spage1176
epage1183
issn2328-9503
eissn2328-9503
genrearticle
ristypeJOUR
doi10.1002/acn3.630
pages1176-1183
date2018-10