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Self‐Calibrating Mechanochromic Fluorescent Polymers Based on Encapsulated Excimer‐Forming Dyes

While mechanochemical transduction principles are omnipresent in nature, mimicking these in artificial materials is challenging. The ability to reliably detect the exposure of man‐made objects to mechanical forces is, however, of great interest for many applications, including structural health moni... Full description

Journal Title: Advanced Materials May 2018, Vol.30(19), pp.n/a-n/a
Main Author: Calvino, Céline
Other Authors: Guha, Anirvan , Weder, Christoph , Schrettl, Stephen
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
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ID: ISSN: 0935-9648 ; E-ISSN: 1521-4095 ; DOI: 10.1002/adma.201704603
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recordid: wj10.1002/adma.201704603
title: Self‐Calibrating Mechanochromic Fluorescent Polymers Based on Encapsulated Excimer‐Forming Dyes
format: Article
creator:
  • Calvino, Céline
  • Guha, Anirvan
  • Weder, Christoph
  • Schrettl, Stephen
subjects:
  • Aggregachromic
  • Bioinspired
  • Excimer Formation
  • Mechanochromic
  • Microcapsules
ispartof: Advanced Materials, May 2018, Vol.30(19), pp.n/a-n/a
description: While mechanochemical transduction principles are omnipresent in nature, mimicking these in artificial materials is challenging. The ability to reliably detect the exposure of man‐made objects to mechanical forces is, however, of great interest for many applications, including structural health monitoring and tamper‐proof packaging. A useful concept to achieve mechanochromic responses in polymers is the integration of microcapsules, which rupture upon deformation and release a payload causing a visually detectable response. Herein, it is reported that this approach can be used to create mechanochromic fluorescent materials that show a direct and ratiometric response to mechanical deformation. This can be achieved by filling poly(urea‐formaldehyde) microcapsules with a solution of a photoluminescent aggregachromic cyano‐substituted oligo(‐phenylene vinylene) and embedding these particles in poly(dimethylsiloxane). The application of mechanical force by way of impact, incision, or tensile deformation opens the microcapsules and releases the fluorophore in the damaged area. Due to excimer formation, the subsequent aggregation of the dye furnishes a detectable fluorescence color change. With the emission from unopened microcapsules as built‐in reference, the approach affords materials that are self‐calibrating. This new concept appears to be readily applicable to a range of polymer matrices and allows for the straightforward assessment of their structural integrity. is achieved by incorporating microcapsules filled with solutions of excimer‐forming fluorescent dyes. Deformation of such materials breaks the microcapsules and a readily detectable change of the fluorescence color occurs upon release and aggregation of the dye. The emission of undamaged capsules serves as a reference, enabling ratiometric measurements and therewith quantitative assessments of mechanical impact.
language:
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0935-9648 ; E-ISSN: 1521-4095 ; DOI: 10.1002/adma.201704603
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0935-9648
  • 09359648
  • 1521-4095
  • 15214095
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subjectAggregachromic ; Bioinspired ; Excimer Formation ; Mechanochromic ; Microcapsules
descriptionWhile mechanochemical transduction principles are omnipresent in nature, mimicking these in artificial materials is challenging. The ability to reliably detect the exposure of man‐made objects to mechanical forces is, however, of great interest for many applications, including structural health monitoring and tamper‐proof packaging. A useful concept to achieve mechanochromic responses in polymers is the integration of microcapsules, which rupture upon deformation and release a payload causing a visually detectable response. Herein, it is reported that this approach can be used to create mechanochromic fluorescent materials that show a direct and ratiometric response to mechanical deformation. This can be achieved by filling poly(urea‐formaldehyde) microcapsules with a solution of a photoluminescent aggregachromic cyano‐substituted oligo(‐phenylene vinylene) and embedding these particles in poly(dimethylsiloxane). The application of mechanical force by way of impact, incision, or tensile deformation opens the microcapsules and releases the fluorophore in the damaged area. Due to excimer formation, the subsequent aggregation of the dye furnishes a detectable fluorescence color change. With the emission from unopened microcapsules as built‐in reference, the approach affords materials that are self‐calibrating. This new concept appears to be readily applicable to a range of polymer matrices and allows for the straightforward assessment of their structural integrity. is achieved by incorporating microcapsules filled with solutions of excimer‐forming fluorescent dyes. Deformation of such materials breaks the microcapsules and a readily detectable change of the fluorescence color occurs upon release and aggregation of the dye. The emission of undamaged capsules serves as a reference, enabling ratiometric measurements and therewith quantitative assessments of mechanical impact.
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abstractWhile mechanochemical transduction principles are omnipresent in nature, mimicking these in artificial materials is challenging. The ability to reliably detect the exposure of man‐made objects to mechanical forces is, however, of great interest for many applications, including structural health monitoring and tamper‐proof packaging. A useful concept to achieve mechanochromic responses in polymers is the integration of microcapsules, which rupture upon deformation and release a payload causing a visually detectable response. Herein, it is reported that this approach can be used to create mechanochromic fluorescent materials that show a direct and ratiometric response to mechanical deformation. This can be achieved by filling poly(urea‐formaldehyde) microcapsules with a solution of a photoluminescent aggregachromic cyano‐substituted oligo(‐phenylene vinylene) and embedding these particles in poly(dimethylsiloxane). The application of mechanical force by way of impact, incision, or tensile deformation opens the microcapsules and releases the fluorophore in the damaged area. Due to excimer formation, the subsequent aggregation of the dye furnishes a detectable fluorescence color change. With the emission from unopened microcapsules as built‐in reference, the approach affords materials that are self‐calibrating. This new concept appears to be readily applicable to a range of polymer matrices and allows for the straightforward assessment of their structural integrity. is achieved by incorporating microcapsules filled with solutions of excimer‐forming fluorescent dyes. Deformation of such materials breaks the microcapsules and a readily detectable change of the fluorescence color occurs upon release and aggregation of the dye. The emission of undamaged capsules serves as a reference, enabling ratiometric measurements and therewith quantitative assessments of mechanical impact.
doi10.1002/adma.201704603
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