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Encapsulated fusion protein confers “sense and respond” activity to chitosan–alginate capsules to manipulate bacterial quorum sensing

We demonstrate that “nanofactory”‐loaded biopolymer capsules placed in the midst of a bacterial population can direct bacterial communication. Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria communicate through small‐molecules, such as autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2), leading to collective behaviors such as... Full description

Journal Title: Biotechnology and Bioengineering February 2013, Vol.110(2), pp.552-562
Main Author: Gupta, Apoorv
Other Authors: Terrell, Jessica L. , Fernandes, Rohan , Dowling, Matthew B. , Payne, Gregory F. , Raghavan, Srinivasa R. , Bentley, William E.
Format: Electronic Article Electronic Article
Language: English
Subjects:
ID: ISSN: 0006-3592 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0290 ; DOI: 10.1002/bit.24711
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recordid: wj10.1002/bit.24711
title: Encapsulated fusion protein confers “sense and respond” activity to chitosan–alginate capsules to manipulate bacterial quorum sensing
format: Article
creator:
  • Gupta, Apoorv
  • Terrell, Jessica L.
  • Fernandes, Rohan
  • Dowling, Matthew B.
  • Payne, Gregory F.
  • Raghavan, Srinivasa R.
  • Bentley, William E.
subjects:
  • Alginate
  • Chitosan
  • Capsules
  • Quorum Sensing
  • Bacteria
  • Polysaccharide
  • Biopolymer
  • Artificial Cell
  • Autoinducer‐2
  • S‐Adenosylhomocysteine
  • Nanofactory
ispartof: Biotechnology and Bioengineering, February 2013, Vol.110(2), pp.552-562
description: We demonstrate that “nanofactory”‐loaded biopolymer capsules placed in the midst of a bacterial population can direct bacterial communication. Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria communicate through small‐molecules, such as autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2), leading to collective behaviors such as virulence and biofilm formation. In our approach, a “nanofactory” construct is created, which comprises an antibody complexed with a fusion protein that produces AI‐2. These nanofactories are entrapped within capsules formed by electrostatic complexation of cationic (chitosan) and anionic (sodium alginate) biopolymers. The chitosan capsule shell is crosslinked by tripolyphosphate (TPP) to confer structural integrity. The capsule shell is impermeable to the encapsulated nanofactories, but freely permeable to small molecules. In turn, the capsules are able to take in substrates from the external medium via diffusion, and convert these via the nanofactories into AI‐2, which then diffuses out. The exported AI‐2 is shown to stimulate QS responses in vicinal Directing bacterial population behavior has potential applications in next‐generation antimicrobial therapy and pathogen detection. We also envision such capsules to be akin to artificial “cells” that can participate in native biological signaling and communicate in real‐time with the human microbiome. Through such interaction capabilities, these “cells” may sense the health of the microbiome, and direct its function in a desired, host‐friendly manner. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 552–562. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Chitosan–alginate capsules were formed and subsequently loaded with an AI‐2 synthase “nanofactory” to modulate QS activity in . We propose that biologically inspired carriers of molecular synthesis systems in native settings can modulate bacterial populations, including those of the human microbiome.
language: eng
source:
identifier: ISSN: 0006-3592 ; E-ISSN: 1097-0290 ; DOI: 10.1002/bit.24711
fulltext: fulltext
issn:
  • 0006-3592
  • 00063592
  • 1097-0290
  • 10970290
url: Link


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titleEncapsulated fusion protein confers “sense and respond” activity to chitosan–alginate capsules to manipulate bacterial quorum sensing
creatorGupta, Apoorv ; Terrell, Jessica L. ; Fernandes, Rohan ; Dowling, Matthew B. ; Payne, Gregory F. ; Raghavan, Srinivasa R. ; Bentley, William E.
ispartofBiotechnology and Bioengineering, February 2013, Vol.110(2), pp.552-562
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subjectAlginate ; Chitosan ; Capsules ; Quorum Sensing ; Bacteria ; Polysaccharide ; Biopolymer ; Artificial Cell ; Autoinducer‐2 ; S‐Adenosylhomocysteine ; Nanofactory
descriptionWe demonstrate that “nanofactory”‐loaded biopolymer capsules placed in the midst of a bacterial population can direct bacterial communication. Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria communicate through small‐molecules, such as autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2), leading to collective behaviors such as virulence and biofilm formation. In our approach, a “nanofactory” construct is created, which comprises an antibody complexed with a fusion protein that produces AI‐2. These nanofactories are entrapped within capsules formed by electrostatic complexation of cationic (chitosan) and anionic (sodium alginate) biopolymers. The chitosan capsule shell is crosslinked by tripolyphosphate (TPP) to confer structural integrity. The capsule shell is impermeable to the encapsulated nanofactories, but freely permeable to small molecules. In turn, the capsules are able to take in substrates from the external medium via diffusion, and convert these via the nanofactories into AI‐2, which then diffuses out. The exported AI‐2 is shown to stimulate QS responses in vicinal Directing bacterial population behavior has potential applications in next‐generation antimicrobial therapy and pathogen detection. We also envision such capsules to be akin to artificial “cells” that can participate in native biological signaling and communicate in real‐time with the human microbiome. Through such interaction capabilities, these “cells” may sense the health of the microbiome, and direct its function in a desired, host‐friendly manner. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 552–562. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Chitosan–alginate capsules were formed and subsequently loaded with an AI‐2 synthase “nanofactory” to modulate QS activity in . We propose that biologically inspired carriers of molecular synthesis systems in native settings can modulate bacterial populations, including those of the human microbiome.
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titleEncapsulated fusion protein confers “sense and respond” activity to chitosan–alginate capsules to manipulate bacterial quorum sensing
descriptionWe demonstrate that “nanofactory”‐loaded biopolymer capsules placed in the midst of a bacterial population can direct bacterial communication. Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria communicate through small‐molecules, such as autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2), leading to collective behaviors such as virulence and biofilm formation. In our approach, a “nanofactory” construct is created, which comprises an antibody complexed with a fusion protein that produces AI‐2. These nanofactories are entrapped within capsules formed by electrostatic complexation of cationic (chitosan) and anionic (sodium alginate) biopolymers. The chitosan capsule shell is crosslinked by tripolyphosphate (TPP) to confer structural integrity. The capsule shell is impermeable to the encapsulated nanofactories, but freely permeable to small molecules. In turn, the capsules are able to take in substrates from the external medium via diffusion, and convert these via the nanofactories into AI‐2, which then diffuses out. The exported AI‐2 is shown to stimulate QS responses in vicinal Directing bacterial population behavior has potential applications in next‐generation antimicrobial therapy and pathogen detection. We also envision such capsules to be akin to artificial “cells” that can participate in native biological signaling and communicate in real‐time with the human microbiome. Through such interaction capabilities, these “cells” may sense the health of the microbiome, and direct its function in a desired, host‐friendly manner. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 552–562. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Chitosan–alginate capsules were formed and subsequently loaded with an AI‐2 synthase “nanofactory” to modulate QS activity in . We propose that biologically inspired carriers of molecular synthesis systems in native settings can modulate bacterial populations, including those of the human microbiome.
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titleEncapsulated fusion protein confers “sense and respond” activity to chitosan–alginate capsules to manipulate bacterial quorum sensing
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abstractWe demonstrate that “nanofactory”‐loaded biopolymer capsules placed in the midst of a bacterial population can direct bacterial communication. Quorum sensing (QS) is a process by which bacteria communicate through small‐molecules, such as autoinducer‐2 (AI‐2), leading to collective behaviors such as virulence and biofilm formation. In our approach, a “nanofactory” construct is created, which comprises an antibody complexed with a fusion protein that produces AI‐2. These nanofactories are entrapped within capsules formed by electrostatic complexation of cationic (chitosan) and anionic (sodium alginate) biopolymers. The chitosan capsule shell is crosslinked by tripolyphosphate (TPP) to confer structural integrity. The capsule shell is impermeable to the encapsulated nanofactories, but freely permeable to small molecules. In turn, the capsules are able to take in substrates from the external medium via diffusion, and convert these via the nanofactories into AI‐2, which then diffuses out. The exported AI‐2 is shown to stimulate QS responses in vicinal Directing bacterial population behavior has potential applications in next‐generation antimicrobial therapy and pathogen detection. We also envision such capsules to be akin to artificial “cells” that can participate in native biological signaling and communicate in real‐time with the human microbiome. Through such interaction capabilities, these “cells” may sense the health of the microbiome, and direct its function in a desired, host‐friendly manner. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 552–562. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Chitosan–alginate capsules were formed and subsequently loaded with an AI‐2 synthase “nanofactory” to modulate QS activity in . We propose that biologically inspired carriers of molecular synthesis systems in native settings can modulate bacterial populations, including those of the human microbiome.
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pubWiley Subscription Services, Inc., A Wiley Company
doi10.1002/bit.24711
pages552
date2013-02